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ASP.NET 4.6 Hosting :: How to Solve Error "Could not create SSL/TLS secure channel"

clock July 18, 2019 07:01 by author Jervis

Yeap, ASP.NET Core 2.2 has been released and ASP.NET Core will release soon. But, there are many other users that still using previous ASP.NET version like ASP.NET 4.6. I just found in forum that people encounter error setting up SSL/TLS in .NET 4.6. The following is the error message

System.Net.WebException: The request was aborted: Could not create SSL/TLS secure channel

With SSL3 and TLS1.0 being deprecated, I figured this had to do with a version mismatch between the browser and the server. In fact, that was true. The reason why the security protocol didn’t default to TLS 1.2 in my application is because it was running on .NET 4.6.2, and in .NET 4.6x there is no default set for the security protocol. Also, it was running on a version of Windows (2012 R2) that didn’t have newer versions of TLS enabled by default.

One solution to this is to recompile your website either specifying a default or targeting .NET 4.7, which does have a default value of SecurityProtocolType.SystemDefault. According to the Microsoft .NET documentation, this setting “allows .NET Framework networking APIs based on SslStream (such as FTP, HTTP, and SMTP) to inherit the default security protocols from the operating system or from any custom configurations performed by a system administrator”. In my case, that may not have helped since the OS didn’t have TLS1.2 enabled.

Strong Cryptography Mode

I wasn’t able to recompile the application at the time, anyway, and so needed to find another way to fix the issue by reconfiguring the OS. In the end, I was able to fix the issue by enabling something called “strong cryptography mode” in Windows on the web server, which you can read more background about here.

To make the change, I simply had to run the two commands below in an elevated PowerShell prompt on the server. The first command is for x64 .NET and the second for x86 .NET.

Set-ItemProperty -Path 'HKLM:\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\Microsoft\.NetFramework\v4.0.30319' -Name 'SchUseStrongCrypto' -Value '1' -Type DWord

After those commands are run, you can run the following command to verify the setup:

[Net.ServicePointManager]::SecurityProtocol

This will list the enabled SSL/TLS protocols, which in my case now includes TLS12 (that is, TLS 1.2).

Finally, I simply reset IIS to restart my application, and I now no longer get the “Could not create SSL/TLS secure channel” exception and the API longer returns HTTP 500 responses!

Hope this helps!



ASP.NET Core Hosting :: How to Handle Multipart Request with JSON and File Uploads in ASP.NET Core

clock May 15, 2019 09:29 by author Jervis

Suppose we’re writing an API for a blog. Our "create post" endpoint should receive the title, body, tags and an image to display at the top of the post. This raises a question: how do we send the image? There are at least 3 options:

Embed the image bytes as base64 in the JSON payload, e.g.

{
    "title": "My first blog post",
    "body": "This is going to be the best blog EVER!!!!",
    "tags": [ "first post", "hello" ],
    "image": "iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUgAAAAUAAAAFCAYAAACNbyblAAAAHElEQVQI12P4//8/w38GIAXDIBKE0DHxgljNBAAO9TXL0Y4OHwAAAABJRU5ErkJggg=="
}

This works fine, but it’s probably not a very good idea to embed an arbitrarily long blob in JSON, because it could use a lot of memory if the image is very large.

Send the JSON and image as separate requests. Easy, but what if we want the image to be mandatory? There’s no guarantee that the client will send the image in a second request, so our post object will be in an invalid state.

Send the JSON and image as a multipart request.

The last approach seems the most appropriate; unfortunately it’s also the most difficult to support… There is no built-in support for this scenario in ASP.NET Core. There is some support for the multipart/form-data content type, though; for instance, we can bind a model to a multipart request body, like this:

public class MyRequestModel
{
    [Required]
    public string Title { get; set; }
    [Required]
    public string Body { get; set; }
    [Required]
    public IFormFile Image { get; set; }


public IActionResult Post([FromForm] MyRequestModel request)
{
    ...
}

But if we do this, it means that each property maps to a different part of the request; we’re completely giving up on JSON.

There’s also a MultipartReader class that we can use to manually decode the request, but it means we have to give up model binding and automatic model validation entirely.

Custom model binder

Ideally, we’d like to have a request model like this:

public class CreatePostRequestModel
{
    [Required]
    public string Title { get; set; }
    [Required]
    public string Body { get; set; }
    public string[] Tags { get; set; }
    [Required]
    public IFormFile Image { get; set; }
}

Where the TitleBody and Tags properties come from a form field containing JSON and the Image property comes from the uploaded file. In other words, the request would look like this:

POST /api/blog/post HTTP/1.1
Content-Type: multipart/form-data; boundary=AaB03x  

--AaB03x
Content-Disposition: form-data; name="json"
Content-Type: application/json  

{
    "title": "My first blog post",
    "body": "This is going to be the best blog EVER!!!!",
    "tags": [ "first post", "hello" ]
}
--AaB03x
Content-Disposition: form-data; name="image"; filename="image.jpg"
Content-Type: image/jpeg  

(... content of the image.jpg file ...)
--AaB03x

Fortunately, ASP.NET Core is very flexible, and we can actually make this work, by writing a custom model binder.

Here it is:

using System;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
using Microsoft.AspNetCore.Http;
using Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc;
using Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc.ModelBinding;
using Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc.ModelBinding.Binders;
using Microsoft.Extensions.Logging;
using Microsoft.Extensions.Options;
using Newtonsoft.Json; 

namespace TestMultipart.ModelBinding
{
    public class JsonWithFilesFormDataModelBinder : IModelBinder
    {
        private readonly IOptions<MvcJsonOptions> _jsonOptions;
        private readonly FormFileModelBinder _formFileModelBinder; 

        public JsonWithFilesFormDataModelBinder(IOptions<MvcJsonOptions> jsonOptions, ILoggerFactory loggerFactory)
        {
            _jsonOptions = jsonOptions;
            _formFileModelBinder = new FormFileModelBinder(loggerFactory);
        } 

        public async Task BindModelAsync(ModelBindingContext bindingContext)
        {
            if (bindingContext == null)
                throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(bindingContext)); 

            // Retrieve the form part containing the JSON
            var valueResult = bindingContext.ValueProvider.GetValue(bindingContext.FieldName);
            if (valueResult == ValueProviderResult.None)
            {
                // The JSON was not found
                var message = bindingContext.ModelMetadata.ModelBindingMessageProvider.MissingBindRequiredValueAccessor(bindingContext.FieldName);
                bindingContext.ModelState.TryAddModelError(bindingContext.ModelName, message);
                return;
            } 

            var rawValue = valueResult.FirstValue; 

            // Deserialize the JSON
            var model = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject(rawValue, bindingContext.ModelType, _jsonOptions.Value.SerializerSettings); 

            // Now, bind each of the IFormFile properties from the other form parts
            foreach (var property in bindingContext.ModelMetadata.Properties)
            {
                if (property.ModelType != typeof(IFormFile))
                    continue; 

                var fieldName = property.BinderModelName ?? property.PropertyName;
                var modelName = fieldName;
                var propertyModel = property.PropertyGetter(bindingContext.Model);
                ModelBindingResult propertyResult;
                using (bindingContext.EnterNestedScope(property, fieldName, modelName, propertyModel))
                {
                    await _formFileModelBinder.BindModelAsync(bindingContext);
                    propertyResult = bindingContext.Result;
                } 

                if (propertyResult.IsModelSet)
                {
                    // The IFormFile was sucessfully bound, assign it to the corresponding property of the model
                    property.PropertySetter(model, propertyResult.Model);
                }
                else if (property.IsBindingRequired)
                {
                    var message = property.ModelBindingMessageProvider.MissingBindRequiredValueAccessor(fieldName);
                    bindingContext.ModelState.TryAddModelError(modelName, message);
                }
            } 

            // Set the successfully constructed model as the result of the model binding
            bindingContext.Result = ModelBindingResult.Success(model);
        }


    }
}

To use it, just apply this attribute to the CreatePostRequestModel class above:

[ModelBinder(typeof(JsonWithFilesFormDataModelBinder), Name = "json")]}
public class CreatePostRequestModel

This tells ASP.NET Core to use our custom model binder to bind this class. The Name = "json" part tells our binder from which field of the multipart request it should read the JSON (this is the bindingContext.FieldName in the binder code).

Now we just need to pass a CreatePostRequestModel to our controller action, and we’re done:

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult<Post> CreatePost(CreatePostRequestModel post)
{
    ...
}

This approach enables us to have a clean controller code and keep the benefits of model binding and validation. It messes up the Swagger/OpenAPI model though, but hey, you can’t have everything!



ASP.NET Core Hosting :: How to Access HttpContext Outside of Framework Components in ASP.NET Core

clock March 13, 2019 08:44 by author Jervis

When developing web applications with ASP.NET, it is common to end up in situations where you require access to HttpContext. This wouldn’t be anything special, but outside of the context of framework level APIs such as controllers, middleware and so on (which would always give you a way to fetch the current HttpContext), it can be tricky.

While generally speaking, HttpContext could be passed around as a regular dependency to the logical components that require it, that solution is often impractical.

Let’s have a look at how you can get a hold of HttpContext in ASP.NET Core.

HttpContextAccessor

ASP.NET Core provides a convenience interface, IHttpContextAccessor (and it’s default implementation, HttpContextAccessor) in order to simplify accessing HttpContext. It must be registered at application startup inside the IServicesCollection and once it’s there, the framework will make sure that you can inject it anywhere you need, and use it to access the current instance of HttpContext.

services.AddSingleton<IHttpContextAccessor, HttpContextAccessor>();

HttpContextAccessor under the hood

So how does it work? Consider piece of code you can find in any ASP.NET Core template:

    public class Program
    {
        public static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var host = new WebHostBuilder()
                .UseKestrel()
                .UseContentRoot(Directory.GetCurrentDirectory())
                .UseStartup<Startup>()
                .Build(); 

            host.Run();
        }
    }

It provides the launch point of your application. This is going to start the server and boostrap all the necessary services, including building up the request processing pipeline from your Startup class.

Internally, in the process of that bootstrapping, that code will wire in the relevant server (Kestrel) and will create an instance of HostingApplication and pass into it an implementation of IHttpContextFactory (more on that later).

HostingApplication is an implementation of IHttpApplication which exposes three methods:

    public interface IHttpApplication<TContext>
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Create a TContext given a collection of HTTP features.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="contextFeatures">A collection of HTTP features to be used for creating the TContext.</param>
        /// <returns>The created TContext.</returns>
        TContext CreateContext(IFeatureCollection contextFeatures); 

        /// <summary>
        /// Asynchronously processes an TContext.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="context">The TContext that the operation will process.</param>
        Task ProcessRequestAsync(TContext context); 

        /// <summary>
        /// Dispose a given TContext.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="context">The TContext to be disposed.</param>
        /// <param name="exception">The Exception thrown when processing did not complete successfully, otherwise null.</param>
        void DisposeContext(TContext context, Exception exception);
    }

The server that we are using (say, Kestrel), on each incoming request, will use the above interface to call CreateContext and later on ProcessRequestAsync.

The former method is where IHttpContextFactory will be used to initialize HttpContext instance, and that instance will live throughout the lifetime of the HTTP request. The default implementation of IHttpContextFactory will look into the DI container, and check if IHttpContextAccessor is there. If it is, then it will “share” its HttpContext instance with the accessor.

The HttpContextAccessor will then store the HttpContext using System.Runtime.Remoting.Messaging.CallContext on desktop CLR and using System.Threading.AsyncLocal when built against .NET Standard.

If the accessor is not registered in the DI, then of course the context will not be saved anywhere. This is really important – and I have seen some questions already about that. If you just manually create an instance of HttpContextAccessor (which some people try), it will have no relationship to the HttpContextFactory or HttpContext, and the context will always be null. The accessor is merely a shortcut with a getter and setter, while all the logic of associating the HttpContext with the accessor instance is in HttpContextFactory.

And that’s basically how it works.

Injecting HttpContextAccessor

With all that set up, we could inject IHttpContextAccessor wherever we require access to the current instance of HttpContext. This of course means that your own components that rely on it, should be registered in/resolved from the IoC container too.

public class MyService
{
    private readonly IHttpContextAccessor _accessor; 

    public MyService(IHttpContextAccessor accessor)
    {
        _accessor = accessor;
    } 

    public void DoWork()
    {
        var context = _accessor.HttpContext;
        // continue with context instance
    }
}

Mimicking HttpContext.Current

One of the most infamous relicts of System.Web that is missing in ASP.NET Core is the static access to the current HttpContext.

I bet there is not a single ASP.NET developer, that, over the years, has not seen tons of programs, logic and extensions developed based on the magic and omnipresence of HttpContext.Current.

Now, trying to build your code around HttpContext.Current is really not a good idea, but I guess if you are migrating an enterprise type of app, with a lot of HttpContext.Current sprinkled around the business logic it may provide some temporary relief in terms of porting the application.

Our modern day HttpContext.Current would rely on resolving the context from IHttpContextAccessorand could look like this:

namespace System.Web
{
    public static class HttpContext
    {
        private static IHttpContextAccessor _contextAccessor; 

        public static Microsoft.AspNetCore.Http.HttpContext Current => _contextAccessor.HttpContext; 

        internal static void Configure(IHttpContextAccessor contextAccessor)
        {
            _contextAccessor = contextAccessor;
        }
    }
}

Notice, how we even placed it in System.Web namespace so that any potential migration you have is a bit easier.

We just need to add the code that will call into Configure as early as we can in the processing pipeline and pass in the IHttpContextAccessor. This can be achieved with two extension methods:

    public static class StaticHttpContextExtensions
    {
        public static void AddHttpContextAccessor(this IServiceCollection services)
        {
            services.AddSingleton<IHttpContextAccessor, HttpContextAccessor>();
        } 

        public static IApplicationBuilder UseStaticHttpContext(this IApplicationBuilder app)
        {
            var httpContextAccessor = app.ApplicationServices.GetRequiredService<IHttpContextAccessor>();
            System.Web.HttpContext.Configure(httpContextAccessor);
            return app;
        }
    }

The first one would be called from within ConfigureServices in your Startup and simply register the accessor in the DI. We have already established that this is necessary for the default IHttpContextFactory to share its instance of HttpContext correctly.

The second would be called from within Configure in your Startup, and it will make sure that our custom HttpContext.Current gets fed its IHttpContextAccessor so that it can work properly too.

And that’s it. Here is my Startup class which sets up the table for the static HttpContext.Current.

    public class Startup
    {
        public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
        {
            services.AddHttpContextAccessor();
        } 

        public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app)
        {
            app.UseStaticHttpContext();
            app.UseMvc();
        }
    }

And this is the rewritten example from above.

using System.Web; 

public class MyService
{
    public void DoWork()
    {
        var context = HttpContext.Current;
        // continue with context instance
    }
}

However, please think twice before going down that road.



ASP.NET Core Hosting :: How to Send and Receive Email in ASP.NET Core Using Mailkit

clock February 18, 2019 07:36 by author Jervis

Creating An Email Service

It’s always good practice that when you add in a new library, that you build an abstraction on top of it. If we take MailKit as an example, what if MailKit is later superceded by a better emailing library? Will we have to change references all over our code to reference this new library? Or maybe MailKit has to make a breaking change between versions, will we then have to go through our code fixing all the now broken changes?

Another added bonus to creating an abstraction is that it allows us to map out how we want our service to look before we worry about implementation details. We can take a very high level view of sending an email for instance without having to worry about exactly how MailKit works. Because there is a lot of code to get through, I won’t do too much explaining at this point, we will just run through it. Let’s go!

First, let’s go ahead and create an EmailAddress class. This will have only two properties that describe an EmailAddress.

public class EmailAddress
{
                public string Name { get; set; }
                public string Address { get; set; }
}

Now we will need something to describe a simple EmailMessage. There are a tonne of properties on an email, for example attachments, CC, BCC, headers etc but we will break it down to the basics for now. Containing all of this within a class means that we can add extra properties as we need them later on.

public class EmailMessage
{
                public EmailMessage()
                {
                                ToAddresses = new List<EmailAddress>();
                                FromAddresses = new List<EmailAddress>();
               

                public List<EmailAddress> ToAddresses { get; set; }
                public List<EmailAddress> FromAddresses { get; set; }
                public string Subject { get; set; }
                public string Content { get; set; }
}

Now we need to setup our email configuration. That’s our SMTP servers, ports, credentials etc. For this we will make a simple settings class to hold all of this. Since we are good programmers we will use an interface too!

public interface IEmailConfiguration
{
                string SmtpServer { get; }
                int SmtpPort { get; }
                string SmtpUsername { get; set; }
                string SmtpPassword { get; set; } 

                string PopServer { get; }
                int PopPort { get; }
                string PopUsername { get; }
                string PopPassword { get; }


public class EmailConfiguration : IEmailConfiguration
{
                public string SmtpServer { get; set; }
                public int SmtpPort  { get; set; }
                public string SmtpUsername { get; set; }
                public string SmtpPassword { get; set; } 

                public string PopServer { get; set; }
                public int PopPort { get; set; }
                public string PopUsername { get; set; }
                public string PopPassword { get; set; }
}

Now we actually need to load this configuration into our app. In your appsettings.json, you need to add a section at the root for email settings. It should look something like this :

{
  "EmailConfiguration": {
    "SmtpServer": "smtp.myserver.com",
    "SmtpPort": 465,
    "SmtpUsername": "smtpusername",
    "SmtpPassword": "smtppassword", 

    "PopServer": "popserver",
    "PopPort": 995,
    "PopUsername": "popusername",
    "PopPassword" :  "poppassword"
  }
  ....Other settings here...
}

In the ConfigureServices method or your startup.cs, we can now pull out this configuration and load it into our app with a single line.

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
                services.AddMvc();

services.AddSingleton<IEmailConfiguration>(Configuration.GetSection("EmailConfiguration").Get<EmailConfiguration>());
}

This allows us to inject our configuration class anywhere in our app.

The final piece of the puzzle is a simple email service that can be used to send and receive email. Let’s create an interface and an implementation that’s empty for now. The implementation should accept our settings object as a constructor.

public interface IEmailService
{
                void Send(EmailMessage emailMessage);
                List<EmailMessage> ReceiveEmail(int maxCount = 10);


public class EmailService : IEmailService
{
                private readonly IEmailConfiguration _emailConfiguration;

                public EmailService(IEmailConfiguration emailConfiguration)
                {
                                _emailConfiguration = emailConfiguration;
               

                public List<EmailMessage> ReceiveEmail(int maxCount = 10)
                {
                                throw new NotImplementedException();
               

                public void Send(EmailMessage emailMessage)
                {
                                throw new NotImplementedException();
                }
}

Head back to our ConfigureServices method of our startup.cs to add in a final line to inject in our EmailService everywhere.

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
                services.AddMvc();
services.AddSingleton<IEmailConfiguration>(Configuration.GetSection("EmailConfiguration").Get<EmailConfiguration>());
                services.AddTransient<IEmailService, EmailService>();
}

Phew! And we are done. If at this point we decided MailKit isn’t for us, we still have an email service that can swap in and out libraries as it needs to, and our calling application doesn’t need to worry about what’s going on under the hood. That’s the beauty of abstracting a library away!

Getting Started With MailKit

Getting started with MailKit is as easy as installing a Nuget package. Simply run the following from your Package Manager Console :

Install-Package MailKit

And hey presto! You now have access to MailKit in your application

Sending Email via SMTP With MailKit

Let’s head back to our email service class and fill out the “Send” method with the actual code to send an email via MailKit. The code to do this is below :

public void Send(EmailMessage emailMessage)
{
                var message = new MimeMessage();
                message.To.AddRange(emailMessage.ToAddresses.Select(x => new MailboxAddress(x.Name, x.Address)));
                message.From.AddRange(emailMessage.FromAddresses.Select(x => new MailboxAddress(x.Name, x.Address))); 

                message.Subject = emailMessage.Subject;
                //We will say we are sending HTML. But there are options for plaintext etc.
                message.Body = new TextPart(TextFormat.Html)
                {
                                Text = emailMessage.Content
                }; 

                //Be careful that the SmtpClient class is the one from Mailkit not the framework!
                using (var emailClient = new SmtpClient())
                {
                                //The last parameter here is to use SSL (Which you should!)
                                emailClient.Connect(_emailConfiguration.SmtpServer, _emailConfiguration.SmtpPort, true); 

                                //Remove any OAuth functionality as we won't be using it.
                                emailClient.AuthenticationMechanisms.Remove("XOAUTH2"); 

                                emailClient.Authenticate(_emailConfiguration.SmtpUsername, _emailConfiguration.SmtpPassword); 

                                emailClient.Send(message);
                                emailClient.Disconnect(true);
                }                             

}

The comments should be pretty self explanatory, but let’s quickly run through it.

  • You can send clear text or HTML emails depending on the “TextFormat” you use when creating your message body
  • MailKit has named it’s Smtp class “SmtpClient” which is the same as the framework class. Be careful if you are using Resharper and the like that when you click “Add Reference” you are adding the correct reference.
  • You should choose to use SSL whenever available when connecting to the SMTP Server

Because we built out our EmailService, EmailMessage and EmailConfiguration classes earlier, they are all ready to be used immediately!

Receiving Email via POP With MailKit

And now the code to receive email via POP.

public List<EmailMessage> ReceiveEmail(int maxCount = 10)
{
                using (var emailClient = new Pop3Client())
                {
                                emailClient.Connect(_emailConfiguration.PopServer, _emailConfiguration.PopPort, true); 

                                emailClient.AuthenticationMechanisms.Remove("XOAUTH2"); 

                                emailClient.Authenticate(_emailConfiguration.PopUsername, _emailConfiguration.PopPassword); 

                                List<EmailMessage> emails = new List<EmailMessage>();
                                for(int i=0; i < emailClient.Count && i < maxCount; i++)
                                {
                                                var message = emailClient.GetMessage(i);
                                                var emailMessage = new EmailMessage
                                                {
                                                                Content = !string.IsNullOrEmpty(message.HtmlBody) ? message.HtmlBody : message.TextBody,
                                                                Subject = message.Subject
                                                };
                                                emailMessage.ToAddresses.AddRange(message.To.Select(x => (MailboxAddress)x).Select(x => new EmailAddress { Address = x.Address, Name = x.Name }));
                                                emailMessage.FromAddresses.AddRange(message.From.Select(x => (MailboxAddress)x).Select(x => new EmailAddress { Address = x.Address, Name = x.Name }));
                               

                                return emails;
                }
}

Again, all rather straight forward.

While we only retrieve a few basic details about the email message, the actual MailKit email object has a tonne of data you can inspect including headers, CC addresses, etc. Extend as you need to!



ASP.NET Hosting :: Alternative Localization for Asp.Net Core Applications

clock January 16, 2019 10:41 by author Jervis

Asp.Net Core Built-In Support

This is code fragment from official documentation how to localize content using built-in functionality.

App Content Localization

[Route("api/[controller]")]
public class AboutController : Controller
{
    private readonly IStringLocalizer<AboutController> _localizer;

    public AboutController(IStringLocalizer<AboutController> localizer)
    {
        _localizer = localizer;
    }

    [HttpGet]
    public string Get()
    {
        return _localizer["About Title"];
    }
}

And if you are working with Html content that shouldn't be escaped during rendering - you are using IHtmlLocalizerimplementation that returns LocalizedHtmlString instance.

public class BookController : Controller
{
    private readonly IHtmlLocalizer<BookController> _localizer;

    public BookController(IHtmlLocalizer<BookController> localizer)
    {
        _localizer = localizer;
    }

    public IActionResult Hello(string name)
    {
        ViewData["Message"] = _localizer["<b>Hello</b><i> {0}</i>", name];

        return View();
    }
}

View Localization

For the view localization - there is another injectable interface IViewLocalizer.

@inject IViewLocalizer Localizer

@{
    ViewData["Title"] = Localizer["About"];
}

Alternative: Strongly-Typed DbLocalizationProvider

Where is my problem with built-in providers? They all are "stringly-typed". You have to provide string as either key or translation of the resource. I'm somehow more confident strongly-typed approach where I can use "Find All Usages", "Rename" or do any other static code operation that's would not be entirely possible in built-in approach.

Over the time I've been busy developing alternative localization provider for Asp.Net and Episerver (it's brilliant content management system) platforms specifically.

Thought getting that over to Asp.Net Core should not be hard. And it wasn't. So here we are - DbLocalizationProviderfor Asp.Net Core.

Getting Started

There are couple of things to setup first, before you will be able to start using strongly-typed localization provider.

First, you need to install the package (it will pull down other dependencies also).

PM> Install-Package LocalizationProvider.AspNetCore

Second you need to setup/configure services.
In your Startup.cs class you need to stuff related to Mvc localization (to get required services into DI container - service collection).

And then services.AddDbLocalizationProvider(). You can pass in configuration settings class and setup provider's behavior.

public class Startup
{
    public Startup(IConfiguration configuration)
    {
        Configuration = configuration;
    }

    public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
    {
        services.AddLocalization();

        services.AddMvc()
                .AddViewLocalization()
                .AddDataAnnotationsLocalization();

        services.AddDbLocalizationProvider(cfg =>
        {
            cfg...
        });
    }
}

After then you will need to make sure that you start using the provider:

public class Startup
{
    public Startup(IConfiguration configuration)
    {
        Configuration = configuration;
    }

    public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
    {
        ...
    }

    public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app, IHostingEnvironment env)
    {
        ...

        app.UseDbLocalizationProvider();
    }
}

Using localization provider will make sure that resources are discovered and registered in the database (if this process will not be disabled via AddDbLocalizationProvider() method).

App Content Localization

Localizing application content via IStringLocalizer<T> is similar as that would be done for regular Asp.Net applications.

You have to define resource container type:

[LocalizedResource]
public class SampleResources
{
    public string PageHeader => "This is page header";
}

Then you can demand IStringLocalizer<T> is any place you need that one (f.ex. in controller):

public class HomeController : Controller
{
    private readonly IStringLocalizer<SampleResources> _localizer;

    public HomeController(IStringLocalizer<SampleResources> localizer)
    {
        _localizer = localizer;
    }

    public IActionResult Index()
    {
        var smth = _localizer.GetString(r => r.PageHeader);
        return View();
    }
}

As you can see - you are able to use nice strongly-typed access to the resource type: _localizer.GetString(r => r.PageHeader);.

Even if you demanded strongly-typed localizer with specified container type T, it's possible to use also general/shared static resources:

[LocalizedResource]
public class SampleResources
{
    public static string SomeCommonText => "Hello World!";
    public string PageHeader => "This is page header";
}

public class HomeController : Controller
{
    private readonly IStringLocalizer<SampleResources> _localizer;

    public HomeController(IStringLocalizer<SampleResources> localizer)
    {
        _localizer = localizer;
    }

    public IActionResult Index()
    {
        var smth = _localizer.GetString(() => SampleResources.SomeCommonText);
        return View();
    }
}

View Localization

Regarding the views, story here is exactly the same - all built-in approach is supported:

@model UserViewModel
@inject IViewLocalizer Localizer
@inject IHtmlLocalizer<SampleResources> HtmlLocalizer

@Localizer.GetString(() => SampleResources.SomeCommonText)
@HtmlLocalizer.GetString(r => r.PageHeader)

Data Annotations

Supported. Sample:

[LocalizedModel]
public class UserViewModel
{
    [Display(Name = "User name:")]
    [Required(ErrorMessage = "Name of the user is required!")]
    public string UserName { get; set; }

    [Display(Name = "Password:")]
    [Required(ErrorMessage = "Password is kinda required :)")]
    public string Password { get; set; }
}

View.cshtml:

@model UserViewModel

<form asp-controller="Home" asp-action="Index" method="post">
    <div>
        <label asp-for="UserName"></label>
        <input asp-for="UserName"/>
        <span asp-validation-for="UserName"></span>
    </div>
    <div>
        <label asp-for="Password"></label>
        <input asp-for="Password" type="password"/>
        <span asp-validation-for="Password"></span>
    </div>
    ...
</form>

Localization in Libraries

You can either rely on IStringLocalizer implementation that's coming from Microsoft.Extensions.Localizationnamespace and demand that one in your injections:

using Microsoft.Extensions.Localization;
public class MyService
{
    public MyService(IStringLocalizer localizer)
    {
       ...
    }
}

Or you can also depend on LocalizationProvider class defined in DbLocalizationProvider namespace:

using DbLocalizationProvider;
public class MyService
{
    public MyService(LocalizationProvider provider)
    {
       ...
    }
}

Both of these types provide similar functionality in terms how to retrieve localized content.

Changing Culture

Sometimes you need to get translation for other language and not primary UI one.
This is possible either via built-in method:

@inject IHtmlLocalizer<SampleResources> Localizer

Localizer.WithCulture(new CultureInfo("no"))
         .GetString(() => SampleResources.SomeCommonText)

Or via additional extension method:

@inject IHtmlLocalizer<SampleResources> Localizer
Localizer.GetStringByCulture(() => SampleResources.SomeCommonText, new Culture("no"))

Stringly-Typed Localization

For backward compatibility or even if you wanna go hardcore and supply resource keys manually (for reasons) stingly-typed interface is also supported:

using Microsoft.Extensions.Localization;

public class MyService
{
    public MyService(IStringLocalizer localizer)
    {
       var header = localizer["MyProject.Resources.Header"];
    }
}

 



ASP.NET Hosting :: How to Setup URL Redirection

clock November 15, 2018 07:07 by author Jervis

We have so many clients asking about this issue. So, we decide to write this tutorial and hope this information can help other people too. In this review, we will write simple tutorial about how to setup http/https redirection in IIS.

There are lots of routing options accessible in ASP.NET but still it comes a time when you need to manipulate a URL and manipulating it outside a code comes handy. When this happens, the best you can do id to use IIS Rewrite Module. Transforming various URL’s out of code enables you to do various things including performing redirections for archive or transferred content without interfering with the code, you can easily implement SEO optimizations and tweaks quickly and easily without code and many more. Below is a collection of useful IIS rewrite rules that will help you understand IIS rewrites.

Useful IIS Rewrite Rules

Adding www Prefix

This is a basic rule that adds prefix “www” to any URL you need. This is a requirement for SEO.

Redirection from Domain 1 to Domain 2

This rule comes handy when you change the name of your site or may be when you need to catch and alias and direct it to your main site. If the new and the old URLs share some elements, then you could just use this rule to have the matching pattern together with the redirect target being.

HTTPS/HTTP Redirection

Redirecting users from HTTP to HTTPS is one of the reasons that you need to apply useful IIS rewrite rules. It can lead to conditional statements while looking for dev/test mode in your code. This rules allows you to handle the redirection without much statements which is tidier.

There is a pair of rules in this case each for one of the two ways. In both the rules, a check is performed to verify that the protocol used is http/https. The rules work on the same URL patterns or the similar lists of pages to match. For the redirect to HTTP, it is not about matching the pages; it is a reverse of the first rule and usually have a number of .NET/site paths that are excluded.

Setup Redirection Using IIS

Above steps is to setup URL redirection via your code. But, if you manage your own server, you can also setup redirection via IIS. The following is the steps

1. Download and install the “URL Rewrite” module.

2. Open the “IIS Manager” console and select the website you would like to apply the redirection to in the left-side menu:



3. Double-click on the “URL Rewrite” icon.

4. Click “Add Rule(s)” in the right-side menu.

5. Select “Blank Rule” in the “Inbound” section, then press “OK”:

6. Enter any rule name you wish.

7. In the “Match URL” section:

- Select “Matches the Pattern” in the “Requested URL” drop-down menu 
- Select “Regular Expressions” in the “Using” drop-down menu 
- Enter the following pattern in the “Match URL” section: “(.*)” 
- Check the “Ignore case” box

 

 

8. In the “Conditions” section, select “Match all” under the “Logical Grouping” drop-down menu and press “Add”.

9. In the prompted window:

- Enter “{HTTPS}” as a condition input 
- Select “Matches the Pattern” from the drop-down menu 
- Enter “^OFF$” as a pattern 
- Press “OK”

10. In the “Action” section, select “Redirect” as the action type and specify the following for “Redirect URL”:

https://{HTTP_HOST}/{R:1}

11. Check the “Append query string” box.

12.Select the Redirection Type of your choice. The whole “Action” section should look like this:

 

NOTE: There are 4 redirect types of the redirect rule that can be selected in that menu: 

- Permanent (301) – preferable type in this case, which tells clients that the content of the site is permanently moved to the HTTPS version. Good for SEO, as it brings all the traffic to your HTTPS website making a positive effect on its ranking in search engines. 
- Found (302) – should be used only if you moved the content of certain pages to a new place *temporarily*. This way the SEO traffic goes in favour of the previous content’s location. This option is generally not recommended for a HTTP/HTTPS redirect. 
- See Other (303) – specific redirect type for GET requests. Not recommended for HTTP/HTTPS. 
- Temporary (307) – HTTP/1.1 successor of 302 redirect type. Not recommended for HTTP/HTTPS.

13. Click on “Apply” on the right side of the “Actions” menu.

The redirect can be checked by accessing your site via http:// specified in the URL. To make sure that your browser displays not the cached version of your site, you can use anonymous mode of the browser.

The rule is created in IIS, but the site is still not redirected to https://

Normally, the redirection rule gets written into the web.config file located in the document root directory of your website. If the redirection does not work for some reason, make sure that web.config exists and check if it contains the appropriate rule.

To do this, follow these steps:

1. In the sites list of IIS, right-click on your site. Choose the “Explore” option:

 

2. “Explore” will open the document root directory of the site. Check if the web.config file is there.

3. The web.config file must have the following code block:

<configuration> 
<system.webServer> 
<rewrite> 
<rules> 
<rule name="HTTPS force" enabled="true" stopProcessing="true"> 
<match url="(.*)" /> 
<conditions> 
<add input="{HTTPS}" pattern="^OFF$" /> 
</conditions> 
<action type="Redirect" url="https://{HTTP_HOST}/{R:1}" redirectType="Permanent" /> 
</rule> 
</rules> 
</rewrite> 
</system.webServer> 
</configuration>

4. If the web.config file is missing, you can create a new .txt file, put the aforementioned code there, save and then rename the file to web.config.

 

 



ASP.NET Hosting - ASPHostPortal.com :: JavaScript style setTimeout and setInterval in C#

clock January 31, 2017 05:05 by author Armend

I found JavaScript setTimeout and setInterval functions quite handy for timer like functionality and some time wish I could use that in C# too. In an earlier post I create a C# like timer functionality in JavaScript. Now, I want to do opposite i.e. implement JavaScript setTimeout and setInterval like functionality in C#.
This is can be done very easily using Lamda expressions and Timer. Look at the below utility class -

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
namespace DailyCoding.EasyTimer
{
    public static class EasyTimer
    {
        public static IDisposable SetInterval(Action method, int delayInMilliseconds)
        {
            System.Timers.Timer timer = new System.Timers.Timer(delayInMilliseconds);
            timer.Elapsed += (source, e) =>
            {
                method();
            };

            timer.Enabled = true;
            timer.Start();

            // Returns a stop handle which can be used for stopping
            // the timer, if required
            return timer as IDisposable;
        }

        public static IDisposable SetTimeout(Action method, int delayInMilliseconds)
        {
            System.Timers.Timer timer = new System.Timers.Timer(delayInMilliseconds);
            timer.Elapsed += (source, e) =>
            {
                method();
            };

            timer.AutoReset = false;
            timer.Enabled = true;
            timer.Start();

            // Returns a stop handle which can be used for stopping
            // the timer, if required
            return timer as IDisposable;
        }
    }
}

To use setTimeout this you can simply do -

EasyTimer.SetTimeout(() =>
{
    // --- You code here ---
    // This piece of code will once after 1000 ms delay

}, 1000);

The code will run after 1000 ms delay similarly like JavaScript setTimeout. The function also returns a handle. If you want clearTimeout like functionality, then the simply dispose off the handle.

var stopHandle = EasyTimer.SetTimeout(() =>
{
    // --- You code here ---
    // This piece of code will once after 1000 ms

}, 1000);


// In case you want to clear the timeout

stopHandle.Dispose();
Similarly you can use setInterval as -
EasyTimer.SetInterval(() =>
{
    // --- You code here ---
    // This piece of code will run after every 1000 ms

}, 1000);

and SetInterval also returns a stop handle which you can use for clearInterval like functionality. Just dispose off the handle -

var stopHandle = EasyTimer.SetInterval(() =>
    {
        // --- You code here ---
        // This piece of code will run after every 1000 ms
        // To stop the timer, just dispose off the stop handle

    }, 1000);


// In case you want to clear the interval
stopHandle.Dispose();

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ASP.NET Hosting - ASPHostPortal.com :: Simple Steps to Render ASP.NET MVC Layout

clock January 27, 2017 06:56 by author Dan

According to dotnettrick website. In Asp.Net MVC, Layouts are like as Master Pages in Asp.Net Web Forms. These helps us to maintain consistent look and feel across all the views within your Asp.Net MVC application. Like Master Pages, Layout may contains common CSS, jQuery files across the multiple Views and one or more placeholders for which Views provide content. For layout and its components refer this article Layouts, RenderBody, RenderSection and RenderPage in ASP.NET MVC.

In Asp.Net MVC, at application level we have _ViewStart file with in Views folder for defining the default Layout page for your Asp.Net MVC application. In this article, I am going to expose the different ways to apply layout pages for your application. Suppose we have to render the layouts as shown in the fig. by using various ways.

Method 1 : Control Layouts rendering by using _ViewStart file in the root directory of the Views folder

We can change the default rendering of layouts with in _ViewStart file by using the below code:

    @{
     var controller = HttpContext.Current.Request.RequestContext.RouteData.Values["Controller"].ToString();
    
     string layout = "";
     if (controller == "Admin")
     {
     layout = "~/Views/Shared/_AdminLayout.cshtml";
     }
     else
     {
     layout = "~/Views/Shared/_Layout.cshtml";
     }
    
     Layout = layout;
    }

Method 2 : Return Layout from ActionResult

We can also override the default layout rendering by returning the layout from the ActionResult by using the below code:

    public ActionResult Index()
    {
     RegisterModel model = new RegisterModel();
     //TO DO:
     return View("Index", "_AdminLayout", model);
    }

Method 3 : Define Layout with in each view on the top

We can also override the default layout rendering by defining the layout on the view by using the below code:

    @{
     Layout = "~/Views/Shared/_AdminLayout.cshtml";
    }

Method 4 : Adding _ViewStart file in each of the directories

We can also set the default layout for a particular directory by putting _ViewStart file in each of the directories with the required Layout information as shown below:


    @{
     Layout = "~/Views/Shared/_AdminLayout.cshtml";
    }

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ASP.NET Hosting - ASPHostPortal.com :: Dynamically from code behind in asp.net using C#

clock January 24, 2017 11:50 by author Armend

In this example we explain that how to change CSS dynamically from code behind in asp.net using C#. or how to change CSS file programmatically in C# code(back end  code) in asp.net. Some time we have requirement like if user click on or check Lightweight button then Lightweight CSS is apply to the application for these user only same like if user checked or click on Professional button then Professional look is applied to the application for these user only these totally is dynamic and depend on user requirement.


So how to change or switch CSS file dynamically from code behind in asp.net using C#.

ChangeCSSFileDynamically.aspx:


<%@ Page Language="C#" AutoEventWireup="true" CodeBehind="ChangeCSSFileDynamically.aspx.cs"
Inherits="WebApplication1.ChangeCSSFileDynamically" %>

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head id="Head1" runat="server">
    <title>Dynamically change (switch) CSS file programmatically from code behind in ASP.Net</title>
    <link id="lnkCSS" runat="server" href="~/CSS/Lightweight.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" />
</head>
<body>
    <form id="form1" runat="server">
    <asp:Label ID="Label1" runat="server" Text="This is a Label" CssClass="label"></asp:Label>
    <hr />
    <asp:RadioButton ID="chkLightWeight" runat="server" GroupName="CSSTheme" AutoPostBack="true" Text="LightWeight"
        OnCheckedChanged="chkLightWeight_CheckedChanged1" />
    <asp:RadioButton ID="chkProfessional" runat="server" GroupName="CSSTheme" AutoPostBack="true" Text="Professional"
        OnCheckedChanged="chkProfessional_CheckedChanged1" />
    </form>
</body>
</html>

ChangeCSSFileDynamically.aspx.cs:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Web;
using System.Web.UI;
using System.Web.UI.WebControls;

namespace WebApplication1
{
    public partial class ChangeCSSFileDynamically : System.Web.UI.Page
    {

        protected void chkLightWeight_CheckedChanged1(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            lnkCSS.Attributes["href"] = "~/CSS/Lightweight.css";
        }

        protected void chkProfessional_CheckedChanged1(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            lnkCSS.Attributes["href"] = "~/CSS/Professional.css";
        }
    }
}

Lightweight.css:

body
{
    font-family:Times New Roman;
    font-size:10pt;
}
.label
{
    font-weight:bold;
    color:Purple;
}

Professional.css:

body
{
    font-family:Arial;
    font-size:bold;
}
.label
{
    font-weight:bold;
    color:yellow;
}

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ASP.NET Hosting -ASPHostPortal.con :: How to Use Complex Number in ASP.NET

clock January 22, 2017 18:47 by author Dan

According to dailydotnettips website. Complex numbers are not new to numeral system. A complex number contains one real part and another imaginary part. We can easily implement such a Type, but with .NET 4.0 System.Numerics.dll contains a new Type (struct) called Complex which deals with Complex numbers .

You can represent a number in Complex form very easily using Complex type.
Lets see how :
   
Complex c = new Complex(4.4, 3.1);
Console.WriteLine(c);


You can even specify like this :
   
Complex c = 35.302;
Console.WriteLine(c);


Or like this :
   
Complex c = (Complex)35.302m;
Console.WriteLine(c);


So everything is taken care automatically. You can also use FromPolarCoordinates to take a complex number from its polar co-ordinates.
   
Complex c = Complex.FromPolarCoordinates(39.454834, 2.548454);
Console.WriteLine(c);


You can get each component of a Complex number using properties associated with it.

Real : Represents the Real part of the Number.
Imaginary : Represents the Imaginary part of the number.
Magintude : Gets the absolute value of the Complex number
Phase : Gets the phase of the complex number.

The complex number also exposes some of the important methods :

Conjugate
Log
Reciprocal
Sqrt (Square Root) etc.


For more information about Complex numbers please refer ComplexNumber
Hope you like this post.
Happy Coding.

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Cheap ASP.NET 4.5 Hosting

We’re a company that works differently to most. Value is what we output and help our customers achieve, not how much money we put in the bank. It’s not because we are altruistic. It’s based on an even simpler principle. "Do good things, and good things will come to you".

Success for us is something that is continually experienced, not something that is reached. For us it is all about the experience – more than the journey. Life is a continual experience. We see the Internet as being an incredible amplifier to the experience of life for all of us. It can help humanity come together to explode in knowledge exploration and discussion. It is continual enlightenment of new ideas, experiences, and passions


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