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Tutorial and Articles about ASP.NET and the latest ASP.NET Core

ASP.NET Core Hosting - Easy to Migrate Visual Basic 6 to .NET

clock August 21, 2018 09:56 by author Kenny

Converting VB6 code to VB.NET is not a simple process that can be executed easily in spite of using automation tools. A number of automation tools are available in the market, with Microsoft itself being shipped with Visual Basic Upgrade Wizard. Some of the major changes undergone in VB6 is in the Common Language Runtime (CLR) new programming model. To reap maximum benefit out of the new features and structures of VB.NET, it is advisable to rewrite major sections of the application than porting it. Since this is a tedious process you can use VB.NET’s Upgrade Wizard that automatically converts all the syntaxes, which is just half the work done. No sooner you will be faced with other problems and errors during compilation that won’t be handled properly with the Upgrade Wizard. During migration you will have to rewrite and rearchitect the codes to take maximum advantage of VB.NET’s new tools.

.NET migration is a complex process that requires strict adherence to the features and syntactical aspects of the programming language. Here we list some of the essential steps that need to be considered while migrating from VB6 to VB.NET.

1. Application Assessment – Perform a thorough assessment of the application to be upgraded. You can document the existing system functionalities, which may be a tedious process. Use an assessment tool to analyze the VB6 application to understand issues and estimate the approximate cost and effort.

2. Planning and Preparation – Prepare project plan, determine scope and migration requirements by elucidating maximum information about the application. Create functional requirements for the new framework and application.

3. Upgrade Strategies – Develop a migration strategy after brainstorming the application requirements. First you need to get the VB6 application into the new .NET platform with the existing functionality then perform incremental changes to incorporate new functions.

4. Automatic Upgrade Process – After automated migration the quality of the generated code needs to be improved. This involves removing duplicated code, upgrading problematic syntax and controls, fixing data declarations, and the like.

5. Manual Upgrade Process – It is essential to rewrite critical application logic to suit the .NET framework and those that have not been properly converted during automation. You can continue writing new code in VB.NET leaving the bulk of the existing code in VB6 as there is good interoperability between VB6 COM components and VB.NET components.

6. Migrate Data – This involves creating a SQL Server or database and importing data and resizing the database structure.

7. Compiling – Compiling the project gives a list of compilation errors and runtime errors that needs to be analyzed and fixed through an iterative process.

8. Fixing Errors – Bugs can be tracked using various source code analyzers that helps identify duplicate codes and fix data declarations.

9. Quality Assurance – Upgraded application will be subjected to different levels of testing throughout the process to ensure reliability and correctness of the application.

  • Unit test thoroughly each item converted to help identify any flaws in implementation.
  • Perform system testing to ensure the application functionalities are met in the .NET framework version.
  • Import final version legacy data and perform load testing to ensure the application works in the .NET environment.

10. Deployment – Finally deploy to application server and verify the checklist of all the components and functionalities in the application tally.

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ASP.NET Core 2 Hosting - Create ASP.NET Chart Control from Database using C#

clock August 10, 2018 11:11 by author Kenny

In this article I will explain with an example, how you can display charts in ASP.Net using new Chart Control.

Web.Config Modifications

You will need to modify the Web.Config file as following shown in order to use the ASP.Net 4.0 Chart control.

<configuration>
    <appSettings>
        <add key="ChartImageHandler" value="storage=file;timeout=20;" />
    </appSettings>
    <connectionStrings>
        <add name="conString"
        connectionString="Data Source=.\SQL2005;database=Northwind;Integrated Security=true"/>
    </connectionStrings>
 
    <system.web>
        <compilation debug="true" targetFramework="4.0">
            <assemblies>
                <add assembly="System.Web.DataVisualization, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31BF3856AD364E35"/>
            </assemblies>
        </compilation>
        <httpHandlers>
            <add path="ChartImg.axd" verb="GET,HEAD,POST" type="System.Web.UI.DataVisualization.Charting.ChartHttpHandler, System.Web.DataVisualization, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35" validate="false"/>
        </httpHandlers>
        <pages>
            <controls>
                <add tagPrefix="asp" namespace="System.Web.UI.DataVisualization.Charting" assembly="System.Web.DataVisualization, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35"/>
            </controls>
        </pages>
    </system.web>
    <system.webServer>
        <handlers>
            <remove name="ChartImageHandler"/>
            <add name="ChartImageHandler" preCondition="integratedMode" verb="GET,HEAD,POST" path="ChartImg.axd" type="System.Web.UI.DataVisualization.Charting.ChartHttpHandler, System.Web.DataVisualization, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35"/>
        </handlers>
    </system.webServer>
</configuration>

HTML Markup

Below is the HTML Markup of the page. It has an ASP.Net DropDownList and an ASP.Net Chart Control. The DropDownList is populated with countries and when a country is selected, the chart is populated with the statistics of orders of different cities in the selected country.

<asp:DropDownList ID="ddlCountries" runat="server" OnSelectedIndexChanged="ddlCountries_SelectedIndexChanged"
    AutoPostBack = "true">
</asp:DropDownList><hr />
<asp:Chart ID="Chart1" runat="server" Height="300px" Width="400px" Visible = "false">
    <Titles>
        <asp:Title ShadowOffset="3" Name="Items" />
    </Titles>
    <Legends>
        <asp:Legend Alignment="Center" Docking="Bottom" IsTextAutoFit="False" Name="Default" LegendStyle="Row" />
    </Legends>
    <Series>
        <asp:Series Name="Default" />
    </Series>
    <ChartAreas>
        <asp:ChartArea Name="ChartArea1" BorderWidth="0" />
    </ChartAreas>
</asp:Chart>

Namespaces

You will need to import the following Namespaces.

C#

using System.Data;
using System.Data.SqlClient;
using System.Configuration;

Populating the DropDownList and Chart

Inside the Page Load event, the DropDownList is populated with Countries from the Orders table of the Northwind database. When a Country is selected in the DropDownList, the statistical records of Ship Cities and their Total Orders are fetched from the Orders table. The Ship City values are assigned to the X point values of the Chart while the Total Orders value for the Ship Cities are assigned to the Y point values of the Chart. Finally using these values the Chart is populated and displayed.

C#

protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    if (!IsPostBack)
    {
        string query = "select distinct shipcountry from orders";
        DataTable dt = GetData(query);
        ddlCountries.DataSource = dt;
        ddlCountries.DataTextField = "shipcountry";
        ddlCountries.DataValueField = "shipcountry";
        ddlCountries.DataBind();
        ddlCountries.Items.Insert(0, new ListItem("Select", ""));
    }
}
  
protected void ddlCountries_SelectedIndexChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    Chart1.Visible = ddlCountries.SelectedValue != "";
    string query = string.Format("select shipcity, count(orderid) from orders where shipcountry = '{0}' group by shipcity", ddlCountries.SelectedValue);
    DataTable dt = GetData(query);
    string[] x = new string[dt.Rows.Count];
    int[] y = new int[dt.Rows.Count];
    for (int i = 0; i < dt.Rows.Count; i++)
    {
        x[i] = dt.Rows[i][0].ToString();
        y[i] = Convert.ToInt32(dt.Rows[i][1]);
    }
    Chart1.Series[0].Points.DataBindXY(x, y);
    Chart1.Series[0].ChartType = SeriesChartType.Pie;
    Chart1.ChartAreas["ChartArea1"].Area3DStyle.Enable3D = true;
    Chart1.Legends[0].Enabled = true;
}
 
private static DataTable GetData(string query)
{
    DataTable dt = new DataTable();
    SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand(query);
    String constr = ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["ConString"].ConnectionString;
    SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection(constr);
    SqlDataAdapter sda = new SqlDataAdapter();
    cmd.CommandType = CommandType.Text;
    cmd.Connection = con;
    sda.SelectCommand = cmd;
    sda.Fill(dt);
    return dt;
}

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ASPHostPortal.com provides its customers with Plesk Panel, one of the most popular and stable control panels for Windows hosting, as free. You could also see the latest .NET framework, a crazy amount of functionality as well as Large disk space, bandwidth, MSSQL databases and more. All those give people the convenience to build up a powerful site in Windows server. ASPHostPortal.com offers ASP.NET hosting starts from $1/month only. They also guarantees 30 days money back and guarantee 99.9% uptime. If you need a reliable affordable ASP.NET Hosting, ASPHostPortal.com should be your best choice.



ASP.NET Core 2 Hosting - How to Secure Your .NET Core 2.0 Web App

clock August 3, 2018 11:29 by author Kenny

Configuring ASP.NET Core to require authentication

Imagine we’re starting with an ASP.NET Core 2.0 MVC application (with no authentication mechanism configured).

You can grab the code we’re about to go through and take a look for yourself using the next link.

Get the code: Simple Authentication using ASP.NET Core 2.0
The first step is to enable authentication for our site, which we can do by modifying startup.cs.

We can start by adding the relevant Authentication services to our application.

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
    services.AddAuthentication(CookieAuthenticationDefaults.AuthenticationScheme)
        .AddCookie(CookieAuthenticationDefaults.AuthenticationScheme,
            options =>
            {
                options.LoginPath = new PathString("/auth/login");
                options.AccessDeniedPath = new PathString("/auth/denied");
            });
     // ---------------
     // rest of configureServices code goes here...
}

We’re going to stick with cookies for now. This means our logged in users will get a cookie in their browser, which gets passed to our app on every request, indicating that they are authenticated.

Notice how we’ve configured two paths, the path to the login page (where we can send unauthenticated people when they try to access a restricted area) and the path to an access denied page (useful for when they inevitably enter incorrect credentials).

We also need to tell our app to go ahead and actually enable authentication. Happily, this is very very simple in .NET Core 2…

public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app, IHostingEnvironment env)
{
    app.UseAuthentication();
    // ---------------
    // rest of configure code goes here...
}

Just another Login form

So now our app knows we’re going to be using authentication, but there’s more work to be done.

We need a way to identify our users, the common way being to ask them for a username and password.

Login forms are straightforward enough, here’s one to get us started.

<h2>Hmm, looks like you need to log in</h2>
<form asp-controller="Auth" asp-action="Login" method="post">
    <label for="username">Username</label>
    <input id="username" name="username" type="text"/>
    <label for="password">Password</label>
    <input id="password" name="password" type="password" />
    <button type="submit">Log me in</button>
</form>

If we’re using the default routing for MVC, you’ll want to create an AuthController with a Login action that returns this view.

If you’re not familiar with them, the asp- attributes are tag helpers, new to ASP.NET core, which make it easier to link your html to your ASP.NET MVC controllers. Read more about tag helpers here.

In this example, the form contents will be posted to the Login action on an Auth controller.

A word to the wise, if you start with an empty web app project you’ll find that Tag Helpers don’t work automatically.

The easiest way to get them working is to create a _ViewImports.cshtml file and add this line to it…

@addTagHelper *, Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc.TagHelpers

If you start with one of the other starter templates you’ll probably find this file is created for you.

The logging in bit

To keep this super, super simple, we’ll opt to hard-code a username and password for now.

If our users enter the correct combination, they’ll be logged in, with full access to “locked down” parts of the application.

Now let’s be honest, hardcoded usernames and passwords are somewhat limiting (and not at all secure if your code ends up in a public Github repo) but they do tackle our urgent requirement to provide a mechanism for users to log in, and gain access to parts of the site that will be unavailable to Joe Public.

This falls into the camp of “doing the simplest possible thing first”, so you can start to build up momentum with your new app, rather than getting bogged down in building your own user management system from day one.

The login form will post to this controller action…

[HttpPost, ValidateAntiForgeryToken]
public async Task<IActionResult> Login(string returnUrl, string username, string password)
{
    if (username == "Jon" && password == "ABitSimplisticForProductionUseThis...")
    {
        var claims = new List<Claim>
        {
            new Claim(ClaimTypes.Name, "jon", ClaimValueTypes.String, "
https://yourdomain.com")
        };
        var userIdentity = new ClaimsIdentity(claims, "SecureLogin");
        var userPrincipal = new ClaimsPrincipal(userIdentity);
        await HttpContext.SignInAsync(CookieAuthenticationDefaults.AuthenticationScheme,
            userPrincipal,
            new AuthenticationProperties
            {
                ExpiresUtc = DateTime.UtcNow.AddMinutes(20),
                IsPersistent = false,
                AllowRefresh = false
            });
        return GoToReturnUrl(returnUrl);
    }
    return RedirectToAction(nameof(Denied));
}

There’s our super insecure hardcoded username/password check (as discussed).

We’ve opted to use claims-based security.

In the most basic sense, you can think of Claims as pieces of information about your user. In this case we’re simply storing the user’s name in a claim, which we then attach to an identity for the user.

This identity is the representation of your user that ASP.NET core can interrogate, to find out anything it needs to know.

You can assign many claims to one identity, but ASP.NET Core requires the name claim as a minimum requirement (it will error if you don’t assign one).

Next up we create a user principal. If this is your first foray into ASP.NET Core authentication then this can be a little confusing, but it’s worth noting you could have more than one identity and attach them all to the same principal.

We’ve no need to handle multiple identities for the same user yet, so we can move along to the SignInAsync method on the HTTPContext, which logs our user in.

In practice, this creates an encrypted cookie holding the user’s information (the Claims Principal). From here on (until they exit the browser) your user is authenticated.

Because we’ve set IsPersistent to false, the cookie will be lost when our user exits their browser, and will have to log in again next time they come to the site.

If you want to see what that cookie looks like, check out the Application > Cookies window in Chrome (you’ll find a similar view in other browsers) and you’ll find it there, called .AspNetCore.Cookies.
Once they’re logged in, the user is redirected to the original page they requested, or the home page. You can do this with a simple helper method.

private IActionResult GoToReturnUrl(string returnUrl)
{
    if (Url.IsLocalUrl(returnUrl))
    {
        return Redirect(returnUrl);
    }
    return RedirectToAction("Index", "Home");
}

No access for you

This is all well and good, but currently there’s no reason for anyone to log in to the site, because nothing is locked down.

Let’s remedy that by restricting access to the main homepage for the app.

[Authorize]
public class HomeController : Controller
{
    public IActionResult Index()
    {
        return View();
    }
}

The [Authorize] attribute will trigger ASP.NET Core to redirect any users who aren’t logged in (don’t have an auth cookie) to the login page (that we configured in startup.cs).

It’s all about you

So that’s almost the entire process. But it would be nice to greet the user by name.

We’ll do this on our main index view…

<h1>Hi @User.Identity.Name, you're in the club.</h1>    

Let me out of here

Finally, we should probably let them log out, if they so wish.

All this needs is a simple form.

<form asp-controller="Auth" asp-action="Logout">
    <button type="submit">Log out</button>
</form>
And controller action.
public async Task<IActionResult> Logout()
{
    await HttpContext.SignOutAsync();
    return RedirectToAction(nameof(Login));
}

Best ASP.NET Hosting Recommendation
 

ASPHostPortal.com provides its customers with Plesk Panel, one of the most popular and stable control panels for Windows hosting, as free. You could also see the latest .NET framework, a crazy amount of functionality as well as Large disk space, bandwidth, MSSQL databases and more. All those give people the convenience to build up a powerful site in Windows server. ASPHostPortal.com offers ASP.NET hosting starts from $1/month only. They also guarantees 30 days money back and guarantee 99.9% uptime. If you need a reliable affordable ASP.NET Hosting, ASPHostPortal.com should be your best choice.



ASP.NET Core 2 Hosting - How to Use Bootstrap 4 in ASP.NET Core

clock July 31, 2018 08:47 by author Kenny

 So although you can still use it right now, Bootstrap has also announced to drop support for it. As a result, the built-in ASP.NET Core templates are slowly being edited to move away from it too.

Unfortunately, there is no clear path forward. This is mostly due to the fact that web applications are continuously moving further into the client-side, requiring complex client-side build systems and many dependencies. So if you are building something like that, you might already know how to solve this then, and you can expand your existing build process to simply also include Bootstrap and jQuery there.

But there are still many web applications out there that are not that heavy on the client-side, where the application still runs mainly on the server and the server serves static views as a result. Bower previously filled this by making it easy to just publish client-side dependencies without that much of a process.

In the .NET world we also have NuGet and with previous ASP.NET versions, we could use NuGet as well to add dependencies to some client-side dependencies since NuGet would just place the content into our project correctly. Unfortunately, with the new .csproj format and the new NuGet, installed packages are located outside of our project, so we cannot simply reference those.

This leaves us with a few options how to add our dependencies:

One-time installation

This is what the ASP.NET Core templates, that are not single-page applications, are currently doing. When you use those to create a new application, the wwwroot folder simply contains a folder lib that contains the dependencies:

If you look closely at the files currently, you can see that they were originally placed there with Bower to create the template, but that is likely to change soon. The basic idea is that the files are copied once to the wwwroot folder so you can depend on them.

To do this, we can simply follow Bootstrap’s introduction and download the compiled files directly. As mentioned on the download site, this does not include jQuery, so we need to download that separately too; it does contain Popper.js though if we choose to use the bootstrap.bundle file later—which we will do. For jQuery, we can simply get a single "compressed, production" file from the download site.

This leaves us with a few files which will simply extract and copy into the wwwroot folder. We can also make a lib folder to make it clearer that these are external dependencies:

That’s all we need, so now we just need to adjust our _Layout.cshtml file to include those dependencies. For that, we add the following block to the <head>:

<environment include="Development">
<link rel="stylesheet" href="~/lib/css/bootstrap.css" />
</environment>
<environment exclude="Development">
<link rel="stylesheet" href="~/lib/css/bootstrap.min.css" />
</environment>

And the following block at the very end of the <body>:

<environment include="Development">
<script src="~/lib/js/jquery-3.3.1.js"></script>
<script src="~/lib/js/bootstrap.bundle.js"></script>
</environment>
<environment exclude="Development">
<script src="~/lib/js/jquery-3.3.1.min.js"></script>
<script src="~/lib/js/bootstrap.bundle.min.js"></script>
</environment>

You can also just include the minified versions and skip the <environment> tag helpers here to make it a bit simpler. But that’s all you need to do to keep you starting.

Dependencies from NPM

The more modern way, also if you want to keep your dependencies updated, would be to get the dependencies from the NPM package repository. You can use either NPM or Yarn for this; in my example, I’ll use NPM.

To start off, we need to create a package.json file for our project, so we can specify our dependencies. To do this, we simply do that from the "Add New Item" dialog:

Once we have that, we need to edit it to include our dependencies. It should something look like this:

{
"version": "1.0.0",
"name": "asp.net",
"private": true,
"devDependencies": {
"bootstrap": "4.0.0",
"jquery": "3.3.1",
"popper.js": "1.12.9"
}
}

By saving, Visual Studio will already run NPM to install the dependencies for us. They will be installed into the node_modules folder. So what is left to do is to get the files from there into our wwwroot folder. There are a few options to do that:

bundleconfig.json for bundling and minification

We can use one of the various ways to consume a bundleconfig.json for bundling and minification, as explained in the documentation. A very easy way is to simply use the BuildBundlerMinifier NuGet package which automatically sets up a build task for this.

After installing that package, we need to create a bundleconfig.json at the root of the project with the following contents:

[
{
"outputFileName": "wwwroot/vendor.min.css",
"inputFiles": [
"node_modules/bootstrap/dist/css/bootstrap.min.css"
],
"minify": { "enabled": false }
},
{
"outputFileName": "wwwroot/vendor.min.js",
"inputFiles": [
"node_modules/jquery/dist/jquery.min.js",
"node_modules/popper.js/dist/umd/popper.min.js",
"node_modules/bootstrap/dist/js/bootstrap.min.js"
],
"minify": { "enabled": false }
}
]

This basically configures which files to combine into what. And when we build, we can see that the vendor.min.css and vendor.js.css are created correctly. So all we need to do is to adjust our _Layouts.html again to include those files:

<!-- inside <head> -->
<link rel="stylesheet" href="~/vendor.min.css" />
<!-- at the end of <body> -->
<script src="~/vendor.min.js"></script>

Using a task manager like Gulp

If we want to move a bit more into client-side development, we can also start to use tools that we would use there. For example Webpack which is a very commonly used build tool for really everything. But we can also start with a simpler task manager like Gulp and do the few necessary steps ourselves.

For that, we add a gulpfile.js into our project root, with the following contents:

const gulp = require('gulp');
const concat = require('gulp-concat');
const vendorStyles = [
"node_modules/bootstrap/dist/css/bootstrap.min.css"
];
const vendorScripts = [
"node_modules/jquery/dist/jquery.min.js",
"node_modules/popper.js/dist/umd/popper.min.js",
"node_modules/bootstrap/dist/js/bootstrap.min.js",
];
gulp.task('default', ['build-vendor']);
gulp.task('build-vendor', ['build-vendor-css', 'build-vendor-js']);
gulp.task('build-vendor-css', () => {
return gulp.src(vendorStyles)
.pipe(concat('vendor.min.css'))
.pipe(gulp.dest('wwwroot'));
});
gulp.task('build-vendor-js', () => {
return gulp.src(vendorScripts)
.pipe(concat('vendor.min.js'))
.pipe(gulp.dest('wwwroot'));
});

Now, we also need to adjust our package.json to have dependencies on gulp and gulp-concat:

{
"version": "1.0.0",
"name": "asp.net",
"private": true,
"devDependencies": {
"bootstrap": "4.0.0",
"gulp": "^3.9.1",
"gulp-concat": "^2.6.1",
"jquery": "3.3.1",
"popper.js": "1.12.9"
}
}

Finally, we edit our .csproj to add the following task which makes sure that our Gulp task runs when we build the project:

<Target Name="RunGulp" BeforeTargets="Build">
<Exec Command="node_modules\.bin\gulp.cmd" />
</Target>

Now, when we build, the default Gulp task runs, which runs the build-vendor tasks, which then builds our vendor.min.css and vendor.min.js just like we did before. So after adjusting our _Layout.cshtml just like above, we can make use of jQuery and Bootstrap.

While the initial setup of Gulp is a bit more complicated than the bundleconfig.json one above, we have now have entered the Node-world and can start to make use of all the other cool tools there. So it might be worth to start with this.

Best ASP.NET Hosting Recommendation

ASPHostPortal.com provides its customers with Plesk Panel, one of the most popular and stable control panels for Windows hosting, as free. You could also see the latest .NET framework, a crazy amount of functionality as well as Large disk space, bandwidth, MSSQL databases and more. All those give people the convenience to build up a powerful site in Windows server. ASPHostPortal.com offers ASP.NET hosting starts from $1/month only. They also guarantees 30 days money back and guarantee 99.9% uptime. If you need a reliable affordable ASP.NET Hosting, ASPHostPortal.com should be your best choice.



ASP.NET Core 2 Hosting - Creating A GraphQL Endpoint in ASP.NET Core

clock July 24, 2018 08:25 by author Kenny

The Graph Query Language

The GraphQL was invented by Facebook in 2012 and released to the public in 2015. It is a query language to tell the API exactly about the data you wanna have. This is the difference between REST, where you need to query different resources/URIs to get different data. In GrapgQL there is one single point of access about the data you want to retrieve.

That also makes the planning about the API a little more complex. You need to think about what data you wanna provide and you need to think about how you wanna provide that data.

While playing around with it, I created a small book database. The idea is to provide data about books and authors.

Let's have a look into few examples. The query to get the book number and the name of a specific book looks like this.

{
book(isbn: "822-5-315140-65-3"){
isbn,
name
}
}

This look similar to JSON but it isn't. The property names are not set in quotes, which means it is not really a JavaScript Object Notation. This query need to be sent inside the body of an POST request to the server.

The Query gets parsed and executed against a data source on the server and the server should send the result back to the client:

{
"data": {
"book": {
"isbn": "822-5-315140-65-3",
"name": "ultrices enim mauris parturient a"
}
}
}

If we want to know something about the author, we need to ask about it:

{
book(isbn: "822-5-315140-65-3"){
isbn,
name,
author{
id,
name,
birthdate
}
}
}

This is the possible result:

{
"data": {
"book": {
"isbn": "822-5-315140-65-3",
"name": "ultrices enim mauris parturient a",
"author": {
"id": 71,
"name": "Henderson",
"birthdate": "1937-03-20T06:58:44Z"
}
}
}
}

You need a list of books, including the authors? Just ask for it:

{
books{
isbn,
name,
author{
id,
name,
birthdate
}
}
}

The list is too large? Just limit the result, to get only 20 items:

{
books(limit: 20) {
isbn,
name,
author{
id,
name,
birthdate
}
}
}

The Book Database

The book database is just fake. I love to use GenFu to generate dummy data. So I did the same for the books and the authors and created a BookRepository:

public class BookRepository : IBookRepository
{
private IEnumerable<Book> _books = new List<Book>();
private IEnumerable<Author> _authors = new List<Author>();
public BookRepository()
{
GenFu.GenFu.Configure<Author>()
.Fill(_ => _.Name).AsLastName()
.Fill(_=>_.Birthdate).AsPastDate();
_authors = A.ListOf<Author>(40);
GenFu.GenFu.Configure<Book>()
.Fill(p => p.Isbn).AsISBN()
.Fill(p => p.Name).AsLoremIpsumWords(5)
.Fill(p => p.Author).WithRandom(_authors);
_books = A.ListOf<Book>(100);
}
public IEnumerable<Author> AllAuthors()
{
return _authors;
}
public IEnumerable<Book> AllBooks()
{
return _books;
}
public Author AuthorById(int id)
{
return _authors.First(_ => _.Id == id);
}
public Book BookByIsbn(string isbn)
{
return _books.First(_ => _.Isbn == isbn);
}
}
public static class StringFillerExtensions
{
public static GenFuConfigurator<T> AsISBN<T>(
this GenFuStringConfigurator<T> configurator) where T : new()
{
var filler = new CustomFiller<string>(
configurator.PropertyInfo.Name, 
typeof(T), 
() =>
{
return MakeIsbn();
});
configurator.Maggie.RegisterFiller(filler);
return configurator;
}

public static string MakeIsbn()
{
// 978-1-933988-27-6
var a = A.Random.Next(100, 999);
var b = A.Random.Next(1, 9);
var c = A.Random.Next(100000, 999999);
var d = A.Random.Next(10, 99);
var e = A.Random.Next(1, 9);
return $"{a}-{b}-{c}-{d}-{e}";
}
}

GenFu provides a useful set of so called fillers to generate data randomly. There are fillers to generate URLs, emails, names, last names, states of US and Canada and so on. I also need a ISBN generator, so I created one by extending the generic GenFuStringConfigurator.

The BookRepository is registered as a singleton in the Dependency Injection container, to work with the same set of data while the application is running. You are able to add some more information to that repository, like publishers and so on.

GraphQL in ASP.NET Core

Fortunately there is a .NET Standard compatible implementation of the GraphQL on GitHub. So there's no need to parse the Queries by yourself. This library is also available as a NuGet package:

<PackageReference Include="GraphQL" Version="0.15.1.678" />

The examples provided on GitHub, are pretty easy. They directly write the result to the output, which means the entire ASP.NET Applications is a GraphQL server. But I want to add GraphQL as a ASP.NET Core MiddleWare, to add the GraphQL implementation as a different part of the Application. Like this you are able to use REST based POST and PUT request to add or update the data and to use the GraphQL to query the data.

I also want that the middleware is listening to the sub path "/graph"

public class GraphQlMiddleware
{
private readonly RequestDelegate _next;
private readonly IBookRepository _bookRepository;
public GraphQlMiddleware(RequestDelegate next, IBookRepository bookRepository)
{
_next = next;
_bookRepository = bookRepository;
}
public async Task Invoke(HttpContext httpContext)
{
var sent = false;
if (httpContext.Request.Path.StartsWithSegments("/graph"))
{
using (var sr = new StreamReader(httpContext.Request.Body))
{
var query = await sr.ReadToEndAsync();
if (!String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(query))
{
var schema = new Schema { Query = new BooksQuery(_bookRepository) };
var result = await new DocumentExecuter()
.ExecuteAsync(options =>
{
options.Schema = schema;
options.Query = query;
}).ConfigureAwait(false);
CheckForErrors(result);
await WriteResult(httpContext, result);
sent = true;
}
}
}
if (!sent)
{
await _next(httpContext);
}
}
private async Task WriteResult(HttpContext httpContext, ExecutionResult result)
{
var json = new DocumentWriter(indent: true).Write(result);
httpContext.Response.StatusCode = 200;
httpContext.Response.ContentType = "application/json";
await httpContext.Response.WriteAsync(json);
}
private void CheckForErrors(ExecutionResult result)
{
if (result.Errors?.Count > 0)
{
var errors = new List<Exception>();
foreach (var error in result.Errors)
{
var ex = new Exception(error.Message);
if (error.InnerException != null)
{
ex = new Exception(error.Message, error.InnerException);
}
errors.Add(ex);
}
throw new AggregateException(errors);
}
}
}
public static class GraphQlMiddlewareExtensions
{
public static IApplicationBuilder UseGraphQL(this IApplicationBuilder builder)
{
return builder.UseMiddleware<GraphQlMiddleware>();
}
}

With this kind of MiddleWare, I can extend my applications Startup.cs with GraphQL:

app.UseGraphQL();

As you can see, the BookRepository gets passed into this Middleware via constructor injection. The most important part is that line:

var schema = new Schema { Query = new BooksQuery(_bookRepository) };

This is where we create a schema, which is used by the GraphQL engine to provide the data. The schema defines the structure of the data you wanna provide. This is all done in a root type called BooksQuery. This type gets the BookRepostory.

This Query is a GryphType, provided by the GraphQL library. You need to derive from a ObjectGraphType and to configure the schema in the constructor:

public class BooksQuery : ObjectGraphType
{
public BooksQuery(IBookRepository bookRepository)
{
Field<BookType>("book",
arguments: new QueryArguments(
new QueryArgument<StringGraphType>() { Name = "isbn" }),
resolve: context =>
{
var id = context.GetArgument<string>("isbn");
return bookRepository.BookByIsbn(id);
});
Field<ListGraphType<BookType>>("books",
resolve: context =>
{
return bookRepository.AllBooks();
});
}
}

Using the GraphQL library all types used in the Query to define the schema are any kind of GraphTypes, even the BookType:

public class BookType : ObjectGraphType<Book>
{
public BookType()
{
Field(x => x.Isbn).Description("The isbn of the book.");
Field(x => x.Name).Description("The name of the book.");
Field<AuthorType>("author");
}
}

The difference is just the generic ObjectGraphType which is also used for the AuthorType. The properties of the Book, which are simple types like the name or the ISBN are mapped directly with the lambda. The complex typed properties like the Author are mapped via another generic ObjectGraphType, which is ObjectGraphType in that case.

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ASP.NET Hosting - ASPhostPortal.com :: Tips Create User Roles in ASP.NET MVC

clock December 20, 2016 04:54 by author Armend

ASP.NET MVC 5 is the latest update to Microsoft's popular MVC (Model-View-Controller) technology - an established web application framework. MVC enables developers to build dynamic, data-driven web sites. MVC 5 adds sophisticated features like single page applications, mobile optimization, adaptive rendering, and more.

In this article, We'll look into how to create default user roles in ASP.NET MVC 5. Let's begin by establishing where the user role is assigned, and that is the registration stage. In the default template, you have the AccountController that contains a Register action. The default implementation looks like this:

[HttpPost]
[AllowAnonymous]
[ValidateAntiForgeryToken]
public ActionResult Register(RegisterModel model)
{
    if (ModelState.IsValid)
    {
        // Attempt to register the user
        try
        {
            WebSecurity.CreateUserAndAccount(model.UserName, model.Password);
            WebSecurity.Login(model.UserName, model.Password);
            return RedirectToAction("Index", "Home");
        }
        catch (MembershipCreateUserException e)
        {
            ModelState.AddModelError("", ErrorCodeToString(e.StatusCode));
        }
    }
    // If we got this far, something failed, redisplay form
    return View(model);
}


What's missing here is the role assignment, so let's add that. Right after the CreateUserAndAccount call, we can check whether a specific role exists, and if it is - add the registered user to it. In case the role is new, create it.

if (!Roles.RoleExists("Standard"))
    Roles.CreateRole("Standard");
Roles.AddUserToRole(model.UserName, "Standard");


Here I am working with a role called Standard, but obviously you can use another identifier for it. If you open the database that is carrying the app data, you will notice that there are two new tables introduced in the existing context - Roles and UsersInRoles.

As the data skeleton is established, you can now limit content access based on roles. In views, you could use the Authorize attribute:

[Authorize(Roles = "Admin")]

Or you could check for the role directly:


@if (Roles.GetRolesForUser().Contains("Admin"))
{
}

 

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ASP.NET Hosting - ASPHostPortal.com :: Tips to Create Create WebGrid with Expand in ASP.NET MVC

clock September 6, 2016 19:53 by author Armend

Introduction

In this post, I am explain How to Create Nested WebGrid with Expand/Collapse in ASP.NET MVC 6.
Steps :

Step - 1 : Create New Project.

  • Go to File > New > Project > Select asp.net MVC6 web application > Entry Application Name > Click OK > Select Internet Application > Select view engine Razor > OK

Step-2: Add a Database.

  • Go to Solution Explorer > Right Click on App_Data folder > Add > New item > Select SQL Server Database Under Data > Enter Database name > Add.

Step-3: Create table for fetch data.

  • Open Database > Right Click on Table > Add New Table > Add Columns > Save > Enter table name > OK.

In this example, I have used two tables as below

Step-4: Add Entity Data Model.

  • Go to Solution Explorer > Right Click on Project name form Solution Explorer > Add > New item > Select ADO.net Entity Data Model under data > Enter model name > Add.
  • A popup window will come (Entity Data Model Wizard) > Select Generate from database > Next >
  • Chose your data connection > select your database > next > Select tables > enter Model Namespace > Finish.

Step-5: Add a class for create a view model.

  • 1st : Add a folder.
  • Go to Solution Explorer > Right Click on the project > add > new folder.
  • 2nd : Add a class on that folder
  • Go to Solution Explorer > Right Click on that folder > Add > Class... > Enter Class name > Add.

Write the following code in this class

using System.Collections.Generic;
namespace MVCNestedWebgrid.ViewModel
{
    public class OrderVM
    {
        public OrderMaster order { get; set; }
        public List<OrderDetail> orderDetails { get; set; }
    }
}

Step-6: Add a new Controller.

  • Go to Solution Explorer > Right Click on Controllers folder form Solution Explorer > Add > Controller > Enter Controller name > Select Templete "empty MVC Controller"> Add.

Step-7: Add new action into your controller for show nested data in a webgrid.

Here I have added "List" Action into "Order" Controller. Please write this following code

public ActionResult List()
{
    List<OrderVM> allOrder = new List<OrderVM>();
 
    // here MyDatabaseEntities is our data context
    using (MyDatabaseEntities dc = new MyDatabaseEntities())
    {
        var o = dc.OrderMasters.OrderByDescending(a => a.OrderID);
        foreach (var i in o)
        {
            var od = dc.OrderDetails.Where(a => a.OrderID.Equals(i.OrderID)).ToList();
            allOrder.Add(new OrderVM { order= i, orderDetails = od });
        }
    }
    return View(allOrder);
}

Step-8: Add view for the Action & design.

  • Right Click on Action Method (here right click on form action) > Add View... > Enter View Name > Select View Engine (Razor) > Check "Create a strong-typed view" > Select your model class > Add.

NOTE " Please Rebuild solution before add view

Html Code
@model IEnumerable<MVCNestedWebgrid.ViewModel.OrderVM>

@{
    ViewBag.Title = "Order List";
    WebGrid grid = new WebGrid(source: Model, canSort: false);
}
<div id="main" style="padding:25px; background-color:white;">
    @grid.GetHtml(
    htmlAttributes: new {id="gridT", width="700px" },
    columns:grid.Columns(
            grid.Column("order.OrderID","Order ID"),
            grid.Column(header:"Order Date",format:(item)=> string.Format("{0:dd-MM-yyyy}",item.order.OrderDate)),
            grid.Column("order.CustomerName","Customer Name"),
            grid.Column("order.CustomerAddress","Address"),
            grid.Column(format:(item)=>{
                WebGrid subGrid = new WebGrid(source: item.orderDetails);
                return subGrid.GetHtml(
                    htmlAttributes: new { id="subT" },
                    columns:subGrid.Columns(
                            subGrid.Column("Product","Product"),
                            subGrid.Column("Quantity", "Quantity"),
                            subGrid.Column("Rate", "Rate"),
                            subGrid.Column("Amount", "Amount")
                        )                   
                    );
            })
        )
    )
</div>
Css Code
<style>
th, td {
        padding:5px;
    }
    th
    {
        background-color:rgb(248, 248, 248);       
    }
    #gridT,  #gridT tr {
        border:1px solid #0D857B;
    }
    #subT,#subT tr {
        border:1px solid #f3f3f3;
    }
    #subT {
        margin:0px 0px 0px 10px;
        padding:5px;
        width:95%;
    }
    #subT th {
        font-size:12px;
    }
    .hoverEff {
        cursor:pointer;
    }
    .hoverEff:hover {
        background-color:rgb(248, 242, 242);
    }
    .expand {
        background-image: url(/Images/pm.png);
        background-position-x: -22px;
        background-repeat:no-repeat;
    }
    .collapse  {
        background-image: url(/Images/pm.png);
        background-position-x: -2px;
        background-repeat:no-repeat;
    }
</style>
Write the following Jquery code for make webgrid collapsible
<script>
    $(document).ready(function () {
        var size = $("#main #gridT > thead > tr >th").size(); // get total column
        $("#main #gridT > thead > tr >th").last().remove(); // remove last column
        $("#main #gridT > thead > tr").prepend("<th></th>"); // add one column at first for collapsible column
        $("#main #gridT > tbody > tr").each(function (i, el) {
            $(this).prepend(
                    $("<td></td>")
                    .addClass("expand")
                    .addClass("hoverEff")
                    .attr('title',"click for show/hide")
                );
            //Now get sub table from last column and add this to the next new added row
            var table = $("table", this).parent().html();
            //add new row with this subtable
            $(this).after("<tr><td></td><td style='padding:5px; margin:0px;' colspan='" + (size - 1) + "'>" + table + "</td></tr>");
            $("table", this).parent().remove();
            // ADD CLICK EVENT FOR MAKE COLLAPSIBLE
            $(".hoverEff", this).live("click", function () {
                $(this).parent().closest("tr").next().slideToggle(100);
                $(this).toggleClass("expand collapse");
            });
        });
        //by default make all subgrid in collapse mode
        $("#main #gridT > tbody > tr td.expand").each(function (i, el) {
            $(this).toggleClass("expand collapse");
            $(this).parent().closest("tr").next().slideToggle(100);
        });    
    });
</script>

 

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ASP.NET Hosting - ASPHostPortal.com :: How to Publishing an ASP.NET 5 Project to a Local IIS Server

clock June 16, 2016 17:45 by author Armend

In this post we will show you how to publishing an ASP.NET 5 project to a local IIS server. Recently I deployed a new ASP.NET 5 web application to a local IIS server. Though there are several online resources available about deployment, I encountered some problems that were difficult to diagnose and fix. In this post I will talk about the general deployment process and the steps I followed for a successful deployment.

ASP.NET 5 applications are meant to be cross-platform. Included in this cross-platform effort is the development of a new, cross-platform web server, named Kestrel. The Kestrel web server can be activated from the command line and can be used on any operating system.
Of course, ASP.NET 5 applications can still be hosted in IIS. But even in this case, the underlying web server will still be Kestrel. The role of IIS is greatly minimized.
In this post we will be deploying a web application using Kestrel as a web host first. Afterwards, we will be deploying to IIS.

Deployment to Kestrel

Let's say that we have an existing ASP.NET 5 application. We can publish the application from the command line. First, navigate to the root web folder of the application (the folder where the project.json file is in). Then, type in the following command:

dnu publish --runtime active -o ..\publish

What this will do is create a new folder named 'publish' alongside the root web folder. Inside this 'publish' folder , there will be three subfolders: 'approot', 'logs', and 'wwwroot'. The 'approot' folder will contain the source files and packages needed by the application. The 'logs' folder will contain any logs that the application emits. The 'wwwroot' folder will contain javascript, html, css files, etc. as well as the web.config file.
Now we can start the Kestrel web server. First, navigate to the 'approot' folder. There will be a file named web.cmd. Start it by typing 'web' from the command line or double-clicking on it from a windows explorer window.

You might notice that a lot of text appears on the command line as soon as the command is run. This is especially true when there are Entity Framework migrations involved. Among the sea of text, the URL of the localhost web server will be displayed, and will look something like this:

Hosting Environment: Production
Now listening on: http://localhost:5000
Application started. Press Ctrl+C to shut down.

Once we find this text, we can just navigate to the appropriate URL using a browser. There we should see the web app up and running.
Congratulations, we have just deployed our ASP.NET 5 web application!
Deployment to IIS
Once we successfully launch the app through Kestrel, we can go for deploying in IIS. We need to do a few things for it to work properly.

  • Use an application pool with No Managed Code as the .NET CLR Version.
  • Create a Login in SQL Server with the login name as IIS APPPOOL\{apppoolname}. This Login should have access to whatever database the web application will use.
  • Create access rights to the 'wwwroot' folder for the user group IIS_IUSRS.

In addition, if we are going to put the application inside IIS Default Web Site and use a virtual directory, we need to modify the Startup.cs to handle this.
The first step is to rename the Configure method to something else, for example Configure1.
Then, we need to create a new Configure method. This would have the same signature as the original Configure method. The implementation would look something like this:

public async void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app, IHostingEnvironment env, ILoggerFactory loggerFactory)
{
    app.Map("/virtualdirectoryname", (app1) => this.Configure1(app1, env, loggerFactory));
}

So we see that this new Configure method just calls the Configure1 method, taking into account the virtual directory name.
Once all of these are in place, we can go ahead and deploy to IIS using the usual process. We can add a new application in IIS Default Web Site and use the application pool we created earlier (using No Managed Code). The physical path should point to the 'wwwroot' location. The alias should be the same as the one we put in the Configure method in Startup.cs.
Afterwards, just browse to the website and it should all be good!

Conclusion

Although the concept of deployment stayed the same, the process and tools involved for deploying ASP.NET 5 applications has changed. In this post we took a look at how to deploy to the Kestrel web server, then later to IIS. Though it might seem like a long process, most of the steps should only be performed the first time around. Subsequent deployments should be faster and more straightforward.



ASP.NET Core 1.0 Hosting - ASPHostPortal.com :: How To Configure your ASP.‚ÄčNET Core 1.0 Application

clock June 14, 2016 20:26 by author Armend

The Web.Config is gone and the AppSettings are gone with ASP.NET Core 1.0. How do we configure our ASP.NET Core Application now? With the Web.Config, also the config transform feature is gone. How do we configure a ASP.NET Core Application for specific deployment environments?

Configuring

Unfortunately a newly started ASP.NET Core Application doesn't include a complete configuration as a sample. This makes the jump-start a little difficult. The new Configuration is quite better than the old one and it would make sense to add some settings by default. Anyway, lets start by creating a new Project.
Open the Startup.cs and take a look at the controller. There's already something like a configuration setup. This is exactly what the newly created application needs to run.

public Startup(IHostingEnvironment env)
{
    // Set up configuration sources.
    var builder = new ConfigurationBuilder()
        .AddJsonFile("appsettings.json")
        .AddEnvironmentVariables();
    if (env.IsDevelopment())
    {
        // This will push telemetry data through Application Insights
        // pipeline faster, allowing you to view results immediately.
        builder.AddApplicationInsightsSettings(developerMode: true);
    }
    Configuration = builder.Build();
}

But in the most cases you need much more configuration. This code creates a ConfigurationBuilder and adds a appsettigns.json and environment variables to the ConfigurationBuilder. In development mode, it also adds ApplicationInsights settings.
If you take a look into the appsettings.json, you'll only find a ApplicationInsights key and some logging specific settings (In case you chose a individual authentication you'll also

see a connection string):
{
  "ApplicationInsights": {
    "InstrumentationKey": ""
  },
  "Logging": {
    "IncludeScopes": false,
    "LogLevel": {
      "Default": "Verbose",
      "System": "Information",
      "Microsoft": "Information"
    }
  }
}

Where do we need to store our custom application settings?
We can use this appsettings.json or any other JSON file to store our settings. Let's use the existing one to add a new section called AppSettings:

{
...
    "AppSettings" : {
        "ApplicationTitle" : "My Application Title",
        "TopItemsOnStart" : 10,
        "ShowEditLink" : true
    }
}

This looks nice, but how do we read this settings?

In the Startup.cs the Configuration is already built and we could use it like this:

var configurationSection = Configuration.GetSection("AppSettings");
var title = configurationSection.Get<string>("ApplicationTitle");
var topItmes = configurationSection.Get<int>("TopItemsOnStart");
var showLink = configurationSection.Get<bool>("ShowEditLink");
We can also provide a default value in case that item doesn't exist or in case it is null
var topItmes = configurationSection.Get<int>("TopItemsOnStart", 15);

To use it everywhere we need to register the IConfigurationRoot to the dependency injection container:

services.AddInstance<IConfigurationRoot>(Configuration);

But this seems not to be a really useful way to provide the application settings to our application. And it looks almost similar as in the previous ASP.NET Versions. But the new configuration is pretty much better. In previous versions we created a settings facade to encapsulate the settings, to not access the configuration directly and to get typed settings.
No we just need to create a simple POCO to provide access to the settings globally inside the application:

public class AppSettings
{
    public string ApplicationTitle { get; set; }
    public int TopItemsOnStart { get; set; }
    public bool ShowEditLink { get; set; }
}

The properties of this class should match the keys in the configuration section. Is this done we are able to map the section to that AppSettings class:

services.Configure<AppSettings>(Configuration.GetSection("AppSettings"));

This fills our AppSettings class with the values from the configuration section. This code also adds the settings to the IoC container and we are now able to use it everywhere in the application by requesting for the IOptions<AppSettings>:

public class HomeController : Controller
{
    private readonly AppSettings _settings
    public HomeController(IOptions<AppSettings> settings)
    {
        _settings = settings.Value;
    }
    public IActionResult Index()
    {
        ViewData["Message"] = _settings.ApplicationTitle;
        return View();
    }

Even directly in the view:

@inject IOptions<AppSettings> AppSettings
@{
    ViewData["Title"] = AppSettings.Value.ApplicationTitle;
}
<h2>@ViewData["Title"].</h2>
<ul>
    @for (var i = 0; i < AppSettings.Value.TopItemsOnStart; i++)
    {
        <li>
            <span>Item no. @i</span><br/>
            @if (AppSettings.Value.ShowEditLink) {
                <a asp-action="Edit" asp-controller="Home"
                   asp-route-id="@i">Edit</a>
            }
        </li>
    }
</ul>

With this approach, you are able to create as many configuration sections as you need and you are able to provide as many settings objects as you need to your application.
What do you think about it? Please let me know and drop a comment.

Environment specific configuration

Now we need to have differnt configurations per deployment environment. Let's assume we have a production, a staging and a development environment where we run our application. All this environments need another configuration, another connections string, mail settings, Azure access keys, whatever...
Let's go back to the Startup.cs to have a look into the constructor. We can use the IHostingEnvironment to load different appsettings.json files per environment. But we can do this in a pretty elegant way:

.AddJsonFile("appsettings.json")
.AddJsonFile($"appsettings.{env.EnvironmentName}.json", optional: true)

We can just load another JSON file with an environment specific name and with optional set to true. Let's say the appsettings.json contain the production and the default

  • settings and the appsettings.Staging.json contains the staging sepcific settings. It we are running in Staging mode, the second settings file will be loaded and the existing settings will be overridden by the new one. We just need to sepcify the settings we want to override.
  • Setting the flag optional to true means, the settings file doesn't need to exist. Whith this approatch you can commit some default setings to the source code repository and the top secret access keys and connections string, could be stored in an appsettings.Development.json, an appsettings.staging.json and an appsettings.Production.json on the buildserver or on the webserver directly.

Conclusion

As you can see, configuration in ASP.NET Core is pretty easy. You just need to know how to do it. Because it is not directly visible in a new project, it is a bit difficult to find the way to start.

 



ASP.NET Hosting - ASPHostPortal.com :: ASP.NET MVC vs ASP.NET - Which is better?

clock June 3, 2016 22:54 by author Dan

When developers start to build new web projects they face two options- either using ASP.NET MVC framework or ASP.NET web forms. These days, more and more companies are however choosing the MVC based framework to revise their existing sites significantly or to develop new ones. The framework has a multitude of benefits as well as technical goodies which have made it the darling among the developers.

MVC, short for Model-View-Controller is an architectural pattern that helps in division of an application into three basic components- the controller, the model and the view. This framework is a great alternative to the web forms pattern when creating applications since it is highly testable as well as lightweight presentation framework. It comes integrated with all current .NET features like authentication based on membership as well as master pages. Most developers are quite familiar with the pattern. Here is a low-down on the advantages that the MVC based framework offers over the web forms.

Separating application tasks or concerns- A huge advantage in the framework is that it clearly separates Business Logic, Data, Model, UI, test-driven development and testability. Core contracts of the framework are interface-based for which mock objects may be used for the testing. These mock objects are simulated objects imitating the behaviours of application's actual objects. The application can be unit-tested without making the controllers run, making the testing more flexible as well as fast. Any framework may be used for the testing.

Clientcaching

Silverlight makes this available to us. When we integrate Silverlight full advantage may be taken of the feature. This leads to faster application loading; in fact some part of processing may be done through web browsers, this makes the execution of client site as well as the server side a lot faster. You can even integrate JQuery and MVC so that the code written runs in browser, taking away a huge load away from the server.

HTML size

In ASP.NET there is a huge problem in the HTML size of view state as well as controls. All data rendered is stored by view state with the final result being the final HTML getting too large. For those on slow internet connections, the loading time will be slow as well as delayed. The current framework takes care of that problem since the view state concept is absent here.

Supporting ASP.NET routing

This URL-mapping component is very powerful, letting you build applications with searchable and comprehensible URLs. Through this there is no need for URLs to include extensions of file-names since the design supports patterns of URL naming and these work good enough for SEO or search engine optimization as well as REST or representational state transfer addressing.

Pluggable as well as extensible framework

The design of MVC's components makes them easily customizable or replaceable. Individual view engine, action-method parameter serialization, URL routing policy as well as other components can be plugged in. The use of DI or Dependency Injection and IOC or Inversion of Control container models is also supported. With DI you can inject objects into classes and it does not rely on class for creation of object itself. The testing is made easier by the condition imposed that when an object is required by another object then another object should be sourced from an external source like configuration file.

The biggest advantage of ASP.NET MVC platform is that it contains all the features as well as advantages of .NET since the basis is the same for both. However, some disadvantages are that understanding codes during the process of customization may not be an easy process. Another problem is the cost- the start-up costs are much higher in the MVC platform when compared to the web form based one. But looking at the benefits that are enjoyed by the developers and the end result, this is but a small price to pay for. You can get in touch with a asp.net application development company who can help you develop web apps that are stable, scalable and secure.

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