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ASP.NET Core 2 Hosting - How to Use Bootstrap 4 in ASP.NET Core

clock July 31, 2018 08:47 by author Kenny

 So although you can still use it right now, Bootstrap has also announced to drop support for it. As a result, the built-in ASP.NET Core templates are slowly being edited to move away from it too.

Unfortunately, there is no clear path forward. This is mostly due to the fact that web applications are continuously moving further into the client-side, requiring complex client-side build systems and many dependencies. So if you are building something like that, you might already know how to solve this then, and you can expand your existing build process to simply also include Bootstrap and jQuery there.

But there are still many web applications out there that are not that heavy on the client-side, where the application still runs mainly on the server and the server serves static views as a result. Bower previously filled this by making it easy to just publish client-side dependencies without that much of a process.

In the .NET world we also have NuGet and with previous ASP.NET versions, we could use NuGet as well to add dependencies to some client-side dependencies since NuGet would just place the content into our project correctly. Unfortunately, with the new .csproj format and the new NuGet, installed packages are located outside of our project, so we cannot simply reference those.

This leaves us with a few options how to add our dependencies:

One-time installation

This is what the ASP.NET Core templates, that are not single-page applications, are currently doing. When you use those to create a new application, the wwwroot folder simply contains a folder lib that contains the dependencies:

If you look closely at the files currently, you can see that they were originally placed there with Bower to create the template, but that is likely to change soon. The basic idea is that the files are copied once to the wwwroot folder so you can depend on them.

To do this, we can simply follow Bootstrap’s introduction and download the compiled files directly. As mentioned on the download site, this does not include jQuery, so we need to download that separately too; it does contain Popper.js though if we choose to use the bootstrap.bundle file later—which we will do. For jQuery, we can simply get a single "compressed, production" file from the download site.

This leaves us with a few files which will simply extract and copy into the wwwroot folder. We can also make a lib folder to make it clearer that these are external dependencies:

That’s all we need, so now we just need to adjust our _Layout.cshtml file to include those dependencies. For that, we add the following block to the <head>:

<environment include="Development">
<link rel="stylesheet" href="~/lib/css/bootstrap.css" />
</environment>
<environment exclude="Development">
<link rel="stylesheet" href="~/lib/css/bootstrap.min.css" />
</environment>

And the following block at the very end of the <body>:

<environment include="Development">
<script src="~/lib/js/jquery-3.3.1.js"></script>
<script src="~/lib/js/bootstrap.bundle.js"></script>
</environment>
<environment exclude="Development">
<script src="~/lib/js/jquery-3.3.1.min.js"></script>
<script src="~/lib/js/bootstrap.bundle.min.js"></script>
</environment>

You can also just include the minified versions and skip the <environment> tag helpers here to make it a bit simpler. But that’s all you need to do to keep you starting.

Dependencies from NPM

The more modern way, also if you want to keep your dependencies updated, would be to get the dependencies from the NPM package repository. You can use either NPM or Yarn for this; in my example, I’ll use NPM.

To start off, we need to create a package.json file for our project, so we can specify our dependencies. To do this, we simply do that from the "Add New Item" dialog:

Once we have that, we need to edit it to include our dependencies. It should something look like this:

{
"version": "1.0.0",
"name": "asp.net",
"private": true,
"devDependencies": {
"bootstrap": "4.0.0",
"jquery": "3.3.1",
"popper.js": "1.12.9"
}
}

By saving, Visual Studio will already run NPM to install the dependencies for us. They will be installed into the node_modules folder. So what is left to do is to get the files from there into our wwwroot folder. There are a few options to do that:

bundleconfig.json for bundling and minification

We can use one of the various ways to consume a bundleconfig.json for bundling and minification, as explained in the documentation. A very easy way is to simply use the BuildBundlerMinifier NuGet package which automatically sets up a build task for this.

After installing that package, we need to create a bundleconfig.json at the root of the project with the following contents:

[
{
"outputFileName": "wwwroot/vendor.min.css",
"inputFiles": [
"node_modules/bootstrap/dist/css/bootstrap.min.css"
],
"minify": { "enabled": false }
},
{
"outputFileName": "wwwroot/vendor.min.js",
"inputFiles": [
"node_modules/jquery/dist/jquery.min.js",
"node_modules/popper.js/dist/umd/popper.min.js",
"node_modules/bootstrap/dist/js/bootstrap.min.js"
],
"minify": { "enabled": false }
}
]

This basically configures which files to combine into what. And when we build, we can see that the vendor.min.css and vendor.js.css are created correctly. So all we need to do is to adjust our _Layouts.html again to include those files:

<!-- inside <head> -->
<link rel="stylesheet" href="~/vendor.min.css" />
<!-- at the end of <body> -->
<script src="~/vendor.min.js"></script>

Using a task manager like Gulp

If we want to move a bit more into client-side development, we can also start to use tools that we would use there. For example Webpack which is a very commonly used build tool for really everything. But we can also start with a simpler task manager like Gulp and do the few necessary steps ourselves.

For that, we add a gulpfile.js into our project root, with the following contents:

const gulp = require('gulp');
const concat = require('gulp-concat');
const vendorStyles = [
"node_modules/bootstrap/dist/css/bootstrap.min.css"
];
const vendorScripts = [
"node_modules/jquery/dist/jquery.min.js",
"node_modules/popper.js/dist/umd/popper.min.js",
"node_modules/bootstrap/dist/js/bootstrap.min.js",
];
gulp.task('default', ['build-vendor']);
gulp.task('build-vendor', ['build-vendor-css', 'build-vendor-js']);
gulp.task('build-vendor-css', () => {
return gulp.src(vendorStyles)
.pipe(concat('vendor.min.css'))
.pipe(gulp.dest('wwwroot'));
});
gulp.task('build-vendor-js', () => {
return gulp.src(vendorScripts)
.pipe(concat('vendor.min.js'))
.pipe(gulp.dest('wwwroot'));
});

Now, we also need to adjust our package.json to have dependencies on gulp and gulp-concat:

{
"version": "1.0.0",
"name": "asp.net",
"private": true,
"devDependencies": {
"bootstrap": "4.0.0",
"gulp": "^3.9.1",
"gulp-concat": "^2.6.1",
"jquery": "3.3.1",
"popper.js": "1.12.9"
}
}

Finally, we edit our .csproj to add the following task which makes sure that our Gulp task runs when we build the project:

<Target Name="RunGulp" BeforeTargets="Build">
<Exec Command="node_modules\.bin\gulp.cmd" />
</Target>

Now, when we build, the default Gulp task runs, which runs the build-vendor tasks, which then builds our vendor.min.css and vendor.min.js just like we did before. So after adjusting our _Layout.cshtml just like above, we can make use of jQuery and Bootstrap.

While the initial setup of Gulp is a bit more complicated than the bundleconfig.json one above, we have now have entered the Node-world and can start to make use of all the other cool tools there. So it might be worth to start with this.

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ASP.NET Core 2 Hosting - The Differences Between ASP.NET MVC and ASP.NET WebForms

clock July 27, 2018 07:28 by author Kenny

Terminology

Before we proceed to talk about the differences between WebForms and MVC, we need to know the difference between certain terms on the Microsoft stack of technologies. In the past, I've heard a couple of developers mixing and matching certain terms that weren't related to each other at all.

.NET Framework - A technology introduced in 2002 which includes the ability to create executables, web applications, and services using C# (pronounced see-sharp), Visual Basic, and F# (wikipedia)

ASP.NET - An open source, server-side web application framework which is a subset of the .NET Framework that focuses specifically on building web application, web sites, and web services.

ASP.NET Web Forms - (2002 - current) A proprietary technique developed by Microsoft to manage state and form data across multiple pages. The innate ability of the web are state-less pages where Microsoft created stateful pages by creating the Web Forms technique.

ASP.NET MVC - (2008 - current) An open source web application framework that implements a Model-View-Controller design pattern.
With that cleared up, let's go over the differences between ASP.NET Web Forms and MVC.

Differences Between ASP.NET Web Forms and ASP.NET MVC

Even though these technologies have been around for 5+ years, they each have their advantages and disadvantages.

Web Forms has ViewState, MVC does not

This has become the bane of my existence. As I mentioned above, ViewState is a page-level state management mechanism. If you have a number of server-side web controls on a page, your ViewState will become extremely large.

Let me tell you a story of how ViewState can be so...unnatural.

I worked at one company where I wasn't getting any data back from a submitted form. After talking to the security specialists and the networking team, I found out that my requests were being blocked by the company firewall.

The reason? The firewall was blocking the request because there was a form trying to perform a 2MB+ postback and the firewall thought it was blocking an attack from a hacker.

Another reason is that your HTML SHOULD be small to send back to the client, not bloated with a huge 1MB+ ViewState variable. Let's see that pass the mobile-friendly test. :-)

MVC does not have a ViewState. It uses model/ViewModels to pass back and forth between the Views.

Web Forms has a Code-Behind Model where MVC just has models

Code-Behind is a way to attach C# or VB code to a web page and act on their specific actions when they occur on the page. When you compile a Web Form that contains code-behind, it becomes part of the assembly (or DLL) to make the site functional.

With MVC, you pass in data that was already processed and is being delivered to the View which should have no logic or processing included in it as well.

Web Forms has Web Controls where MVC does not

There are a lot of developers who were complaining that MVC didn't have any server-side controls. This is because they became spoiled with the Web Forms way of doing things on a page. Controls were already available to them and they used them. Eventually, they started building their own custom server controls.

While Web Forms had a large number of server-controls, MVC kept the lean-and-mean approach to granular HTML. After the dust settled, developers started to understand the direction with MVC and leveraged JavaScript where they could build their own custom controls or even use a third-party library like Bootstrap for their UI.

Web Forms has State-aware components where MVC uses more of a template approach

This is why it's hard to convert a Web Forms application over to an MVC application.

In Web Forms, developers place controls on a web page and are able to manipulate those controls on the server in the code-behind. The server-side controls are even aware of their state when ViewState is turned on.

With MVC, you aren't working with controls, you are passing data to be used in a dumb View. The Razor syntax in a View is extremely powerful. If you want an objects property dropped into the HTML HEAD tag, you place a @model.Title right in the header and you're done.

Where Web Forms doesn't have the separation of concerns, MVC is adamant about it!

I can't tell you how many times I've seen developers create a Web Form, attach code to a control, and then place the business logic inside the code-behind instead of being handled or processed by a business object. How is that business logic going to be used in another application when it's attached to a UI control?

MVC's philosophy with business logic is "Thin Controllers, Fat Models" (Hence, my article about the skinniest controller) meaning that the models will contain all of your business logic while your controllers should return a model to the view.

This forces you to think about how your models should already have "processed data" and how the ViewModel will strictly be a car to transport your processed models to your destination which is the View.

Web Forms and MVC can use Sessions, but I would recommend against it

Along with ViewState, sessions are another bane of my existence. Sessions provide state in a state-less web. What happens when that state is out of sync? Don't tell me it won't be because it will. Been there, done that!

Developers placing state (or worse, user controls) inside of a session is just asking for trouble.

In MVC, there are a number of ways of passing data back and forth to the View. I mention a couple in a post called ASP.NET MVC Views: How to Pass Data To Views.

As I mentioned before, I'm glad I'm not the only one who feels this way about Sessions.

Web Forms has IsPostBack where MVC has a GET and...well...a POST

New Web Form developers (and some seasoned) sometimes forget to include an "if (IsPostBack) return;" statement in their Page_Load event of their page. This may look strange to some veteran web developers coming over from PHP or other web language.

The whole idea of Web Forms is when you are requesting a page, it's considered a GET (visiting the page for the first time) and the page initializes.

The term IsPostback is coined when a form is submitted, or POST-ed. So if I visit a page, the IsPostBack lets me through and performs the initialization of the page. When you submit a form, the Page_Load detects that it's a Postback and kicks you out of the Page_Load immediately because it should defer to the event that triggered the submit.

MVC has the standard HTTP Protocol standards of GET, POST, DELETE, and redirects. When you click a submit button, that form (and data) gets submitted to the controller and the controller handles the processing of it.

Again, the MVC way feels more natural.

Web Forms is not testable-friendly, MVC was built around tests

Out of the box, web form developers have a problem.

Unless they were disciplined with their business objects and code-behind forms, it may take a rewrite to get most of the business logic into a testable state.

With MVC, you can build tests against the controller, routes, action results...against just about any hooks in the ASP.NET MVC Framework.
Web Forms has One. Big. Form. MVC can have multiple forms on a page.

Speaking of unnatural, you can imagine how hard it is to go to a website that has a JavaScript service that contains an HTML form and they suggest you copy-and-paste this sample code into your ASP.NET Web Forms page.

Won't work. Why?

If you do a View Source on a Web Forms web site, you'll notice that right after the BODY tag in your HTML, there is a Form tag that encompasses the entire page...INSIDE A FORM!

This is where the gears in my head locked up the first time I experienced this. How kooky is this?

MVC allows you to have multiple forms on a page.

End of story.

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ASP.NET Core 2 Hosting - Creating A GraphQL Endpoint in ASP.NET Core

clock July 24, 2018 08:25 by author Kenny

The Graph Query Language

The GraphQL was invented by Facebook in 2012 and released to the public in 2015. It is a query language to tell the API exactly about the data you wanna have. This is the difference between REST, where you need to query different resources/URIs to get different data. In GrapgQL there is one single point of access about the data you want to retrieve.

That also makes the planning about the API a little more complex. You need to think about what data you wanna provide and you need to think about how you wanna provide that data.

While playing around with it, I created a small book database. The idea is to provide data about books and authors.

Let's have a look into few examples. The query to get the book number and the name of a specific book looks like this.

{
book(isbn: "822-5-315140-65-3"){
isbn,
name
}
}

This look similar to JSON but it isn't. The property names are not set in quotes, which means it is not really a JavaScript Object Notation. This query need to be sent inside the body of an POST request to the server.

The Query gets parsed and executed against a data source on the server and the server should send the result back to the client:

{
"data": {
"book": {
"isbn": "822-5-315140-65-3",
"name": "ultrices enim mauris parturient a"
}
}
}

If we want to know something about the author, we need to ask about it:

{
book(isbn: "822-5-315140-65-3"){
isbn,
name,
author{
id,
name,
birthdate
}
}
}

This is the possible result:

{
"data": {
"book": {
"isbn": "822-5-315140-65-3",
"name": "ultrices enim mauris parturient a",
"author": {
"id": 71,
"name": "Henderson",
"birthdate": "1937-03-20T06:58:44Z"
}
}
}
}

You need a list of books, including the authors? Just ask for it:

{
books{
isbn,
name,
author{
id,
name,
birthdate
}
}
}

The list is too large? Just limit the result, to get only 20 items:

{
books(limit: 20) {
isbn,
name,
author{
id,
name,
birthdate
}
}
}

The Book Database

The book database is just fake. I love to use GenFu to generate dummy data. So I did the same for the books and the authors and created a BookRepository:

public class BookRepository : IBookRepository
{
private IEnumerable<Book> _books = new List<Book>();
private IEnumerable<Author> _authors = new List<Author>();
public BookRepository()
{
GenFu.GenFu.Configure<Author>()
.Fill(_ => _.Name).AsLastName()
.Fill(_=>_.Birthdate).AsPastDate();
_authors = A.ListOf<Author>(40);
GenFu.GenFu.Configure<Book>()
.Fill(p => p.Isbn).AsISBN()
.Fill(p => p.Name).AsLoremIpsumWords(5)
.Fill(p => p.Author).WithRandom(_authors);
_books = A.ListOf<Book>(100);
}
public IEnumerable<Author> AllAuthors()
{
return _authors;
}
public IEnumerable<Book> AllBooks()
{
return _books;
}
public Author AuthorById(int id)
{
return _authors.First(_ => _.Id == id);
}
public Book BookByIsbn(string isbn)
{
return _books.First(_ => _.Isbn == isbn);
}
}
public static class StringFillerExtensions
{
public static GenFuConfigurator<T> AsISBN<T>(
this GenFuStringConfigurator<T> configurator) where T : new()
{
var filler = new CustomFiller<string>(
configurator.PropertyInfo.Name, 
typeof(T), 
() =>
{
return MakeIsbn();
});
configurator.Maggie.RegisterFiller(filler);
return configurator;
}

public static string MakeIsbn()
{
// 978-1-933988-27-6
var a = A.Random.Next(100, 999);
var b = A.Random.Next(1, 9);
var c = A.Random.Next(100000, 999999);
var d = A.Random.Next(10, 99);
var e = A.Random.Next(1, 9);
return $"{a}-{b}-{c}-{d}-{e}";
}
}

GenFu provides a useful set of so called fillers to generate data randomly. There are fillers to generate URLs, emails, names, last names, states of US and Canada and so on. I also need a ISBN generator, so I created one by extending the generic GenFuStringConfigurator.

The BookRepository is registered as a singleton in the Dependency Injection container, to work with the same set of data while the application is running. You are able to add some more information to that repository, like publishers and so on.

GraphQL in ASP.NET Core

Fortunately there is a .NET Standard compatible implementation of the GraphQL on GitHub. So there's no need to parse the Queries by yourself. This library is also available as a NuGet package:

<PackageReference Include="GraphQL" Version="0.15.1.678" />

The examples provided on GitHub, are pretty easy. They directly write the result to the output, which means the entire ASP.NET Applications is a GraphQL server. But I want to add GraphQL as a ASP.NET Core MiddleWare, to add the GraphQL implementation as a different part of the Application. Like this you are able to use REST based POST and PUT request to add or update the data and to use the GraphQL to query the data.

I also want that the middleware is listening to the sub path "/graph"

public class GraphQlMiddleware
{
private readonly RequestDelegate _next;
private readonly IBookRepository _bookRepository;
public GraphQlMiddleware(RequestDelegate next, IBookRepository bookRepository)
{
_next = next;
_bookRepository = bookRepository;
}
public async Task Invoke(HttpContext httpContext)
{
var sent = false;
if (httpContext.Request.Path.StartsWithSegments("/graph"))
{
using (var sr = new StreamReader(httpContext.Request.Body))
{
var query = await sr.ReadToEndAsync();
if (!String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(query))
{
var schema = new Schema { Query = new BooksQuery(_bookRepository) };
var result = await new DocumentExecuter()
.ExecuteAsync(options =>
{
options.Schema = schema;
options.Query = query;
}).ConfigureAwait(false);
CheckForErrors(result);
await WriteResult(httpContext, result);
sent = true;
}
}
}
if (!sent)
{
await _next(httpContext);
}
}
private async Task WriteResult(HttpContext httpContext, ExecutionResult result)
{
var json = new DocumentWriter(indent: true).Write(result);
httpContext.Response.StatusCode = 200;
httpContext.Response.ContentType = "application/json";
await httpContext.Response.WriteAsync(json);
}
private void CheckForErrors(ExecutionResult result)
{
if (result.Errors?.Count > 0)
{
var errors = new List<Exception>();
foreach (var error in result.Errors)
{
var ex = new Exception(error.Message);
if (error.InnerException != null)
{
ex = new Exception(error.Message, error.InnerException);
}
errors.Add(ex);
}
throw new AggregateException(errors);
}
}
}
public static class GraphQlMiddlewareExtensions
{
public static IApplicationBuilder UseGraphQL(this IApplicationBuilder builder)
{
return builder.UseMiddleware<GraphQlMiddleware>();
}
}

With this kind of MiddleWare, I can extend my applications Startup.cs with GraphQL:

app.UseGraphQL();

As you can see, the BookRepository gets passed into this Middleware via constructor injection. The most important part is that line:

var schema = new Schema { Query = new BooksQuery(_bookRepository) };

This is where we create a schema, which is used by the GraphQL engine to provide the data. The schema defines the structure of the data you wanna provide. This is all done in a root type called BooksQuery. This type gets the BookRepostory.

This Query is a GryphType, provided by the GraphQL library. You need to derive from a ObjectGraphType and to configure the schema in the constructor:

public class BooksQuery : ObjectGraphType
{
public BooksQuery(IBookRepository bookRepository)
{
Field<BookType>("book",
arguments: new QueryArguments(
new QueryArgument<StringGraphType>() { Name = "isbn" }),
resolve: context =>
{
var id = context.GetArgument<string>("isbn");
return bookRepository.BookByIsbn(id);
});
Field<ListGraphType<BookType>>("books",
resolve: context =>
{
return bookRepository.AllBooks();
});
}
}

Using the GraphQL library all types used in the Query to define the schema are any kind of GraphTypes, even the BookType:

public class BookType : ObjectGraphType<Book>
{
public BookType()
{
Field(x => x.Isbn).Description("The isbn of the book.");
Field(x => x.Name).Description("The name of the book.");
Field<AuthorType>("author");
}
}

The difference is just the generic ObjectGraphType which is also used for the AuthorType. The properties of the Book, which are simple types like the name or the ISBN are mapped directly with the lambda. The complex typed properties like the Author are mapped via another generic ObjectGraphType, which is ObjectGraphType in that case.

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ASP.NET Core 2 Hosting - Prepare Your Machine and Get to Know Visual Studio Code for Angular 2 and ASP.NET Core Project

clock July 10, 2018 11:44 by author Kenny

Why so many posts? The idea is to take you from nothing and not only build the application but to detail why it's built in this manner. There are numerous options when it comes to web development and for many readers this tutorial will walk you through two new frameworks and a new code editor so breaking up the content allows for sufficient explanation. In this particular post, you install the tools used throughout the remaining posts. The post also provides a tour of the main Visual Studio Code features used to create the application.

Prepare Your Machine

These are the frameworks and tools to install before writing any code: Node.js and npm; .NET Core (Includes ASP.NET Core); Visual Studio Code; C# Visual Studio Code Extension (Installed from Visual Studio Code)

Node.js and npm

No you aren't writing a Node.js application. However, the framework has become the defacto tooling standard for pre-processing your HTML, JavaScript, and CSS before it hits the browser. For instance, the Angular 2 application is built in TypeScript which requires compilation into JavaScript. Node.js fills this role in the application. As important as Node.js is its package manager, npm. This tool has also become the defacto standard for obtaining web development libraries and tooling. Node.js and npm are included in the same installer available in both a current and LTS (long-term support) version. The LTS version is recommended for most users. Make sure to have node version 4.x.x or higher and npm version 3.x.x or higher. You will check them later while touring Visual Studio Code.

.NET Core

To be clear, this is not the .NET Framework of old. The .NET Core framework is built from the ground up to be cross-platform and fast. This download includes the .NET Core and ASP.NET Core Frameworks as well as the terminal/command line tools used to create the backend in this tutorial. While higher-order features such as Routing, Views, Controllers are similar to their ASP.NET 4.6 counterparts, setting up and configuring an ASP.NET Core application is noticeably different and you will even start it from the terminal/command line. For this tutorial, use the .NET Core Preview 3 SDK. Later in this post, you will check which version is installed. It should be 1.0.0-preview3-x or higher.

Visual Studio Code

Visual Studio Code is one of the newer additions to the Visual Studio family. Forget anything you knew about traditional Visual Studio, this is a different animal entirely. During installation, you can add Visual Studio Code to your PATH variable. This enables the ability to type code . in the terminal/command window and open the current directory in Visual Studio Code.

Get to Know Visual Studio Code

This application is built entirely in Visual Studio Code. While this is not an exhaustive tour, it points out the main features of the editor relevant to building the application and continues setting up the editor for your project.

Explorer Pane

Put simply, this is where your files are listed. You point Visual Studio Code to a directory and this pane lists all the files and folders in that directory, including those that are currently open in the editor. You can create new files or folders directly in the explorer pane and to edit a file, simply click on it and it opens in the editor.

Integrated Terminal

The integreated terminal in Visual Studio Code is exactly that. Instead of switching between your editor and a seperate instance of your terminal/command window, you run commands directly in the editor. This walkthrough exclusively uses the integrated terminal, but of course using a separate terminal/command window works fine as well. Go head and try it out:

Press Ctrl + ` to open the Integrated Terminal
Type node -v then Enter to get the Node.js version. It should be 4.x.xor higher.
Type npm -v then Enter to get the npm version. It should be 3.x.x or higher.
Type dotnet --version then Enter to get the .NET Core SDK verion. It should be 1.0.0-preview3-x or higher.
Press Ctrl + ` to close the Integrated Terminal

If at any point these commands fail, it most likely means that either the framework is not installed or isn't added to your PATH. On windows at least, try restarting to refresh your PATH variable.

Command Palette

If you only remember one keyboard shortcut in Visual Studio Code, it should be Ctrl + Shift + P to open the command palette. The command palette contains almost every operation you want to complete in Visual Studio Code. Just start typing and it filters the list of operations for you. You're fingers never have to leave the keyboard. You still need to install the C# extension (from Microsoft) in Visual Studio Code before you start coding. Try to install it using the command palette. If you get stuck, you can also find it here. These are the key features in Visual Studio Code used during the walkthrough. There are so many other great features, so please read more about them in the Visual Studio Code documentation.

Best ASP.NET Hosting Recommendation

ASPHostPortal.com provides its customers with Plesk Panel, one of the most popular and stable control panels for Windows hosting, as free. You could also see the latest .NET framework, a crazy amount of functionality as well as Large disk space, bandwidth, MSSQL databases and more. All those give people the convenience to build up a powerful site in Windows server. ASPHostPortal.com offers ASP.NET hosting starts from $1/month only. They also guarantees 30 days money back and guarantee 99.9% uptime. If you need a reliable affordable ASP.NET Hosting, ASPHostPortal.com should be your best choice.



ASP.NET 5 Hosting - ASPHostPortal :: SEO For ASP.NET Web Sites

clock December 16, 2015 00:36 by author Kenny

SEO For ASP.NET Web Sites

One of the main sources of audience for these internet applications are the Search Engines like Google, Bing, Yahoo etc. Hence, the end application should not only handle your business problems efficiently but also follow some simple rules so that it yields good results in internet arena. This article, will list some of the simple guidelines which you need to consider if your Asp.Net application is an internet site.

1.    Add descriptive and unique Page Title for every page

Every page in your website should have a unique and descriptive page title that can describe what the page offers. You can set the Page Title either declaratively or in the code behind file. Refer below,

In ASPX,

<%@ Page Language="C#" AutoEventWireup="true" Title="My Home Page"  CodeFile="Default.aspx.cs" Inherits="_Default" %>

In code behind,

Page.Title = "My Home Page";

2.    Links should be hyperlinks, no linkbutton or javascript navigation for crawlable links

Make sure all your links in your page are hyperlinks. Search engines can crawl a page only if it is linked through a hyper link (anchor tag). Javascript navigations are not search engine friendly since search engines will not understand it.

3.    Use javascript navigation for site related pages that have no search values

Page rank is distributed across the links on your page. Some of the internal website pages like About us, disclaimer, Registration, login, contact us, user profile pages can be navigated through javascript so that the page rank are not distributed to them. Doing like this will make rest of the crawlable content links benefited.

4.    Add Meta Keyword and Description tag for every page

Add Meta keyword and Meta description tag with relevant contents. Search engines will use these tags to understand what the page offers. You can dynamically set the meta tags from codebehind file using the below code,

HtmlHead head = (HtmlHead)Page.Header;

 HtmlMeta metasearch1 = new HtmlMeta();

 HtmlMeta metasearch2 = new HtmlMeta();  

 metasearch1.Name = "descriptions";

 metasearch1.Content = "my personal site";

 head.Controls.Add(metasearch1);

 metasearch2.Name = "keywords";

 metasearch2.Content = "ASP.Net,C#,SQL";

 head.Controls.Add(metasearch2);

The above code will add the below Meta tags to output html.

<meta name="descriptions" content="my personal site" />

<meta name="keywords" content="ASP.Net,C#,SQL" />

In ASP.Net 4.0, Microsoft added 2 new properties on the Page directive (Page object) that lets you to define the Meta keywords and Description declaratively and dynamically from codebehind.

In ASPX,

<%@ Page Language="C#" AutoEventWireup="true" MetaKeywords="asp.net,C#" MetaDescription="This is an asp.net site that hosts asp.net tutorials" CodeFile="Default.aspx.cs" Inherits="_Default" %>

In codebehind,

protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)

    {

        Page.MetaKeywords = "asp.net,C#";

        Page.MetaDescription = "This is an asp.net site that hosts asp.net tutorials.";

    }

The similar can thing can be achieved in previous versions of .Net Framework by using a custom BasePage class.

5.    Make descriptive urls

Make your website URL descriptive. URL’s that has lots of query string values, numeric ids are not descriptive. It will provide enough information what the page offers. For example, http://www.example.com/products.aspx?catid=C91E9918-BEC3-4DAA-A54B-0EC7E874245E is not descriptive as http://www.example.com/Windows-Hosting

Apart from other parameters, search engines will also consider the website url to match your page for a searched keyword.



ASP.NET Hosting - ASPHostPortal.com : How to Migrating From ASP.NET Web API 2 to MVC 6

clock October 13, 2015 08:54 by author Kenny

How to Migrating From ASP.NET Web API 2 to MVC 6

If you create a new MVC 6 project from the default starter template, it will contain the following code in the Startup class, under ConfigureServices method:

 // Uncomment the following line to add Web API servcies which makes it easier to port Web API 2 controllers.
 // You need to add Microsoft.AspNet.Mvc.WebApiCompatShim package to project.json
 // services.AddWebApiConventions();

This pretty much explains it all – the Compatibility Shim is included in an external package, Microsoft.AspNet.Mvc.WebApiCompatShim and by default is switched off for new MVC projects. Once added and enabled, you can also have a look at the UseMvc method, under Configure. This is where central Web API routes can be defined:

      app.UseMvc(routes =>
        {
            routes.MapRoute(
                name: "default",
                template: "{controller}/{action}/{id?}",
                defaults: new { controller = "Home", action = "Index" });
            // Uncomment the following line to add a route for porting Web API 2 controllers.
            // routes.MapWebApiRoute("DefaultApi", "api/{controller}/{id?}");
        });

Inheriting from ApiController

Since the base class for Web API controllers was not Controller but ApiController, the shim introduces a type of the same name into MVC 6.

While it is obviously not 100% identical to the ApiController from Web API, it contains the majority of public proeprties and methods that you might have gotten used to – the Request property, the User property or a bunch of IHttpActionResult helpers.

Returning HttpResponseMessage

The shim introduces the ability to work with HttpResponseMessage in MVC 6 projects. How is this achieved? First of all, the Microsoft.AspNet.WebApi.Client package is referenced, and that brings in the familiar types – HttpResponseMessage and HttpRequestMessage.

On top of that, an extra formatter is injected into your application – HttpResponseMessageOutputFormatter. This allows you to return HttpResponseMessage from your actions, just like you were used to doing in Web API projects!

How does it work under the hood? Remember, in Web API, returning an instance of HttpResponseMessage bypassed content negotiation and simply forwarded the instance all the way to the hosting layer, which was responsible to convert it to a response that was relevant for a given host.

In the case of MVC 6, the new formatter will grab your HttpResponseMessage and copy its headers and contents onto the Microsoft.AspNet.Http.HttpResponse which is the new abstraction for HTTP response in ASP.NET 5.

As a result such type of an action as the one shown below, is possible in MVC 6, and as a consequence it should be much simpler to migrate your Web API 2 projects.

public HttpResponseMessage Post()
{
    return new HttpResponseMessage(HttpSattusCode.NoContent);
}

Binding HttpRequestMessage

In Web API it was possible to bind HttpRequestMessage in your actions. For example this was easily doable:

    [Route("test/{id:int}")]
    public string Get(int id, HttpRequestMessage req)
    {
        return id + " " + req.RequestUri;
    }
    [Route("testA")]
    public async Task<TestItem> Post(HttpRequestMessage req)
    {
        return await req.Content.ReadAsAsync<TestItem>();
    }

The shim introduces an HttpRequestMessageModelBinder which allows the same thing to be done under MVC 6. As a result, if you relied on HttpRequestMessage binding in Web API, your code will migrate to MVC 6 fine.

How does it work? The shim will use an intermediary type, HttpRequestMessageFeature, to create an instance of HttpRequestMessage from the ASP.NET 5 HttpContext.

HttpRequestMessage extensions

Since it was very common in the Web API world to use HttpResponseMessage as an action return type, there was a need for a mechanism that allowed easy creation of its instances. This was typically achieved by using the extension methods on the HttpRequestMessage, as they would perform content negotiation for you.

HttpError

If you use/used the CreateErrorResponse method mentioned above, you will end up relying on the HttpError class which is another ghost of the Web API past rejuvenated by the compatibility shim.

HttpError was traditionally used by Web API to serve up error information to the client in a (kind of) standardized way. It contained properties such as ModelState, MessageDetail or StackTrace.

It was used by not just the CreateErrorResponse extension method but also by a bunch of IHttpActionResults – InvalidModelStateResult, ExceptionResult and BadRequestErrorMessageResult. As a result, HttpError is back to facilitate all of these types.

Best ASP.NET 4.6 Hosting Recommendation

ASPHostPortal.com provides its customers with Plesk Panel, one of the most popular and stable control panels for Windows hosting, as free. You could also see the latest .NET framework, a crazy amount of functionality as well as Large disk space, bandwidth, MSSQL databases and more. All those give people the convenience to build up a powerful site in Windows server. ASPHostPortal.com offers ASP.NET hosting starts from $1/month only. They also guarantees 30 days money back and guarantee 99.9% uptime. If you need a reliable affordable ASP.NET Hosting, ASPHostPortal.com should be your best choice.



ASP.NET Hosting - ASPHostPortal.com :: How to Check Duplicate User Names In ASP.NET Web Pages Sites

clock October 5, 2015 11:39 by author Kenny

How to Check Duplicate User Names In ASP.NET Web Pages Sites

The Web Pages Starter Site template provides a useful starting point for developing a Razor Web Pages site that includes membership. But it doesn't include any mechanism for preventing duplicate user names. This article offers one solution to the problem that uses jQuery.

If you ask how to prevent duplicate user names in forums, one of the suggestions that is often put forward is to apply a unique constraint in the database column that holds the user name. Any attempt to submit a duplicate value will result in an exception being raised in the relevant database provider. You can catch this exception and show the user an appropriate message. This works but it's a fairly clunky solution. And many people feel that you should not use exceptions as a means to manage your business rules.

The solution featured in this article uses AJAX to query the database and to give the user immediate feedback when they enter their chosen user name. The AJAX call requests a page that exists purely to query the database to see if the selected user name is already in use. The solution also includes a server side chekc to ensure that users who have disabled JavaScript so not slip through the net. The solution requires a couple of amendments to the Register.cshtml file in the Starter Site, and the addition of 3 files. But first, the changes to the Register.cshtml page. The first change is in the inclusion of a JavaScript file called dupecheck.js.

@* Remove this section if you are using bundling *@
@section Scripts {
    <script src="~/Scripts/jquery.validate.min.js"></script>
    <script src="~/Scripts/jquery.validate.unobtrusive.min.js"></script>
    <script src="~/Scripts/dupecheck.js"></script>
}

And the second is the server side check to see if the username is in use:

if(Functions.IsDuplicate(email)){
    ModelState.AddError("email", "User name is already taken");
}

I placed this in the if(IsPost) section just after the initial variables that represent the submitted values (email, password and confirmPassword) are declared. The code calls a function named IsDuplicate. The function is declared in a file called Functions.cshtml which is placed in a folder called App_Code:

@functions {
    public static bool IsDuplicate(string username){
        var db = Database.Open("StarterSite");
        var commandText = @"SELECT COUNT(Email) FROM UserProfile WHERE Email = @0";
        return (int)db.QueryValue(commandText, username) > 0;
    }
}

Note that the name of the folder is important. The function returns a bool. The value of the bool is determined as a result if the SQL query which gets a count of the rows containing the provided user name. By default, the Starter Site uses a column called Email in the UserProfile table for the storage of user names. This function is also called in a separate file named DupeCheck.cshtml. This file is placed in the root of the site:

@{
    Layout = null;
    if(IsAjax){
        var username = Request["username"];
        var result = Functions.IsDuplicate(username);
        Json.Write(new { isDupe = result }, Response.Output);
    }
}

DupeCheck.cshtml is designed to work exclusively with AJAX. The code includes an instruction to nullify any layout pages that might have been set in a _PageStart file, and then it uses the IsAjax property to determine if the page has been requested via an AJAX call. If it has, it uses the IsDuplicate method to check the availability of the posted username and returns the result to the calling code. The result is an anonymous type that has one propery: isDupe, which is a boolean. The anonymous type is serialised to JSON by the Json helper.

The final part of the solution is the dupecheck.js file. This uses jQuery:

$(function () {
    $('#email').change(function () {
        $.post(
            '/DupeCheck',
            { username: $(this).val() },
            function (data) {
                var emailValidation = $('span[data-valmsg-for="email"]');
                if (data.isDupe) {
                    if (emailValidation.hasClass('field-validation-valid')) {
                        emailValidation.removeClass('field-validation-valid');
                        emailValidation.addClass('field-validation-error');
                        emailValidation.text('That name is already taken!');
                    }
                } else {
                    if (emailValidation.hasClass('field-validation-error')) {
                        emailValidation.removeClass('field-validation-error');
                        emailValidation.addClass('field-validation-valid');
                        emailValidation.text('');
                    }
                }
            },'json'
        );
    });
});

An event handler is attached to the change event of the user name input (which has an id if email in the Starter Site). The current value is posted to the DupeCheck.cshtml page via AJAX. The code above checks the response from the server to see if the value is a duplicate, and if it is, an appropriate error message is displayed to the user.

Best ASP.NET 4.6 Hosting Recommendation

ASPHostPortal.com provides its customers with Plesk Panel, one of the most popular and stable control panels for Windows hosting, as free. You could also see the latest .NET framework, a crazy amount of functionality as well as Large disk space, bandwidth, MSSQL databases and more. All those give people the convenience to build up a powerful site in Windows server. ASPHostPortal.com offers ASP.NET hosting starts from $1/month only. They also guarantees 30 days money back and guarantee 99.9% uptime. If you need a reliable affordable ASP.NET Hosting, ASPHostPortal.com should be your best choice.



ASP.NET Hosting - ASPHostPortal.com :: Easy to Design Pie Chart and Donut Chart in ASP.NET

clock September 28, 2015 12:40 by author Kenny

Easy to Design Pie Chart and Donut Chart in ASP.NET

D3.js stands for Data-Driven Document. It is a JavaScript library using which we can manipulate documents based on data. The data can be fetched using multiple ways like Web Services, WCF Services, REST APIs or the relatively new Microsoft ASP.NET Web API amongst many others. Using D3, you can bind the data to the Document Object Model (DOM) and present that data with rich visualizations. D3 internally makes use of CSS, HTML and SVG capabilities to make your data presentable. It is powerful, fast and supports large datasets and dynamic behaviors for interactions and powerful and smooth animations.

D3.js provides easy and declarative selections of DOM nodes using W3C Selector APIs. D3 Selector APIs provides number of methods to manipulate nodes. For example –

  • Setting attributes and applying rich styles
  • Registering Event Listeners
  • You can add, remove and sort DOM nodes
  • You can change the HTML or the text contents of HTML elements
  • You can also have a direct selection/access to the DOM as each selection is an array of nodes

Likewise, we have various features of D3.js selectors which we can use to present data to our DOM nodes.

A simple selector example is the following:

var bodySelection = d3.select('body').style('background-color', 'blue');

In the above example, we are selecting body and changing its background color to blue. Another example would be as follows:

var divSelection = d3.selectAll('div').style('background-color', 'yellow');

In the above example, we are selecting all divs and changing its background color to yellow. If you are familiar with jQuery, the syntax looks similar to jQuery selectors or HTML5 Selectors.

D3 allows us to bind the data to the DOM elements and their attributes using a Data method which takes an array. For example:

d3.selectAll("div")
  .data([200,300,400,100])
  .style("height", function (data) { return data + "px"; });

In the above example, we are selecting all the div’s on the page and based on the index, the first value of an array will be passed to first div, second value to second div and so on.

In D3, you can also make use of Enter and Exit selector methods to create new nodes for incoming data, and remove outing nodes that are no longer used.

You can also apply transitions to nodes using D3. For example –

var area = d3.select('body')
            .append('svg')
            .attr('width', 500)
            .attr('height', 500);
 
var circle = area.append('rect')
                 .attr('width', 100)
                 .attr('height', 100)
                 .attr('fill', 'red');
 
circle.transition()
      .duration(2000)
      .delay(2000)
      .attr('width', 400)
      .each('start', function () {
            d3.select(this).attr('fill', 'green');})
      .transition()
      .duration(2000)
      .attr('height', 400)
      .transition()
      .duration(2000)
      .attr('width', 50)
      .transition()
      .duration(2000)
      .attr('height', 50)
      .each('end', function () {
            d3.select(this).attr('fill', 'blue'); });

In the above example, we are drawing a Rectangle and applying the transition to the same. Likewise, we can make use of various features of D3.js to present our data using rich visualizations.

A Quick overview of ASP.NET Web API

REST(REpresentational State Transfer) has emerged as the prominent way to create web services. By using REST we can build loose coupled services with data available on the web over HTTP protocol.

ASP.NET Web API is a platform for building RESTful applications. ASP.NET Web API is a framework using which we can build HTTP Services which can be called from a broad range of clients, browsers and mobile devices. ASP.NET Web API is the defacto standard of creating web services and replaces WCF.

When we think about exposing data on the web, we usually talk about four common operations which we use on a daily basis in our apps – CREATE, RETRIVE, UPDATE, DELETE.

We call these operations as CRUD operations. REST provides 4 basic HTTP verbs which we can map to our CRUD operations as described here - POST – CREATE, GET – RETRIVE, PUT – UPDATE, DELETE – DELETE.

By using REST, if you can connect to the web, any application can consume your data. When the data is pulled or pushed by using REST, the data is always serialized into or de-serialized from JSON or XML.

Setting up the application and ASP.NET Web API

To start designing the Pie chart and Donut chart, use the following tools and technologies:

  • Microsoft Visual Studio 2013 (Express or Professional)
  • Microsoft SQL Server 2012 (Express or Developer)
  • jQuery
  • D3.js
  • ASP.NET WEB API

Let’s first design the table where we can add our data. To design the table, open SQL Server Management Studio and write the following script:

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[CityPopulationTable](
    [CityID] [int] IDENTITY PRIMARY KEY,
    [CityName] [nvarchar](30) NULL,
    [Population] [int] NULL
)

Create an ASP.NET Web application by choosing Web Forms template. Then add the Entity Framework, jQuery and D3.js libraries into our web application using NuGet.

Once you add these libraries, right click on the Models folder in our Web application under Solution Explorer, and click on Add New Item. Choose Data  > ADO.NET Entity Data Model.

Using Entity Data Model Wizard, connect to our database and choose CityPopulationTable.

It’s time to implement the ASP.NET Web API into our project. Right click the web application and add a new folder with the name Controllers.

After adding the Web API, open Global.asax file and import two namespaces as shown here:

using System.Web.Http;
using System.Web.Routing;

Also add the following code to the Application_Start method –

GlobalConfiguration.Configure(WebApiConfig.Register);

The above line registers the Web API route in our web application. Now under App_Start folder, you will find WebApiConfig.cs file. Open this file and write the following code:

public static void Register(HttpConfiguration config)
{
    config.MapHttpAttributeRoutes();
 
    config.Routes.MapHttpRoute(
        name: "DefaultApi",
        routeTemplate: "api/{controller}/{id}",
        defaults: new { id = RouteParameter.Optional }
    );
    var json = config.Formatters.JsonFormatter;
    json.SerializerSettings.PreserveReferencesHandling = Newtonsoft.Json.PreserveReferencesHandling.Objects;
    json.SerializerSettings.ContractResolver = new CamelCasePropertyNamesContractResolver();
    config.Formatters.Remove(config.Formatters.XmlFormatter);
}

In the above code, we are configuring Web API to make use of JSON formatter with camel casing, as most of the JavaScript developer will expect JSON output in Camel casing.

Now modify the Get method of our Web API controller as shown here:

public class PieChartController : ApiController
{
    NorthwindEntities dataContext = new NorthwindEntities();
    // GET api/piechart
    public IEnumerable<CityPopulationTable> Get()
    {
        return dataContext.CityPopulationTables.ToList();
    }
}

In the above code, we have created an object of our Entity Data model which will give access to the tables. Then we are returning an IEnumerable of our object CityPopulationTables.

Let us design our Pie chart and Donut chart using the Web API data shown in above:

Creating D3 Charts

Add a HTML page with the name ‘CityPolulationPieChart.html’. Once you add the page, we will reference the jQuery and D3.js file in the page:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
<head>
    <title>Pie Chart Example</title>
    <script src="Scripts/jquery-1.10.2.js"></script>
    <script src="Scripts/d3.js"></script>
</head>

We will make use of jQuery AJAX function to fetch the data from our Web API and display it in a Pie and Donut chart. Let’s add a DOM ready function into our <body> tag. In this function, we will first declare two arrays. First array will hold the data for our chart and the second array will hold the colors which we will use for our chart:

$(function () {
            var chartData = [];
            var colors = [];
});

In the next step, we will fetch the data from our Web API using jQuery $.ajax function. Add this code after our array declaration:

$.ajax({
        type: "GET",
        url: "api/PieChart",
        contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8",
        dataType: "json",
        success: function (result) {
            $.each(result, function (i,j) {
                chartData.push(j.population);
                var currentColor = '#' + Math.floor(Math.random() * j.population+5566656).toString(16);
                colors.push(currentColor);
            });
            console.log(chartData);}
        error: function (msg) {
            $("#result").text(msg);
        }
});

Note: Although I have used success and error here for devs using an older version of jQuery, these methods have been deprecated from jQuery 1.8. You should replace them with .done() and fail().

In the above code, we are using a GET request with the Web API URL and the type of data set to JSON. On successful completion of the request, we are running a loop using $.each() which will push the fetched data into our chartData array. We are also generating colors and adding them into our colors array.

Now it’s time to use the D3 selector. We will use D3 selector to select the body and will append the SVG element to the same by setting its height and width. Add this code after console.log function. The code is shown below –

var radius = 300;
var colorScale = d3.scale.ordinal().range(colors);
                    
var area = d3.select('body').append('svg')
             .attr('width', 1500)
             .attr('height', 1500);

Also note that we are using the scale function of D3 which allows us to set the ordinal scale with the range to set the scale’s output range. We have also added a variable called radius which is set to 300.

The next step is to group the elements and draw an arc into our SVG as shown in the following code:

var pieGroup = area.append('g').attr('transform', 'translate(300, 300)');
var arc = d3.svg.arc()
                .innerRadius(0)
                .outerRadius(radius);

In the above code, we are using radius variable as the outer radius and fixing the inner radius to 0. As the next step, use a pie layout available under D3. Then pass the chart data and append it to our group ‘g’. The code is shown below –

var pie = d3.layout.pie()
       .value(function (data) { return data; })
var arcs = pieGroup.selectAll('.arc')
       .data(pie(chartData))
       .enter()
       .append('g')
       .attr('class', 'arc');

Also observe, we are using D3 selector to select arc class added at the end, which will select all the elements which has a class arc. In the last step,  append the path and fill the color from our array. We will also display the population data as text to our pie chart. The code is shown below –

arcs.append('path')
    .attr('d', arc)
    .attr('fill', function (d) { return colorScale(d.data); });
 
arcs.append('text')
    .attr('transform', function (data) { return 'translate(' + arc.centroid(data) + ')'; })
    .attr('text-anchor', 'middle')
    .attr('font-size', '1em')
    .text(function (data) { return data.data; });

Donut Chart

Designing a Donut chart is very simple. Just change the inner radius to something higher than zero. I am making it 200. The code is as shown here:

var arc = d3.svg.arc()
        .innerRadius(200)
        .outerRadius(radius);

Best ASP.NET 4.6 Hosting Recommendation

ASPHostPortal.com provides its customers with Plesk Panel, one of the most popular and stable control panels for Windows hosting, as free. You could also see the latest .NET framework, a crazy amount of functionality as well as Large disk space, bandwidth, MSSQL databases and more. All those give people the convenience to build up a powerful site in Windows server. ASPHostPortal.com offers ASP.NET hosting starts from $1/month only. They also guarantees 30 days money back and guarantee 99.9% uptime. If you need a reliable affordable ASP.NET Hosting, ASPHostPortal.com should be your best choice.



ASP.NET MVC 6 Hosting - ASPHostPortal :: Remote Validation in ASP.NET MVC

clock August 24, 2015 08:07 by author Kenny

Remote Validation in ASP.NET MVC

ASP.NET is an open-source server-side Web application framework designed for Web development to produce dynamic Web pages. It was developed by Microsoft to allow programmers to build dynamic web sites, web applications and web services. ASP.NET MVC gives you a powerful, patterns-based way to build dynamic websites that enables a clean separation of concerns and that gives you full control over markup. Remote validation is used to make server calls to validate data without posting the entire form to the server when server side validation is preferable to client side.  It's all done set up model and controller which is pretty neat. 

Using the Code

To implement remote validation in an application we have two scenarios, one is without an additional parameter and the other is with an additional parameter. First we create an example without an additional parameter. In this example we check whether a username exists or not. If the username exists then that means the input user name is not valid. We create a view model class "UserViewModel" under the Models folder and that code is:

using System.Web.Mvc;  
namespace RemoteValidation.Models   
{  
    public class UserViewModel   
    {  
        public string UserName   
        {  
            get;  
            set;  
        }  
        public string Email   
        {  
            get;  
            set;  
        }  
    }  
}

 

Now we create a static data source, in other words we create a static list of UserViewModel in which we could check whether a username exists or not. You can also use the database rather than a static list. The following code snippet is for StaticData.

using RemoteValidation.Models;  
using System.Collections.Generic;  
 
namespace RemoteValidation.Code   
{  
    public static class StaticData   
    {  
        public static List < UserViewModel > UserList   
        {  
            get {  
                return new List < UserViewModel >   
                {  
                    new UserViewModel   
                    {  
                        UserName = "User1", Email = "[email protected]"  
                    },  
                    new UserViewModel   
                    {  
                        UserName = "User2", Email = "[email protected]"  
                    }  
                }  
            }  
        }  
    }  

 

Now we create a controller "ValidationController" in which we create an action method to check whether a user name exists or not and return a result as a JSON format. If the username exists then it returns false so that the validation is implemented on the input field. The following code snippet shows ValidationController under the Controllers folder.

using RemoteValidation.Code;  
using System.Linq;  
using System.Web.Mvc;  
 
namespace RemoteValidation.Controllers   
{  
    public class ValidationController: Controller   
    {  
        [HttpGet]  
        public JsonResult IsUserNameExist(string userName)   
        {  
            bool isExist = StaticData.UserList.Where(u = > u.UserName.ToLowerInvariant().Equals(userName.ToLower())).FirstOrDefault() != null;  
            return Json(!isExist, JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);  
        }  
    }  
}

 

Now we add remote validation on the UserName of the UserViewModel property as in the following code snippet.

using System.Web.Mvc;  
 
namespace RemoteValidation.Models   
{  
    public class UserViewModel   
    {  
        [Remote("IsUserNameExist", "Validation", ErrorMessage = "User name already exist")]  
        public string UserName   
        {  
            get;  
            set;  
        }  
        public string Email   
        {  
            get;  
            set;  
        }  
    }  

 

As in the preceding code snippet, the IsUserNameExist is a method of ValidationController that is called on the blur of an input field using a GET request. Now we create UserController under the Controllers folder to render a view on the UI.

using RemoteValidation.Models;  
using System.Web.Mvc;  
 
namespace RemoteValidation.Controllers   
{  
    public class UserController: Controller   
    {  
        [HttpGet]  
        public ActionResult AddUser()   
        {  
            UserViewModel model = new UserViewModel();  
            return View(model);  
        }  
    }  

Now we add jquery.validate.js and jquery.validate.unobtrusive.js to the project and create a bundle as in the following code snippet.

using System.Web.Optimization;  
 
namespace RemoteValidation.App_Start   
{  
    public class BundleConfig   
    {  
        public static void RegisterBundles(BundleCollection bundles)   
        {  
            bundles.Add(new StyleBundle("~/Content/css").Include(  
                "~/Content/css/bootstrap.css",  
                "~/Content/css/font-awesome.css",  
                "~/Content/css/site.css"));  
 
            bundles.Add(new ScriptBundle("~/bundles/jquery").Include(  
                "~/Scripts/jquery-{version}.js"));  
 
            bundles.Add(new ScriptBundle("~/bundles/jqueryval").Include(  
                "~/Scripts/jquery.validate*"));  
        }  
    }  

Thereafter we add the following keys in the web.config file.

<add key="ClientValidationEnabled" value="true" />   
<add key="UnobtrusiveJavaScriptEnabled" value="true" />  
 
 

Thereafter we create a view for the AddUser action method. The following code snippet is for the AddUser view.

@model RemoteValidation.Models.UserViewModel  
 
< div class = "panel panel-primary" > < div class = "panel-heading panel-head" > Add User < /div>    
    <div class="panel-body">    
        @using (Html.BeginForm())    
        {    
            <div class="form-horizontal">    
                <div class="form-group">    
                    @Html.LabelFor(model => model.UserName, new { @class = "col-lg-2 control-label" })    
                    <div class="col-lg-9">    
                        @Html.TextBoxFor(model => model.UserName, new { @class = "form-control" })    
                        @Html.ValidationMessageFor(model => model.UserName)    
                    </div > < /div>    
                <div class="form-group">    
                    @Html.LabelFor(model => model.Email, new { @class = "col-lg-2 control-label" })    
                    <div class="col-lg-9">    
                        @Html.TextBoxFor(model => model.Email, new { @class = "form-control" })    
                        @Html.ValidationMessageFor(model => model.Email)    
                    </div > < /div>                    
                <div class="form-group">    
                    <div class="col-lg-9"></div > < div class = "col-lg-3" > < button class = "btn btn-success"  
                     id = "btnSubmit"  
                     type = "submit" > Submit < /button>    
                    </div >
               < /div>    
            </div >  
} < /div>    
</div >   
@section scripts   
{  
    @Scripts.Render("~/bundles/jqueryval")  

Let's run the application and put values into the user name field to execute the remote validation as in the following image.

Figure 1: Remote validation on user name


Now we move to another option, we pass an additional parameter in the remote validation. We pass both the user name and email as a parameter and check whether the username and email combination exist or not on the email input. That's why we add one more method in ValidationController as in the following code snippet for it.

[HttpGet]  
public JsonResult IsUserExist(string email, string userName)   
{  
    bool isExist = StaticData.UserList.Where(u = > u.UserName.ToLowerInvariant().Equals(userName.ToLower()) && u.Email.ToLowerInvariant().Equals(email.ToLower())).FirstOrDefault() != null;  
    return Json(!isExist, JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);  

Now we call this method on the Email property of UserViewModel as in the following code snippet.

using System.Web.Mvc;  
 
namespace RemoteValidation.Models   
{  
    public class UserViewModel   
    {  
        [Remote("IsUserNameExist", "Validation", ErrorMessage = "User name already exist")]  
        public string UserName   
        {  
            get;  
            set;  
        }  
        [Remote("IsUserExist", "Validation", ErrorMessage = "User already exist", AdditionalFields = "UserName")]  
        public string Email   
        {  
            get;  
            set;  
        }  
    }  
}

As in the preceding code snippet, we are passing an additional field using AdditionalFields in Remote. If we must pass more than one parameter then these will be comma-separated. Now run the application and the result will be as shown in the following image.  



ASP.NET 4.5.2 Hosting - ASPHostPortal.com to Launch New Data Center in Paris

clock November 10, 2014 10:44 by author Kenny

ASPHostPortal.com to Launch New Data Center in Paris, France on November 2014

ASPHostPortal is known for credible and unswerving web hosting solutions. Apart from the reliability of the ASPHostPortal Uptime, which features 99.9 per cent average uptime, ASPHostPortal also offers outstanding data center which reflects ASPHostPortal high speed and high performance hosting package.  Recently, ASPHostPortal.com launch its new data center in Paris, France on 9th November 2014 with room for more than 10,000 physical servers, and allowing customers’ to meet their France data residency requirements.

The new facility will provide customers and their end users with ASPHostPortal.com services that meet in-country data residency requirements. It will also complement the existing ASPHostPortal.com Amsterdam data center and London data center, to provide European customers redundancy options within the region. The Paris data center will offer the full range of ASPHostPortal.com web hosting infrastructure services, including bare metal servers, virtual servers, storage and networking.

ASPHostPortal offers the perfect combination of affordability and reliability.  They have an excellent uptime history with several months this year boasting more than 99.9% average uptime.  Their hosting package reflects speed and performance.  Their data center can take much of the credit for such superb services. The new data center will allow customers to replicate or integrate data between Paris, London and Amsterdam data centers with high transfer speeds and unmetered bandwidth (at no charge) between facilities.

“With ASPHostPortal, choosing the data center location is a free feature and option to all customers. The customer simply chooses US, Europe, Asia or Australia. It's simple, intuitive and convenient. The option is free, and there will never be any other cost to the user associated with this option,” said Dean Thomas, Manager at ASPHostPortal.co

Clients who have any questions about the feature and the option that is most suitable for their purposes should feel free to contact ASPHostPortal through their 24/7/365 customer support team. ASPHostPortal will help you choose the right option that will best suit your needs.

For more information about new data center in France, please visit http://asphostportal.com/Hosting-Data-Center-France.

About ASPHostPortal.com:

ASPHostPortal.com is a hosting company that best support in Windows and ASP.NET-based hosting. Services include shared hosting, reseller hosting, and SharePoint hosting, with specialty in ASP.NET, SQL Server, and architecting highly scalable solutions. As a leading small to mid-sized business web hosting provider, ASPHostPortal.com strive to offer the most technologically advanced hosting solutions available to all customers across the world. Security, reliability, and performance are at the core of hosting operations to ensure each site and/or application hosted is highly secured and performs at optimum level.



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Success for us is something that is continually experienced, not something that is reached. For us it is all about the experience – more than the journey. Life is a continual experience. We see the Internet as being an incredible amplifier to the experience of life for all of us. It can help humanity come together to explode in knowledge exploration and discussion. It is continual enlightenment of new ideas, experiences, and passions


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