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ASP.NET Hosting :: How to Setup URL Redirection

clock November 15, 2018 07:07 by author Jervis

We have so many clients asking about this issue. So, we decide to write this tutorial and hope this information can help other people too. In this review, we will write simple tutorial about how to setup http/https redirection in IIS.

There are lots of routing options accessible in ASP.NET but still it comes a time when you need to manipulate a URL and manipulating it outside a code comes handy. When this happens, the best you can do id to use IIS Rewrite Module. Transforming various URL’s out of code enables you to do various things including performing redirections for archive or transferred content without interfering with the code, you can easily implement SEO optimizations and tweaks quickly and easily without code and many more. Below is a collection of useful IIS rewrite rules that will help you understand IIS rewrites.

Useful IIS Rewrite Rules

Adding www Prefix

This is a basic rule that adds prefix “www” to any URL you need. This is a requirement for SEO.

Redirection from Domain 1 to Domain 2

This rule comes handy when you change the name of your site or may be when you need to catch and alias and direct it to your main site. If the new and the old URLs share some elements, then you could just use this rule to have the matching pattern together with the redirect target being.

HTTPS/HTTP Redirection

Redirecting users from HTTP to HTTPS is one of the reasons that you need to apply useful IIS rewrite rules. It can lead to conditional statements while looking for dev/test mode in your code. This rules allows you to handle the redirection without much statements which is tidier.

There is a pair of rules in this case each for one of the two ways. In both the rules, a check is performed to verify that the protocol used is http/https. The rules work on the same URL patterns or the similar lists of pages to match. For the redirect to HTTP, it is not about matching the pages; it is a reverse of the first rule and usually have a number of .NET/site paths that are excluded.

Setup Redirection Using IIS

Above steps is to setup URL redirection via your code. But, if you manage your own server, you can also setup redirection via IIS. The following is the steps

1. Download and install the “URL Rewrite” module.

2. Open the “IIS Manager” console and select the website you would like to apply the redirection to in the left-side menu:



3. Double-click on the “URL Rewrite” icon.

4. Click “Add Rule(s)” in the right-side menu.

5. Select “Blank Rule” in the “Inbound” section, then press “OK”:

6. Enter any rule name you wish.

7. In the “Match URL” section:

- Select “Matches the Pattern” in the “Requested URL” drop-down menu 
- Select “Regular Expressions” in the “Using” drop-down menu 
- Enter the following pattern in the “Match URL” section: “(.*)” 
- Check the “Ignore case” box

 

 

8. In the “Conditions” section, select “Match all” under the “Logical Grouping” drop-down menu and press “Add”.

9. In the prompted window:

- Enter “{HTTPS}” as a condition input 
- Select “Matches the Pattern” from the drop-down menu 
- Enter “^OFF$” as a pattern 
- Press “OK”

10. In the “Action” section, select “Redirect” as the action type and specify the following for “Redirect URL”:

https://{HTTP_HOST}/{R:1}

11. Check the “Append query string” box.

12.Select the Redirection Type of your choice. The whole “Action” section should look like this:

 

NOTE: There are 4 redirect types of the redirect rule that can be selected in that menu: 

- Permanent (301) – preferable type in this case, which tells clients that the content of the site is permanently moved to the HTTPS version. Good for SEO, as it brings all the traffic to your HTTPS website making a positive effect on its ranking in search engines. 
- Found (302) – should be used only if you moved the content of certain pages to a new place *temporarily*. This way the SEO traffic goes in favour of the previous content’s location. This option is generally not recommended for a HTTP/HTTPS redirect. 
- See Other (303) – specific redirect type for GET requests. Not recommended for HTTP/HTTPS. 
- Temporary (307) – HTTP/1.1 successor of 302 redirect type. Not recommended for HTTP/HTTPS.

13. Click on “Apply” on the right side of the “Actions” menu.

The redirect can be checked by accessing your site via http:// specified in the URL. To make sure that your browser displays not the cached version of your site, you can use anonymous mode of the browser.

The rule is created in IIS, but the site is still not redirected to https://

Normally, the redirection rule gets written into the web.config file located in the document root directory of your website. If the redirection does not work for some reason, make sure that web.config exists and check if it contains the appropriate rule.

To do this, follow these steps:

1. In the sites list of IIS, right-click on your site. Choose the “Explore” option:

 

2. “Explore” will open the document root directory of the site. Check if the web.config file is there.

3. The web.config file must have the following code block:

<configuration> 
<system.webServer> 
<rewrite> 
<rules> 
<rule name="HTTPS force" enabled="true" stopProcessing="true"> 
<match url="(.*)" /> 
<conditions> 
<add input="{HTTPS}" pattern="^OFF$" /> 
</conditions> 
<action type="Redirect" url="https://{HTTP_HOST}/{R:1}" redirectType="Permanent" /> 
</rule> 
</rules> 
</rewrite> 
</system.webServer> 
</configuration>

4. If the web.config file is missing, you can create a new .txt file, put the aforementioned code there, save and then rename the file to web.config.

 

 



ASP.NET Core Hosting - ASPHostPortal :: API Project ASP.NET Core

clock September 25, 2018 09:26 by author Jervis

In this post, we are going to write about what we consider to be the best practices while developing the .NET Core Web API project. How we can make it better and how to make it more maintainable.

Startup Class and the Service Configuration

In the Startup class, there are two methods: the ConfigureServices method for registering the services and the Configure method for adding the middleware components to the application’s pipeline.

So, the best practice is to keep the ConfigureServices method clean and readable as much as possible. Of course, we need to write the code inside that method to register the services, but we can do that in more readable and maintainable way by using the Extension methods.

For example, let’s look at the wrong way to register CORS:

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
    services.AddCors(options =>
    {
        options.AddPolicy("CorsPolicy",
            builder => builder.AllowAnyOrigin()
            .AllowAnyMethod()
            .AllowAnyHeader()
            .AllowCredentials());
    });
}    

Even though this way will work just fine, and will register CORS without any problem, imagine the size of this method after registering dozens of services.

That’s not readable at all.

The better way is to create an extension class with the static method: 

public static class ServiceExtensions
{
    public static void ConfigureCors(this IServiceCollection services)
    {
        services.AddCors(options =>
        {
            options.AddPolicy("CorsPolicy",
                builder => builder.AllowAnyOrigin()
                .AllowAnyMethod()
                .AllowAnyHeader()
                .AllowCredentials());
        });
    }
}

And then just to call this extended method upon the IServiceCollection type:

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
    services.ConfigureCors();
}

Project Organization

We should always try to split our application into smaller projects. That way we are getting the best project organization and separation of concerns (SoC). The business logic related to our entities, contracts, accessing the database, logging messages or sending an email message should always be in a separate .NET Core Class Library project.

Every small project inside our application should contain a number of folders to organize the business logic.

Here is just one simple example how a complete project should look like: 

Environment Based Settings

While we develop our application, that application is in the development environment. But as soon as we publish our application it is going to be in the production environment. Therefore having a separate configuration for each environment is always a good practice.

In .NET Core, this is very easy to accomplish.

As soon as we create the project, we are going to get the appsettings.json file and when we expand it we are going to see the appsetings.Development.json file:

All the settings inside this file are going to be used for the development environment.

We should add another file appsettings.Production.json, to use it in a production environment:

The production file is going to be placed right beneath the development one.

Data Access Layer

In many examples and different tutorials, we may see the DAL implemented inside the main project and instantiated in every controller. This is something we shouldn’t do.

When we work with DAL we should always create it as a separate service. This is very important in the .NET Core project because when we have DAL as a separate service we can register it inside the IOC (Inversion of Control) container. The IOC is the .NET Core’s built-in feature and by registering a DAL as a service inside the IOC we are able to use it in any controller by simple constructor injection:

public class OwnerController: Controller
{
    private IRepository _repository;
 
    public OwnerController(IRepository repository)
    {
        _repository = repository;
    }
}

Controllers

The controllers should always be as clean as possible. We shouldn’t place any business logic inside it.

So, our controllers should be responsible for accepting the service instances through the constructor injection and for organizing HTTP action methods (GET, POST, PUT, DELETE, PATCH…): 

public class OwnerController: Controller
{
    private ILoggerManager _logger;
    private IRepository _repository;
 
    public OwnerController(ILoggerManager logger, IRepository repository)
    {
        _logger = logger;
        _repository = repository;
    }
 
    [HttpGet]
    public IActionResult GetAllOwners()
    {           
    }
 
    [HttpGet("{id}", Name = "OwnerById")]
    public IActionResult GetOwnerById(Guid id)
    {          
    }
 
    [HttpGet("{id}/account")]
    public IActionResult GetOwnerWithDetails(Guid id)
    {
    }
 
    [HttpPost]
    public IActionResult CreateOwner([FromBody]Owner owner)
    {       
    }
 
    [HttpPut("{id}")]
    public IActionResult UpdateOwner(Guid id, [FromBody]Owner owner)
    {         
    }
 
    [HttpDelete("{id}")]
    public IActionResult DeleteOwner(Guid id)
    {        
    }
}

Actions

Our actions should always be clean and simple. Their responsibilities include handling HTTP requests, validating models, catching errors and returning responses: 

[HttpPost]
public IActionResult CreateOwner([FromBody]Owner owner)
{
    try
    {
        if (owner.IsObjectNull())
        {
            return BadRequest("Owner object is null");
        }
 
        if (!ModelState.IsValid)
        {
            return BadRequest("Invalid model object");
        }
 
        _repository.Owner.CreateOwner(owner);
 
        return CreatedAtRoute("OwnerById", new { id = owner.Id }, owner);
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        _logger.LogError($"Something went wrong inside the CreateOwner action: {ex}");
        return StatusCode(500, "Internal server error");
    }
}

Our actions should have IActionResult as a return type in most of the cases (sometimes we want to return a specific type or a JsonResult…). That way we can use all the methods inside .NET Core which returns results and the status codes as well.

The most used methods are:

  • OK => returns the 200 status code
  • NotFound => returns the 404 status code
  • BadRequest => returns the 400 status code
  • NoContent => returns the 204 status code
  • Created, CreatedAtRoute, CreatedAtAction => returns the 201 status code
  • Unauthorized => returns the 401 status code
  • Forbid => returns the 403 status code
  • StatusCode => returns the status code we provide as input 

Handling Errors Globally

In the example above, our action has its own try-catch block. This is very important because we need to handle all the errors (that in another way would be unhandled) in our action method. Many developers are using try-catch blocks in their actions and there is absolutely nothing wrong with that approach. But, we want our actions to be clean and simple, therefore, removing try-catch blocks from our actions and placing them in one centralized place would be an even better approach.

.NET Core gives us an opportunity to implement exception handling globally with a little effort by using built-in and ready to use middleware. All we have to do is to add that middleware in the Startup class by modifying the Configure method:

 public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app, IHostingEnvironment env)
 {
     app.UseExceptionHandler(config =>
     {
         config.Run(async context =>
         {
             context.Response.StatusCode = 500;
             context.Response.ContentType = "application/json";
 
             var error = context.Features.Get<IExceptionHandlerFeature>();
             if (error != null)
             {
                 var ex = error.Error;
 
                 await context.Response.WriteAsync(new ErrorModel()
                 {
                     StatusCode = 500,
                     ErrorMessage = ex.Message
                 }.ToString(); //ToString() is overridden to Serialize object
             }
         });
     });
 
     app.UseMvc();
}

We can even write our own custom error handlers by creating custom middleware: 

public class CustomExceptionMiddleware
{
    //constructor and service injection
 
    public async Task Invoke(HttpContext httpContext)
    {
        try
        {
            await _next(httpContext);
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            _logger.LogError("Unhandled exception ...", ex);
            await HandleExceptionAsync(httpContext, ex);
        }
    }
   
    //additional methods
}

After that we need to register it and add it to applications pipeline: 

public static IApplicationBuilder UseCustomExceptionMiddleware(this IApplicationBuilder builder)
{
    return builder.UseMiddleware<CustomExceptionMiddleware>();
}

Using ActionFilters to Remove Duplicated Code

Filters in ASP.NET Core allows us to run some code prior to or after the specific stage in a request pipeline. Therefore, we can use them to execute validation actions that we need to repeat in our action methods.

When we handle a PUT or POST request in our action methods, we need to validate our model object as we did in the Actions part of this article. As a result, that would cause the repetition of our validation code, and we want to avoid that (Basically we want to avoid any code repetition as much as we can).

We can do that by using the ActionFilters. Instead of validation code in our action: 

if (!ModelState.IsValid)
{
  // bad request and logging logic
}

We can create our filter: 

public class ModelValidationAttribute : ActionFilterAttribute
{
    public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext context)
    {
        if (!context.ModelState.IsValid)
        {
            context.Result = new BadRequestObjectResult(context.ModelState); // returns 400 with error
        }
    }
}

And register it in the Startup class in the ConfigureServices method: 

services.AddScoped<ModelValidationAttribute>();

Now, we can use that filter with our action methods.

Microsoft.AspNetCore.All Meta-Package

This meta-package contains all of the AspNetCore packages, EntityFrameworkCore packages, SignalR package (from version 2.1) and the supporting packages required for running the framework. It is pretty convenient when starting a new project because we don’t have to manually install and reference all the packages we might need.

Of course, your machine needs to have the .NET Core runtime installed on it in order to use the AspNetCore meta-package.

Routing

In the .NET Core Web API projects, we should use Attribute Routing instead of Conventional Routing. That’s because Attribute Routing helps us match the route parameter names with the actual parameters inside the action methods. Another reason is the description of the route parameters. It is more readable when we see the parameter with the name “ownerId” than just “id”.

We can use the [Route] attribute on top of the controller and on top of the action itself: 

[Route("api/[controller]")]
public class OwnerController: Controller
{
     [Route("{id}")]
     [HttpGet]
     public IActionResult GetOwnerById(Guid id)
     {
           
     } 
}

There is another way to create routes for the controller and actions: 

[Route("api/owner")]
public class OwnerController: Controller
{
     [HttpGet("{id}")]
     public IActionResult GetOwnerById(Guid id)
     {
           
     } 
}

There are different opinions which way is better, but we would always recommend the second way, and this is something we always use in our projects.

When we talk about the routing we need to mention the route naming convention. We can use descriptive names for our actions, but for the routes/endpoints, we should use NOUNS and not VERBS.

The few wrong examples: 

[Route("api/owner")]
public class OwnerController : Controller
{
    [HttpGet("getAllOwners")]
    public IActionResult GetAllOwners()
    {
    }
 
    [HttpGet("getOwnerById/{id}"]
    public IActionResult GetOwnerById(Guid id)
    {       
    }
}

The good examples: 

[Route("api/owner")]
public class OwnerController : Controller
{
    [HttpGet]
    public IActionResult GetAllOwners()
    {
    }
 
    [HttpGet("{id}"]
    public IActionResult GetOwnerById(Guid id)
    {         
    }
}

Logging

If we plan to publish our application to production, we should have a logging mechanism in place. Log messages are very helpful when figuring out how our software behaves in a production.

.NET Core has its own logging implementation by using the ILoggerinterface. It is very easy to implement it by using Dependency Injection feature: 

public class TestController: Controller
{
    private readonly ILogger _logger;
 
    public TestController(ILogger<TestController> logger)
    {
        _logger = logger;
    }
}

Then in our actions, we can utilize various logging levels by using the _logger object.

.NET Core supports logging API that works with a variety of logging providers. Therefore, we may use different logging providers to implement our own logging logic inside our project.

The NLog is the great library to use for implementing our own custom logging logic. It is extensible, supports structured logging and very easy to configure. We can log our messages in the console window, files or even database. 

CryptoHelper

We won’t talk about how we shouldn’t store the passwords in a database as a plain text and how we need to hash them due to security reasons. That’s out of the scope of this article. There are various hashing algorithms all over the internet, and there are many different and great ways to hash a password.

But if need the library that provides support to the .NET Core’s application and that is easy to use, the CryptoHelper is quite a good library.

This library is available for installation through the NuGet and its usage is quite simple:

using CryptoHelper;
 
// Method for hashing the password
public string HashPassword(string password)
{
    return Crypto.HashPassword(password);
}
 
// Method to verify the password hash against the given password
public bool VerifyPassword(string hash, string password)
{
    return Crypto.VerifyHashedPassword(hash, password);
}

Content Negotiation

By default .NET Core Web API returns a JSON formatted result. In most of the cases, that’s all we need.

But what if the consumer of our Web API wants another response format, like XML for example?

For that, we need to create a server configuration to format our response in the desired way: 

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
    services.AddMvc(config =>
    {
        // Add XML Content Negotiation
        config.RespectBrowserAcceptHeader = true;
        config.InputFormatters.Add(new XmlSerializerInputFormatter());
        config.OutputFormatters.Add(new XmlSerializerOutputFormatter());
    });
}

Sometimes the client may request a format that is not supported by our Web API and then the best practice is to respond with the status code 406 Not Acceptable. That can be configured inside our ConfigureServices method as well: 

config.ReturnHttpNotAcceptable = true;

We can create our own custom format rules as well.

Using JWT

JSON Web Tokens (JWT) are becoming more popular by the day in the web development. It is very easy to implement JWT Authentication is very easy to implement due to the .NET Core’s built-in support. JWT is an open standard and it allows us to transmit the data between a client and a server as a JSON object in a secure way.

We can configure the JWT Authentication in the ConfigureServices method:

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
     services.AddAuthentication(JwtBearerDefaults.AuthenticationScheme)
       .AddJwtBearer(options =>
       {
          options.TokenValidationParameters = new TokenValidationParameters
          {
             //Configuration in here
          };
       });
}

In order to use it inside the application, we need to invoke this code in the Configure method:

app.UseAuthentication();

We may use JWT for the Authorization part as well, by simply adding the role claims to the JWT configuration 

Conclusion

In this article, our main goal was to familiarize you with the best practices when developing a Web API project in .NET Core. Some of those could be used in other frameworks as well, therefore, having them in mind is always helpful.

If you find that something is missing from the list, don’t hesitate to add it in a comment section.

Thank you for reading the article and I hope you found something useful in it.



ASP.NET 4.5 Hosting - ASPHostPortal :: Timeout in Regular Expressions ASP.NET 4.5

clock December 10, 2015 21:07 by author Jervis

Regular expressions are common forms of parsing a document and get meaning. It has been very popular and most of the people do use it regularly to solve their complex problems.

Lets start by the new Regex Api introduced with the framework. The improvement that has been made is minor yet handy at certain cases. The Regex class of .NET 4.5 supports Timeout. Lets take a look how to work with it.

Lets try to write a simplest RegEx validator to look into it. 

Try
{
    Regex regexpr =
new Regex("[A-Z ]{10}", RegexOptions.Singleline, TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(1));
    Match mch = regexpr.Match(
"ABHISHEK SUR");
   
if (mch.Success)
        Console.WriteLine(
"Match found");
   
else
        Console.WriteLine(
"Not matched");

}
catch (RegexMatchTimeoutException ex)
{
    Console.WriteLine(
"Regex Timeout for {1} after {2} elapsed. Tried pattern {0}", ex.Pattern, ex.Message, ex.MatchTimeout);
}
catch (ArgumentOutOfRangeException ex)
{
    Console.WriteLine(ex.ToString());
}
finally
{
    Console.ReadKey(
true);
}

Here in the code you can see I simply check a string with a Regular expression. It eventually finds success as Pattern matches the string. Now this code is little different than what we have been doing for last few years. The constructor overload of Regex now supports a Timespan seed, which indicates the timeout value after which the Regular expression validator would automatically generate a RegexMatchTimeoutException. The Match defined within the Regex class can generate timeout after a certain time exceeds.

 You can specify Regex.InfiniteMatchTimeout to specify that the timeout does not occur. The value of InfiniteMatchTimeout is -1ms internally and you can also use Timespan.Frommilliseconds(-1) as value for timespan which will indicate that the Regular expression will never timeout which being the default behavior of our normal Regex class. Regex also supports AppDomain to get default value of the Timeout. You can set timeout value for "REGEX_DEFAULT_MATCH_TIMEOUT" in AppDomain to set it all the way through the Regular expressions being used in the same AppDomain. Lets take a look how it works.

Try
{
    AppDomain.CurrentDomain.SetData("REGEX_DEFAULT_MATCH_TIMEOUT", TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(2));

    Regex regexpr = new Regex("[A-Z ]{10}", RegexOptions.Singleline);
    Match mch = regexpr.Match("ABHISHEK SUR");
    if (mch.Success)
        Console.WriteLine("Match found");
    else
        Console.WriteLine("Not matched");

}
catch (RegexMatchTimeoutException ex)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Regex Timeout for {1} after {2} elapsed. Tried pattern {0}", ex.Pattern, ex.Message, ex.MatchTimeout);
}
catch (ArgumentOutOfRangeException ex)
{
    Console.WriteLine(ex.ToString());
}
finally
{
    Console.ReadKey(true);
}

Now this works exactly the same as the previous one. Here the Regex constructor automatically checks the AppDomain value and applies it as default. If it is not present, it will take -1 as default which is Infinite TImeout and also if explicitely timeout is specified after the default value from AppDomain, the Regex class is smart enough to use the explicitly set value only to itself for which it is specified. The Regex Constructor generates a TypeInitializationException if appdomain value of Timespan is invalid. Lets check the internal structure.

This is the actual code that runs in background and generates the timeouts. In fact while scanning the string with the pattern, there is a call to CheckTimeout which checks whether the time specified is elapsed for the object. The CheckTimeout throws the exception from itself.

The Constructor sets DefaultMatchTimeout when the object is created taking it from AppDomain data elements.

If you read MSDN thoroughly, it suggests to use Timeouts when specifying the Regular expressions. If the pattern is supplied from external or you are not sure about the pattern that needs to be applied to the string, it is always recommended to use Timeouts. Basically you should also specify a rational limit of AppDomain regex default to ensure no regular expression can ever hang your application.

This is a small tip on the new Regex enhancements introduced with .NET 4.5 recently.  

 



ASP.NET Hosting Tips - ASPHostPortal :: SQLParameters in ASP.NET C#

clock November 16, 2015 22:10 by author Jervis

SqlParameter represents a parameter to a SqlCommand and optionally its mapping to DataSet columns. Parameter names are not case sensitive. 

To initialize a new instance of SqlParameter class, we can use many constructors such as SqlParameter(), SqlParameter(String, SqlDbType), SqlParameter(String, Object), SqlParameter(String, SqlDbType, Int32), SqlParameter(String, SqlDbType, Int32, String). 

SqlParameter() constructor initialize a new instance of SqlParameter class. Sqlparameter(String, SqlDbType) constructor require parameter name and data type. SqlParameter(String, Object) constructor require parameter name and a value of the new SqlParameter. SqlParameter(String, SqlDbtype, Int32) constructor require parameter name, SqlDbType and size. SqlParameter(String, SqlDbtype, Int32, String) constructor require parameter name , SqlDbType, size and the source column name. 

SqlParameter class have many useful properties such as CompareInfo, DbType, Direction, IsNullable, Offset, ParameterName, Precision, Scale, Size, SourceColumn, SqlDbType, SqlValue, TypeName, Value, XmlSchemaCollectionName etc. 

ParameterName property get or set the SqlParameter name. SqlDbType property get or set the SqlDbType (SQL Server specific data type) for the parameter. SqlDbType enumeration values are BigInt, Binary, Bit, Char, Date, DateTime, Decimal, Float, Image, Int, Money, Real, Text, Time, Timestamp etc. SqlParameter Size property get or set the maximum size in bytes of the data within the column. Direction property get or set a value that indicate whether the parameter is input only, output only, bidirectional or a stored procedure return value parameter. Value property get or set the value of parameter. 

The following c# example source code describe you more about SqlParameter in ASP.NET. 

Create a web form name SqlParameterExample.aspx. Now add a GridView control. We populate the GridView control with SqlDataSource Data. But here we filter the data by SqlParameter. In this example we select the NorthWind database Products table data and filter it with SqlParameter product name. The source code of SqlParameterExample.aspx is here.

<%@ Page Language="C#" %>
<%@ Import Namespace="System.Data" %>
<%@ Import Namespace="System.Data.SqlClient" %>
<%@ Import Namespace="System.Configuration" %>

<!DOCTYPE html>

<script runat="server">
    protected void Page_Load(object sender, System.EventArgs e) {
        if (!Page.IsPostBack) {
            SqlConnection MyConnection;
            SqlCommand MyCommand;
            SqlDataReader MyReader;
            SqlParameter ProductNameParam;

            MyConnection = new SqlConnection();
            MyConnection.ConnectionString = ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["AppConnectionString1"].ConnectionString;

            MyCommand = new SqlCommand();
            MyCommand.CommandText = "SELECT * FROM PRODUCTS WHERE PRODUCTNAME = @PRODUCTNAME";
            MyCommand.CommandType = CommandType.Text;
            MyCommand.Connection = MyConnection;

            ProductNameParam = new SqlParameter();
            ProductNameParam.ParameterName = "@PRODUCTNAME";
            ProductNameParam.SqlDbType = SqlDbType.VarChar;
            ProductNameParam.Size = 25;
            ProductNameParam.Direction = ParameterDirection.Input;
            ProductNameParam.Value = "CHAI";

            MyCommand.Parameters.Add(ProductNameParam);

            MyCommand.Connection.Open();
            MyReader = MyCommand.ExecuteReader(CommandBehavior.CloseConnection);

            GridView1.DataSource = MyReader;
            GridView1.DataBind();

            MyCommand.Dispose();
            MyConnection.Dispose();
        }
    }
</script>

<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head runat="server">
    <title>SqlParameter example: how to use SqlParameter in asp.net</title>
</head>
<body>
   
<form id="form1" runat="server">
   
<div>
       
<asp:GridView ID="GridView1" runat="server">
       
</asp:GridView>
   
</div>
   
</form>
</body>
</html>

 



ASP.NET 4.5 HOSTING - ASPHostPortal.com :: A simple SPA with AngularJs, ASP.NET MVC, Web API and EF

clock November 14, 2014 06:41 by author Mark

Introduction

SPA stands for Single Page Application. Here I will demonstrate a simple SPA with ASP.NET MVC, Web API and Entity Framework. I will show a trainer profile and its CRUD operation using AngularJS, ASP.NET MVC, Web api and Entity Framework.

Step 1: Create a ASP.NET MVC application with empty template

  • Open visual studio, Got to File->New->Project
  • Select Template -> Visual C# -> Web -> ASP.NET MVC 4 Web application and click OK
  • Select Empty Template and Razor as view engine

Step 2: Install required packages

Run the following command in Package Manager Console (Tools->Library Package Manager->Package Manager Console) to install required package. Make sure your internet connection is enabled.

  • PM> Install-Package jQuery
  • PM> Install-Package angularjs -Version 1.2.26
  • PM> Install-Package Newtonsoft.Json
  • PM> Install-Package MvcScaffolding

Step 3: Create Connection String

Create connection string and name DB name as SPADB
    <connectionStrings>
  <add name="SPAContext" connectionString="Data Source=.\sqlexpress;Initial Catalog=SPADB;Integrated Security=SSPI;" providerName="System.Data.SqlClient" />
</connectionStrings>

Step 4: Create model

Create Trainer model
    public class Trainer
{
    [Key, DatabaseGenerated(DatabaseGeneratedOption.Identity)]
    public long Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Email { get; set; }
    public string Venue { get; set; }
}

Step 5: Create Repository

Create repository for Trainer model.

Run the following command in Package Manager Console (Tools->Library Package Manager->Package Manager Console) to create repository. I used repository pattern for well-structured and more manageable.

PM> Scaffold Repository Trainer

After running the above command you will see SPAContext.cs and TrainerRepository.cs created in Model folder. For well manageability, I create a directory name Repository and put these two files in the Repository folder. So change the namespace as like SPA.Repository instead of SPA.Model. I also create a UnitOfWork for implement unit of work pattern.
The overall folder structure looks like following. 
SPAContext.cs
    public class SPAContext : DbContext
{
    public SPAContext()
        : base("SPAContext")
    {
    }
    // You can add custom code to this file. Changes will not be overwritten.
    //
    // If you want Entity Framework to drop and regenerate your database
    // automatically whenever you change your model schema, add the following
    // code to the Application_Start method in your Global.asax file.
    // Note: this will destroy and re-create your database with every model change.
    //
    // System.Data.Entity.Database.SetInitializer(new System.Data.Entity.DropCreateDatabaseIfModelChanges<SPA.Models.SPAContext>());
    public DbSet<SPA.Models.Trainer> Trainers { get; set; }
    public DbSet<SPA.Models.Training> Trainings { get; set; }
}

TrainerRepository.cs
    public class TrainerRepository : ITrainerRepository
{
    SPAContext context = new SPAContext();
    public TrainerRepository()
        : this(new SPAContext())
    {
    }
    public TrainerRepository(SPAContext context)
    {
        this.context = context;
    }
    public IQueryable<Trainer> All
    {
        get { return context.Trainers; }
    }
    public IQueryable<Trainer> AllIncluding(params Expression<Func<Trainer, object>>[] includeProperties)
    {
        IQueryable<Trainer> query = context.Trainers;
        foreach (var includeProperty in includeProperties)
        {
            query = query.Include(includeProperty);
        }
        return query;
    }
    public Trainer Find(long id)
    {
        return context.Trainers.Find(id);
    }
    public void InsertOrUpdate(Trainer trainer)
    {
        if (trainer.Id == default(long))
        {
            // New entity
            context.Trainers.Add(trainer);
        }
        else
        {
            // Existing entity
            context.Entry(trainer).State = System.Data.Entity.EntityState.Modified;
        }
    }
    public void Delete(long id)
    {
        var trainer = context.Trainers.Find(id);
        context.Trainers.Remove(trainer);
    }
    public void Save()
    {
        context.SaveChanges();
    }
    public void Dispose()
    {
        context.Dispose();
    }
}
public interface ITrainerRepository : IDisposable
{
    IQueryable<Trainer> All { get; }
    IQueryable<Trainer> AllIncluding(params Expression<Func<Trainer, object>>[] includeProperties);
    Trainer Find(long id);
    void InsertOrUpdate(Trainer trainer);
    void Delete(long id);
    void Save();
}

UnitOfWork.cs
public class UnitOfWork : IDisposable
{
    private SPAContext context;
    public UnitOfWork()
    {
        context = new SPAContext();
    }
    public UnitOfWork(SPAContext _context)
    {
        this.context = _context;
    }
    private TrainingRepository _trainingRepository;
 
    public TrainingRepository TrainingRepository
    {
        get
        {
            if (this._trainingRepository == null)
            {
                this._trainingRepository = new TrainingRepository(context);
            }
            return _trainingRepository;
        }
    }
    private TrainerRepository _trainerRepository;
    public TrainerRepository TrainerRepository
    {
        get
        {
            if (this._trainerRepository == null)
            {
                this._trainerRepository = new TrainerRepository(context);
            }
            return _trainerRepository;
        }
    }
    public void Dispose()
    {
        context.Dispose();
        GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
    }
}

Step 6: Add migration

  • Run the following command to add migration
  • PM> Enable-Migrations
  • PM> Add-Migration initialmigration
  • PM> Update-Database –Verbose

Step 7: Create API Controllers

Create Trainers api Controllers by clicking right button on Controller folder and scaffold as follows.

Step 8: Modify Controllers

Now modify the controllers as follows. Here I used unit of work pattern.
    public class TrainersController : ApiController
{
    private UnitOfWork unitOfWork = new UnitOfWork();
    public IEnumerable<Trainer> Get()
    {
        List<Trainer> lstTrainer = new List<Trainer>();
        lstTrainer = unitOfWork.TrainerRepository.All.ToList();
        return lstTrainer;
    }
    //// GET api/trainers/5
    public Trainer Get(int id)
    {
        Trainer objTrainer = unitOfWork.TrainerRepository.Find(id);
        return objTrainer;
    }
    public HttpResponseMessage Post(Trainer trainer)
    {
        if (ModelState.IsValid)
        {
            unitOfWork.TrainerRepository.InsertOrUpdate(trainer);
            unitOfWork.TrainerRepository.Save();
            return new HttpResponseMessage(HttpStatusCode.OK);
        }
        return new HttpResponseMessage(HttpStatusCode.InternalServerError);
    }
    private IEnumerable<string> GetErrorMessages()
    {
        return ModelState.Values.SelectMany(x => x.Errors.Select(e => e.ErrorMessage));
    }
    // PUT api/trainers/5
    public HttpResponseMessage Put(int Id, Trainer trainer)
    {
        if (ModelState.IsValid)
        {
            unitOfWork.TrainerRepository.InsertOrUpdate(trainer);
            unitOfWork.TrainerRepository.Save();
            return new HttpResponseMessage(HttpStatusCode.OK);
        }
        else
            return new HttpResponseMessage(HttpStatusCode.InternalServerError);
    }
    // DELETE api/trainers/5
    public HttpResponseMessage Delete(int id)
    {
        Trainer objTrainer = unitOfWork.TrainerRepository.Find(id);
        if (objTrainer == null)
        {
            return new HttpResponseMessage(HttpStatusCode.InternalServerError);
        }
        unitOfWork.TrainerRepository.Delete(id);
        unitOfWork.TrainerRepository.Save();
        return new HttpResponseMessage(HttpStatusCode.OK);
    }
}

Step 9: Create Layout and Home Controller

Create _Layout.cshtml in Views->Shared folder and create HomeController and create inext view of Home controller by right click on index action and add view. You will see index.cshtml is created in Views->Home
Home Controller
    public class HomeController : Controller
{
    //
    // GET: /Home/
 
    public ActionResult Index()
    {
        return View();
    }
}

_Layout.cshtml
    <html ng-app="registrationModule">
<head>
    <title>Training Registration</title>
</head>
<body>
    @RenderBody()
</body>
</html>
Index.cshtml
    @{
    ViewBag.Title = "Home";
    Layout = "~/Views/Shared/_Layout.cshtml";
}
<h2>Home</h2>
<div>
    <ul>     
        <li><a href="/Registration/Trainers">Trainer Details</a></li>
        <li><a href="/Registration/Trainers/add">Add New Trainer</a></li>
    </ul>
</div>
<div ng-view></div>

Step 10: Create registrationModule

Create registrationModule.js in Scripts->Application. This is for angularjs routing.
    var registrationModule = angular.module("registrationModule", ['ngRoute', 'ngResource'])
    .config(function ($routeProvider, $locationProvider) {
        $routeProvider.when('/Registration/Trainers', {
            templateUrl: '/templates/trainers/all.html',
            controller: 'listTrainersController'
        });
        $routeProvider.when('/Registration/Trainers/:id', {
            templateUrl: '/templates/trainers/edit.html',
            controller: 'editTrainersController'
        });
        $routeProvider.when('/Registration/Trainers/add', {
            templateUrl: '/templates/trainers/add.html',
            controller: 'addTrainersController'
        });
        $routeProvider.when("/Registration/Trainers/delete/:id", {
            controller: "deleteTrainersController",
            templateUrl: "/templates/trainers/delete.html"
        });
        $locationProvider.html5Mode(true);
    });

Step 11: Create trainerRepository

Create trainerRepository.js in Scripts->Application->Repository. This increase manageability for large application.
    'use strict';
//Repository for trainer information
registrationModule.factory('trainerRepository', function ($resource) {
    return {
        get: function () {
            return $resource('/api/Trainers').query();
        },
        getById: function (id) {
            return $resource('/api/Trainers/:Id', { Id: id }).get();
        },
        save: function (trainer) {
            return $resource('/api/Trainers').save(trainer);
        },
        put: function (trainer) {
            return $resource('/api/Trainers', { Id: trainer.id },
                {
                    update: { method: 'PUT' }
                }).update(trainer);
        },
        remove: function (id) {
            return $resource('/api/Trainers').remove({ Id: id });
        }
    };
});

Step 12: Create trainerController

Create trainerController.js in Scripts->Application->Controllers
    'use strict';
//Controller to get list of trainers informaion
registrationModule.controller("listTrainersController", function ($scope, trainerRepository, $location) {
    $scope.trainers = trainerRepository.get();
});
//Controller to save trainer information
registrationModule.controller("addTrainersController", function ($scope, trainerRepository, $location) {
    $scope.save = function (trainer) {
        trainer.Id = 0;
        $scope.errors = [];
        trainerRepository.save(trainer).$promise.then(
            function () { $location.url('Registration/Trainers'); },
            function (response) { $scope.errors = response.data; });
    };
});

//Controller to modify trainer information
registrationModule.controller("editTrainersController", function ($scope,$routeParams, trainerRepository, $location) {
    $scope.trainer = trainerRepository.getById($routeParams.id);
    $scope.update = function (trainer) {
        $scope.errors = [];
        trainerRepository.put(trainer).$promise.then(
            function () { $location.url('Registration/Trainers'); },
            function (response) { $scope.errors = response.data; });
    };
});
//Controller to delete trainer information
registrationModule.controller("deleteTrainersController", function ($scope, $routeParams, trainerRepository, $location) {
        trainerRepository.remove($routeParams.id).$promise.then(
            function () { $location.url('Registration/Trainers'); },
            function (response) { $scope.errors = response.data; });
});

Step 13: Create templates

Create all.html, add.html, edit.html, delete.html in templateds->trainers folder.
All.html
    <div>
    <div>
        <h2>Trainers Details</h2>
    </div>
</div>
<div>
    <div>
        <table>
            <tr>
                <th>Name </th>
                <th>Email </th>
                <th>Venue </th>
                <th>Action</th>
            </tr>
            <tr ng-repeat="trainer in trainers">
                <td>{{trainer.name}}</td>
                <td>{{trainer.email}}</td>
                <td>{{trainer.venue}}</td>
                <td>
                    <a title="Delete" ng-href="/Registration/Trainers/delete/{{trainer.id}}">Delete</a>
                    |<a title="Edit" ng-href="/Registration/Trainers/{{trainer.id}}">Edit</a>
                </td>
            </tr>
        </table>
    </div>
</div>

Add.html
    <form name="trainerForm" novalidate ng-submit="save(trainer)">
    <table>
        <tbody>
            <tr>
                <td>Trainer Name
                </td>
                <td>
                    <input name="name" type="text" ng-model="trainer.name" required ng-minlength="5" />
                </td>
            </tr>
            <tr>
                <td>Email
                </td>
                <td>
                    <input name="email" type="text" ng-model="trainer.email" />
                </td>
            </tr>
            <tr>
                <td>Venue
                </td>
                <td>
                    <input name="venue" type="text" ng-model="trainer.venue" />
                </td>
            </tr>
            <tr>
                <td class="width30"></td>
                <td>
                    <input type="submit" value="Save" ng-disabled="trainerForm.$invalid" />
                    <a href="/Registration/Trainers" class="btn btn-inverse">Cancel</a>
                </td>
            </tr>
        </tbody>
    </table>
</form>
Edit.html
    <form name="trainerFrom" novalidate abide>
    <table>
        <tbody>
            <tr>
                <td>
                    <input name="id" type="hidden" ng-model="trainer.id"/>
                </td>
            </tr>
            <tr>
                <td>Name
                </td>
                <td>
                    <input name="name" type="text" ng-model="trainer.name" />
                </td>
            </tr>
            <tr>
                <td>Email
                </td>
                <td>
                    <input name="email" type="text" ng-model="trainer.email" />
                </td>
            </tr>
            <tr>
                <td>Venue
                </td>
                <td>
                    <textarea name="venue" ng-model="trainer.venue"></textarea>
                </td>
            </tr>
            <tr>
                <td class="width30"></td>
                <td>
                    <button type="submit" class="btn btn-primary" ng-click="update(trainer)" ng-disabled="trainerFrom.$invalid">Update</button>
                </td>
            </tr>
        </tbody>
    </table>
</form>

Step 14: Add references to the Layout

Modify the _Layout.cshtml to add references
_Layout.cshtml
    <html ng-app="registrationModule">
<head>
    <title>Training Registration</title>
    <script src="~/Scripts/angular.min.js"></script>
    <script src="~/Scripts/angular-resource.min.js"></script>
    <script src="~/Scripts/angular-route.min.js"></script>
    <script src="~/Scripts/jquery-2.1.1.min.js"></script>
    <script src="~/Scripts/Application/registrationModule.js"></script>
    <script src="~/Scripts/Application/Repository/trainerRepository.js"></script>
    <script src="~/Scripts/Application/Controllers/trainersController.js"></script>
</head>
<body>
    @RenderBody()
</body>
</html>

Now run you application and add, delete, modify and get all trainer information. Thanks for your patient! Laughing



ASP.NET 4.5 HOSTING - ASPHostPortal :: Design application layout by bootstrap theme

clock November 12, 2014 06:48 by author Mark

To design layout of your web site is much more cumbersome. But you can easily design your website layout by bootstrap, you can make it responsive also.

Step 1: Create a ASP.NET MVC application with empty template

  • Open visual studio, Got to File->New->Project
  • Select Template -> Visual C# -> Web -> ASP.NET MVC  Web application and click OK
  • Select Empty Template and Razor as view engine

Step 2: Install required packages

  • Run the following command in Package Manager Console (Tools->Library Package Manager->Package Manager Console) to install required package. Make sure your internet connection is enabled.

PM> Install-Package bootstrap

Step 3: Download bootstrap theme

  • Go to http://bootswatch.com/ . Download any theme (bootstrap.css) like below and pest the content in Contents -> bootstrap-main-theme.css file

Step 4: Create a Layout page

  • Create a _Layout.cshtml in Views->Shared folder and add the following references.

_Layout.cshtml

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
    <title>Bootstrap theme test</title>
    <link href="~/Content/bootstrap.min.css" rel="stylesheet" />
    <link href="~/Content/bootstrap-main-theme.css" rel="stylesheet" />
    <script src="~/Scripts/jquery-1.9.1.min.js"></script>
    <script src="~/Scripts/bootstrap.js"></script>
 </head>
<body>  
    <div>
        @RenderBody()
    </div>
</body>
</html>

Step 5: Create HomeController and index view

  • Create HomeController and create index view. Right click on index action of home controller you will see index.cshtml file created in Views->Home folder. Modify the index.cshtml file like following

Index.cshtml

@{
    ViewBag.Title = "Index";
    Layout = "~/Views/Shared/_Layout.cshtml";
}
 <h2>Home Page</h2>

Step 6: Add Navigation bar

  • If you go the preview of the theme you will see some sample code or documentation. You can customize later. To add navigation bar to the website I modify the _Layout.cshtml like following.

_Layout.cshtml

<!DOCTYPE html>
 <html>
<head>
    <title>Bootstrap theme test</title>
    <link href="~/Content/bootstrap.min.css" rel="stylesheet" />
    <link href="~/Content/bootstrap-main-theme.css" rel="stylesheet" />
    <script src="~/Scripts/jquery-1.9.1.min.js"></script>
    <script src="~/Scripts/bootstrap.js"></script>
 </head>
<body>
    <div class="navbar navbar-inverse">
  <div class="navbar-header">
    <button type="button" class="navbar-toggle" data-toggle="collapse" data-target=".navbar-inverse-collapse">
      <span class="icon-bar"></span>
      <span class="icon-bar"></span>
      <span class="icon-bar"></span>
    </button>
    <a class="navbar-brand" href="#">Brand</a>
  </div>
  <div class="navbar-collapse collapse navbar-inverse-collapse">
    <ul class="nav navbar-nav">
      <li class="active"><a href="#">Active</a></li>
      <li><a href="#">Link</a></li>
      <li class="dropdown">
        <a href="#" class="dropdown-toggle" data-toggle="dropdown">Dropdown <b class="caret"></b></a>
        <ul class="dropdown-menu">
          <li><a href="#">Action</a></li>
          <li><a href="#">Another action</a></li>
          <li><a href="#">Something else here</a></li>
          <li class="divider"></li>
          <li class="dropdown-header">Dropdown header</li>
          <li><a href="#">Separated link</a></li>
          <li><a href="#">One more separated link</a></li>
        </ul>
      </li>
    </ul>
    <form class="navbar-form navbar-left">
      <input type="text" class="form-control col-lg-8" placeholder="Search">
    </form>
    <ul class="nav navbar-nav navbar-right">
      <li><a href="#">Link</a></li>
      <li class="dropdown">
        <a href="#" class="dropdown-toggle" data-toggle="dropdown">Dropdown <b class="caret"></b></a>
        <ul class="dropdown-menu">
          <li><a href="#">Action</a></li>
          <li><a href="#">Another action</a></li>
          <li><a href="#">Something else here</a></li>
          <li class="divider"></li>
          <li><a href="#">Separated link</a></li>
        </ul>
      </li>
    </ul>
  </div>
</div>
    <div>
        @RenderBody()
    </div>
</body>
</html>

Now run the application, you will get a nice layout. Thanks for your patient Smile



ASP.NET 4.5 Hosting - ASPHostPortal.com :: How to use Rangevalidator control in ASP.NET 4.5

clock November 7, 2014 06:26 by author Mark

If you want to understand how RangeValidator  control work in ASP.NET 4.5 Now, we will discuss about How to Use Rangevalidator control in ASP.NET 4.5. Rangevalidator control is used to check if the value is within a specified range of values. For example, Rangevalidator can be used to check if the age between 1 until 100.

In the codesnippet below, TextBox txtAge get age of the person. If User fill with any number that isn’t between 1 – 100 the validation fails. The minimum and maximum value for the age is specified by MinimumValue and MaximumValue properties. Since, Age is an integer, the Type is specified as integer. Write the code below:

&lt;asp:TextBox ID="txtAge" runat="server"&gt;&lt;/asp:TextBox&gt;
&lt;asp:RangeValidator ID="RangeValidator1" runat="server"
    ErrorMessage="Age must be between 1 &amp; 100"
    MinimumValue="1" MaximumValue="100"
    ControlToValidate="txtAge" Type="Integer" &gt;
&lt;/asp:RangeValidator&gt;

Properties for Rangevalidator control:

Type – Specifies the data type of the value to check. Data types supported include Currency, Date, Double, Integer and String.

MinimumValue – Minimum value that allowed

MaximumValue – Max value allowed in that field

The Rangevalidator only checks if the data is within the allowed range. If you wanna check for a required field, use RequiredFieldValidator. In the Age field, I am using both RequiredFieldValidator & RangeValidator. In this example I am using the Display property. If the Display property is not set, or, if it is set to static, then the error message will be rendered, with style visibility:hidden. Then the error message will always occupy the gap on the screen even if the validation passes.

<table>
    <tr>
        <td>
            <b>Age</b>
        </td>
        <td>
            :<asp:TextBox ID="txtAge" runat="server" Width="150px">
                </asp:TextBox>
            <asp:RangeValidator ID="RangeValidatorAge" runat="server"
                ErrorMessage="Age must be between 1 & 100"
                MinimumValue="1" MaximumValue="100"
                ControlToValidate="txtAge" Type="Integer"
                ForeColor="Red" Display="Dynamic">
            </asp:RangeValidator>
            <asp:RequiredFieldValidator ID="RequiredFieldValidatorAge"
            runat="server" ErrorMessage="Age is required"
            ControlToValidate="txtAge" ForeColor="Red"
            Display="Dynamic" >
            </asp:RequiredFieldValidator>
        </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>
            <b>Date Available</b>
        </td>
        <td>
            :<asp:TextBox ID="txtDateAvailable" runat="server" Width="150px">
            </asp:TextBox>
            <asp:RangeValidator ID="RangeValidatorDateAvailable" runat="server"
                ErrorMessage="Date must be between 01/01/2012 & 31/12/2012"
                MinimumValue="01/01/2012" MaximumValue="31/12/2012"
                ControlToValidate="txtDateAvailable" Type="Date"
                ForeColor="Red">
            </asp:RangeValidator>
        </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td colspan="2">
            <asp:Button ID="btnSave" runat="server" Text="Save" Width="100px"
                onclick="btnSave_Click" />
        </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td colspan="2">
            <asp:Label ID="lblStatus" runat="server" Font-Bold="true">
            </asp:Label>
        </td>
    </tr>
</table>

This pushes “Age is Required” error message to the correct. To correct this we’ve got set Display=”Dynamic”. This renders the error message with style display:none. If a tag has this style, it’ll not occupy space when not visible.
Code-Behind page code
:
protected void btnSave_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    if (Page.IsValid)
    {
        lblStatus.ForeColor = System.Drawing.Color.Green;
        lblStatus.Text = "Data Saved successfully";
    }
    else
    {
        lblStatus.ForeColor = System.Drawing.Color.Red;
        lblStatus.Text = "Validation Failed! Data not saved";
    }
}

Display property is supported by all validation controls

None – Error message not rendered and displayed next to the control. used to show the error message only within the ValidationSummary control

Static – The error message is displayed next to the control if validation fails. space is reserved on the page for the message although validation succeeds. The span tag is rendered with style visibility:hidden

Dynamic – The error message is displayed next to the control if validation fails. space isn’t reserved on the page for the message if the validation succeeds. The span tag is rendered with style display:none.

 

 

 



ASP.NET MVC 5 Hosting - ASPHostPortal :: How to Perform Code First Migration in MVC 5

clock July 16, 2014 08:39 by author Jervis

In today post, I will explain Code Migration in MVC application. This migration helps you to update and change the data model that you’ve created for application and you don't need to re-create or drop your database.

 

How to Apply Code First Migration

The data model in the database usually changes after developing the new application. When the data model changes, it becomes out of sync with the database. We've configured our Entity Framework in the app to drop and recreate the data model automatically. When any type of change is done in the entity classes or in the DbContext class, the existing database is deleted and the new database is created that matches the model and sees it with test data.

When the application runs in production, we do not want to lose everything each time we make changes like adding a column. The Code First Migration solved this problem by enabling the code first to update the database instead of dropping or recreating.

The procedure is following:

1. Disable the Database Initializer in the Web.Config file.

The following is the example:

<!--<contexts>

      <context type="Vag_Infotech.DAL.CollegeDbContext, Vag_Infotech">
        <databaseInitializer type="Vag_Infotech.DAL.CollegeDatabaseInitializer, Vag_Infotech"></databaseInitializer>
      </context>
</contexts>--> 

And also you need to change your Global.asax file:

// Database.SetInitializer(new CollegeDatabaseInitializer()); 

2. Change your database name in your web.config file:

<connectionStrings
  <add name="CollegeDbContext" connectionString="Data Source=(LocalDb)\v11.0;Initial Catalog=VInfotechNew;Integrated Security=SSPI" providerName="System.Data.SqlClient" />
</
connectionStrings> 

3. Open the Package Manager Console and enter this command:

enable-migration

add-migration InitialCreate 

Then, you will see the solution explorer below:

How to Edit Seed Method

Now, we add new code for updating our data model in this method. When we do not use the migration, the data model is dropped or re-created during the execution of the application each time, but now the data is retained after database changes.

Here are the steps to edit seed method:

1. Modify your configuration.cs file with this code:

namespace Vag_Infotech.Migrations
{
    using System;
    using System.Collections.Generic;
    using System.Data.Entity;
    using System.Data.Entity.Migrations;
    using System.Linq;
    using Vag_Infotech.Models;
 
    internal sealed class Configuration : DbMigrationsConfiguration<Vag_Infotech.DAL.CollegeDbContext>
    {
        public Configuration()
        {
            AutomaticMigrationsEnabled = false;
        }
 
        protected override void Seed(Vag_Infotech.DAL.CollegeDbContext context)
        {
            var New_Students = new List<Student>
            {
                new Student{FirstName="Louis",LastName="Fordsen",
                    EnrollmentDate=DateTime.Parse("2009-07-01")},
                new Student{FirstName="David ",LastName="Roger",
                    EnrollmentDate=DateTime.Parse("2009-07-01")},
                new Student{FirstName="Mike",LastName="Upson",
                    EnrollmentDate=DateTime.Parse("2009-07-05")},
            };
            New_Students.ForEach(ns => context.Students.AddOrUpdate(p => p.LastName, ns));
            context.SaveChanges();
 
            var New_Courses = new List<Course>
            {
                new Course{CourseID=201,Name="MCA",Credit=3,},
                new Course{CourseID=202,Name="M.Sc.IT",Credit=2,},
                new Course{CourseID=203,Name="M.Tech.CS",Credit=2,},
                new Course{CourseID=204,Name="M.Tech.IT",Credit=4,}
            };
            New_Courses.ForEach(ns => context.Courses.AddOrUpdate(p => p.Name, ns));
            context.SaveChanges();
 
            var New_Enrollments = new List<Enrollment>
            {
                new Enrollment{
                    StudentID= New_Students.Single(ns=>ns.FirstName=="Louis").ID,
                    CourseID=New_Courses.Single(nc=>nc.Name=="MCA").CourseID,
                    Grade=StudentGrade.A
                },
                new Enrollment{
                    StudentID= New_Students.Single(ns=>ns.FirstName=="David").ID,
                    CourseID=New_Courses.Single(nc=>nc.Name=="M.Tech.IT").CourseID,
                    Grade=StudentGrade.B
                },
                new Enrollment{
                    StudentID= New_Students.Single(ns=>ns.FirstName=="Mike").ID,
                    CourseID=New_Courses.Single(nc=>nc.Name=="M.Tech.CS").CourseID,
                    Grade=StudentGrade.D
                },
            };
 
            foreach (Enrollment et in New_Enrollments)
            {
                var NewEnrollDb = context.Enrollments.Where(
                    ns => ns.Student.ID == et.StudentID &&
                        ns.Course.CourseID == et.CourseID).SingleOrDefault();
                if (NewEnrollDb == null)
                {
                    context.Enrollments.Add(et);
                }
            }
            context.SaveChanges();
        }
    }
}

In the code above the Seed() takes the context object as an input argument and in the code the object is used to add the entities to the database. We can see how the code creates the collection for the database for each entity type and then saves it by SaveChanges() and adds it through the DbSet property. It is not necessary to call the SaveChanges() after each group of entities.

2. Build the solution

How to Execute the Migration

Here are steps:

1. Enter this command on Package Manager Console:

Update-database

2. Run the application and you’ll see the change



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