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ASP.NET Hosting - ASPHostPortal.com :: How to Check Duplicate User Names In ASP.NET Web Pages Sites

clock October 5, 2015 11:39 by author Kenny

How to Check Duplicate User Names In ASP.NET Web Pages Sites

The Web Pages Starter Site template provides a useful starting point for developing a Razor Web Pages site that includes membership. But it doesn't include any mechanism for preventing duplicate user names. This article offers one solution to the problem that uses jQuery.

If you ask how to prevent duplicate user names in forums, one of the suggestions that is often put forward is to apply a unique constraint in the database column that holds the user name. Any attempt to submit a duplicate value will result in an exception being raised in the relevant database provider. You can catch this exception and show the user an appropriate message. This works but it's a fairly clunky solution. And many people feel that you should not use exceptions as a means to manage your business rules.

The solution featured in this article uses AJAX to query the database and to give the user immediate feedback when they enter their chosen user name. The AJAX call requests a page that exists purely to query the database to see if the selected user name is already in use. The solution also includes a server side chekc to ensure that users who have disabled JavaScript so not slip through the net. The solution requires a couple of amendments to the Register.cshtml file in the Starter Site, and the addition of 3 files. But first, the changes to the Register.cshtml page. The first change is in the inclusion of a JavaScript file called dupecheck.js.

@* Remove this section if you are using bundling *@
@section Scripts {
    <script src="~/Scripts/jquery.validate.min.js"></script>
    <script src="~/Scripts/jquery.validate.unobtrusive.min.js"></script>
    <script src="~/Scripts/dupecheck.js"></script>
}

And the second is the server side check to see if the username is in use:

if(Functions.IsDuplicate(email)){
    ModelState.AddError("email", "User name is already taken");
}

I placed this in the if(IsPost) section just after the initial variables that represent the submitted values (email, password and confirmPassword) are declared. The code calls a function named IsDuplicate. The function is declared in a file called Functions.cshtml which is placed in a folder called App_Code:

@functions {
    public static bool IsDuplicate(string username){
        var db = Database.Open("StarterSite");
        var commandText = @"SELECT COUNT(Email) FROM UserProfile WHERE Email = @0";
        return (int)db.QueryValue(commandText, username) > 0;
    }
}

Note that the name of the folder is important. The function returns a bool. The value of the bool is determined as a result if the SQL query which gets a count of the rows containing the provided user name. By default, the Starter Site uses a column called Email in the UserProfile table for the storage of user names. This function is also called in a separate file named DupeCheck.cshtml. This file is placed in the root of the site:

@{
    Layout = null;
    if(IsAjax){
        var username = Request["username"];
        var result = Functions.IsDuplicate(username);
        Json.Write(new { isDupe = result }, Response.Output);
    }
}

DupeCheck.cshtml is designed to work exclusively with AJAX. The code includes an instruction to nullify any layout pages that might have been set in a _PageStart file, and then it uses the IsAjax property to determine if the page has been requested via an AJAX call. If it has, it uses the IsDuplicate method to check the availability of the posted username and returns the result to the calling code. The result is an anonymous type that has one propery: isDupe, which is a boolean. The anonymous type is serialised to JSON by the Json helper.

The final part of the solution is the dupecheck.js file. This uses jQuery:

$(function () {
    $('#email').change(function () {
        $.post(
            '/DupeCheck',
            { username: $(this).val() },
            function (data) {
                var emailValidation = $('span[data-valmsg-for="email"]');
                if (data.isDupe) {
                    if (emailValidation.hasClass('field-validation-valid')) {
                        emailValidation.removeClass('field-validation-valid');
                        emailValidation.addClass('field-validation-error');
                        emailValidation.text('That name is already taken!');
                    }
                } else {
                    if (emailValidation.hasClass('field-validation-error')) {
                        emailValidation.removeClass('field-validation-error');
                        emailValidation.addClass('field-validation-valid');
                        emailValidation.text('');
                    }
                }
            },'json'
        );
    });
});

An event handler is attached to the change event of the user name input (which has an id if email in the Starter Site). The current value is posted to the DupeCheck.cshtml page via AJAX. The code above checks the response from the server to see if the value is a duplicate, and if it is, an appropriate error message is displayed to the user.

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ASP.NET Hosting - ASPHostPortal.com :: Easy to Design Pie Chart and Donut Chart in ASP.NET

clock September 28, 2015 12:40 by author Kenny

Easy to Design Pie Chart and Donut Chart in ASP.NET

D3.js stands for Data-Driven Document. It is a JavaScript library using which we can manipulate documents based on data. The data can be fetched using multiple ways like Web Services, WCF Services, REST APIs or the relatively new Microsoft ASP.NET Web API amongst many others. Using D3, you can bind the data to the Document Object Model (DOM) and present that data with rich visualizations. D3 internally makes use of CSS, HTML and SVG capabilities to make your data presentable. It is powerful, fast and supports large datasets and dynamic behaviors for interactions and powerful and smooth animations.

D3.js provides easy and declarative selections of DOM nodes using W3C Selector APIs. D3 Selector APIs provides number of methods to manipulate nodes. For example –

  • Setting attributes and applying rich styles
  • Registering Event Listeners
  • You can add, remove and sort DOM nodes
  • You can change the HTML or the text contents of HTML elements
  • You can also have a direct selection/access to the DOM as each selection is an array of nodes

Likewise, we have various features of D3.js selectors which we can use to present data to our DOM nodes.

A simple selector example is the following:

var bodySelection = d3.select('body').style('background-color', 'blue');

In the above example, we are selecting body and changing its background color to blue. Another example would be as follows:

var divSelection = d3.selectAll('div').style('background-color', 'yellow');

In the above example, we are selecting all divs and changing its background color to yellow. If you are familiar with jQuery, the syntax looks similar to jQuery selectors or HTML5 Selectors.

D3 allows us to bind the data to the DOM elements and their attributes using a Data method which takes an array. For example:

d3.selectAll("div")
  .data([200,300,400,100])
  .style("height", function (data) { return data + "px"; });

In the above example, we are selecting all the div’s on the page and based on the index, the first value of an array will be passed to first div, second value to second div and so on.

In D3, you can also make use of Enter and Exit selector methods to create new nodes for incoming data, and remove outing nodes that are no longer used.

You can also apply transitions to nodes using D3. For example –

var area = d3.select('body')
            .append('svg')
            .attr('width', 500)
            .attr('height', 500);
 
var circle = area.append('rect')
                 .attr('width', 100)
                 .attr('height', 100)
                 .attr('fill', 'red');
 
circle.transition()
      .duration(2000)
      .delay(2000)
      .attr('width', 400)
      .each('start', function () {
            d3.select(this).attr('fill', 'green');})
      .transition()
      .duration(2000)
      .attr('height', 400)
      .transition()
      .duration(2000)
      .attr('width', 50)
      .transition()
      .duration(2000)
      .attr('height', 50)
      .each('end', function () {
            d3.select(this).attr('fill', 'blue'); });

In the above example, we are drawing a Rectangle and applying the transition to the same. Likewise, we can make use of various features of D3.js to present our data using rich visualizations.

A Quick overview of ASP.NET Web API

REST(REpresentational State Transfer) has emerged as the prominent way to create web services. By using REST we can build loose coupled services with data available on the web over HTTP protocol.

ASP.NET Web API is a platform for building RESTful applications. ASP.NET Web API is a framework using which we can build HTTP Services which can be called from a broad range of clients, browsers and mobile devices. ASP.NET Web API is the defacto standard of creating web services and replaces WCF.

When we think about exposing data on the web, we usually talk about four common operations which we use on a daily basis in our apps – CREATE, RETRIVE, UPDATE, DELETE.

We call these operations as CRUD operations. REST provides 4 basic HTTP verbs which we can map to our CRUD operations as described here - POST – CREATE, GET – RETRIVE, PUT – UPDATE, DELETE – DELETE.

By using REST, if you can connect to the web, any application can consume your data. When the data is pulled or pushed by using REST, the data is always serialized into or de-serialized from JSON or XML.

Setting up the application and ASP.NET Web API

To start designing the Pie chart and Donut chart, use the following tools and technologies:

  • Microsoft Visual Studio 2013 (Express or Professional)
  • Microsoft SQL Server 2012 (Express or Developer)
  • jQuery
  • D3.js
  • ASP.NET WEB API

Let’s first design the table where we can add our data. To design the table, open SQL Server Management Studio and write the following script:

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[CityPopulationTable](
    [CityID] [int] IDENTITY PRIMARY KEY,
    [CityName] [nvarchar](30) NULL,
    [Population] [int] NULL
)

Create an ASP.NET Web application by choosing Web Forms template. Then add the Entity Framework, jQuery and D3.js libraries into our web application using NuGet.

Once you add these libraries, right click on the Models folder in our Web application under Solution Explorer, and click on Add New Item. Choose Data  > ADO.NET Entity Data Model.

Using Entity Data Model Wizard, connect to our database and choose CityPopulationTable.

It’s time to implement the ASP.NET Web API into our project. Right click the web application and add a new folder with the name Controllers.

After adding the Web API, open Global.asax file and import two namespaces as shown here:

using System.Web.Http;
using System.Web.Routing;

Also add the following code to the Application_Start method –

GlobalConfiguration.Configure(WebApiConfig.Register);

The above line registers the Web API route in our web application. Now under App_Start folder, you will find WebApiConfig.cs file. Open this file and write the following code:

public static void Register(HttpConfiguration config)
{
    config.MapHttpAttributeRoutes();
 
    config.Routes.MapHttpRoute(
        name: "DefaultApi",
        routeTemplate: "api/{controller}/{id}",
        defaults: new { id = RouteParameter.Optional }
    );
    var json = config.Formatters.JsonFormatter;
    json.SerializerSettings.PreserveReferencesHandling = Newtonsoft.Json.PreserveReferencesHandling.Objects;
    json.SerializerSettings.ContractResolver = new CamelCasePropertyNamesContractResolver();
    config.Formatters.Remove(config.Formatters.XmlFormatter);
}

In the above code, we are configuring Web API to make use of JSON formatter with camel casing, as most of the JavaScript developer will expect JSON output in Camel casing.

Now modify the Get method of our Web API controller as shown here:

public class PieChartController : ApiController
{
    NorthwindEntities dataContext = new NorthwindEntities();
    // GET api/piechart
    public IEnumerable<CityPopulationTable> Get()
    {
        return dataContext.CityPopulationTables.ToList();
    }
}

In the above code, we have created an object of our Entity Data model which will give access to the tables. Then we are returning an IEnumerable of our object CityPopulationTables.

Let us design our Pie chart and Donut chart using the Web API data shown in above:

Creating D3 Charts

Add a HTML page with the name ‘CityPolulationPieChart.html’. Once you add the page, we will reference the jQuery and D3.js file in the page:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
<head>
    <title>Pie Chart Example</title>
    <script src="Scripts/jquery-1.10.2.js"></script>
    <script src="Scripts/d3.js"></script>
</head>

We will make use of jQuery AJAX function to fetch the data from our Web API and display it in a Pie and Donut chart. Let’s add a DOM ready function into our <body> tag. In this function, we will first declare two arrays. First array will hold the data for our chart and the second array will hold the colors which we will use for our chart:

$(function () {
            var chartData = [];
            var colors = [];
});

In the next step, we will fetch the data from our Web API using jQuery $.ajax function. Add this code after our array declaration:

$.ajax({
        type: "GET",
        url: "api/PieChart",
        contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8",
        dataType: "json",
        success: function (result) {
            $.each(result, function (i,j) {
                chartData.push(j.population);
                var currentColor = '#' + Math.floor(Math.random() * j.population+5566656).toString(16);
                colors.push(currentColor);
            });
            console.log(chartData);}
        error: function (msg) {
            $("#result").text(msg);
        }
});

Note: Although I have used success and error here for devs using an older version of jQuery, these methods have been deprecated from jQuery 1.8. You should replace them with .done() and fail().

In the above code, we are using a GET request with the Web API URL and the type of data set to JSON. On successful completion of the request, we are running a loop using $.each() which will push the fetched data into our chartData array. We are also generating colors and adding them into our colors array.

Now it’s time to use the D3 selector. We will use D3 selector to select the body and will append the SVG element to the same by setting its height and width. Add this code after console.log function. The code is shown below –

var radius = 300;
var colorScale = d3.scale.ordinal().range(colors);
                    
var area = d3.select('body').append('svg')
             .attr('width', 1500)
             .attr('height', 1500);

Also note that we are using the scale function of D3 which allows us to set the ordinal scale with the range to set the scale’s output range. We have also added a variable called radius which is set to 300.

The next step is to group the elements and draw an arc into our SVG as shown in the following code:

var pieGroup = area.append('g').attr('transform', 'translate(300, 300)');
var arc = d3.svg.arc()
                .innerRadius(0)
                .outerRadius(radius);

In the above code, we are using radius variable as the outer radius and fixing the inner radius to 0. As the next step, use a pie layout available under D3. Then pass the chart data and append it to our group ‘g’. The code is shown below –

var pie = d3.layout.pie()
       .value(function (data) { return data; })
var arcs = pieGroup.selectAll('.arc')
       .data(pie(chartData))
       .enter()
       .append('g')
       .attr('class', 'arc');

Also observe, we are using D3 selector to select arc class added at the end, which will select all the elements which has a class arc. In the last step,  append the path and fill the color from our array. We will also display the population data as text to our pie chart. The code is shown below –

arcs.append('path')
    .attr('d', arc)
    .attr('fill', function (d) { return colorScale(d.data); });
 
arcs.append('text')
    .attr('transform', function (data) { return 'translate(' + arc.centroid(data) + ')'; })
    .attr('text-anchor', 'middle')
    .attr('font-size', '1em')
    .text(function (data) { return data.data; });

Donut Chart

Designing a Donut chart is very simple. Just change the inner radius to something higher than zero. I am making it 200. The code is as shown here:

var arc = d3.svg.arc()
        .innerRadius(200)
        .outerRadius(radius);

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ASP.NET MVC 6 Hosting - ASPHostPortal :: Remote Validation in ASP.NET MVC

clock August 24, 2015 08:07 by author Kenny

Remote Validation in ASP.NET MVC

ASP.NET is an open-source server-side Web application framework designed for Web development to produce dynamic Web pages. It was developed by Microsoft to allow programmers to build dynamic web sites, web applications and web services. ASP.NET MVC gives you a powerful, patterns-based way to build dynamic websites that enables a clean separation of concerns and that gives you full control over markup. Remote validation is used to make server calls to validate data without posting the entire form to the server when server side validation is preferable to client side.  It's all done set up model and controller which is pretty neat. 

Using the Code

To implement remote validation in an application we have two scenarios, one is without an additional parameter and the other is with an additional parameter. First we create an example without an additional parameter. In this example we check whether a username exists or not. If the username exists then that means the input user name is not valid. We create a view model class "UserViewModel" under the Models folder and that code is:

using System.Web.Mvc;  
namespace RemoteValidation.Models   
{  
    public class UserViewModel   
    {  
        public string UserName   
        {  
            get;  
            set;  
        }  
        public string Email   
        {  
            get;  
            set;  
        }  
    }  
}

 

Now we create a static data source, in other words we create a static list of UserViewModel in which we could check whether a username exists or not. You can also use the database rather than a static list. The following code snippet is for StaticData.

using RemoteValidation.Models;  
using System.Collections.Generic;  
 
namespace RemoteValidation.Code   
{  
    public static class StaticData   
    {  
        public static List < UserViewModel > UserList   
        {  
            get {  
                return new List < UserViewModel >   
                {  
                    new UserViewModel   
                    {  
                        UserName = "User1", Email = "[email protected]"  
                    },  
                    new UserViewModel   
                    {  
                        UserName = "User2", Email = "[email protected]"  
                    }  
                }  
            }  
        }  
    }  

 

Now we create a controller "ValidationController" in which we create an action method to check whether a user name exists or not and return a result as a JSON format. If the username exists then it returns false so that the validation is implemented on the input field. The following code snippet shows ValidationController under the Controllers folder.

using RemoteValidation.Code;  
using System.Linq;  
using System.Web.Mvc;  
 
namespace RemoteValidation.Controllers   
{  
    public class ValidationController: Controller   
    {  
        [HttpGet]  
        public JsonResult IsUserNameExist(string userName)   
        {  
            bool isExist = StaticData.UserList.Where(u = > u.UserName.ToLowerInvariant().Equals(userName.ToLower())).FirstOrDefault() != null;  
            return Json(!isExist, JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);  
        }  
    }  
}

 

Now we add remote validation on the UserName of the UserViewModel property as in the following code snippet.

using System.Web.Mvc;  
 
namespace RemoteValidation.Models   
{  
    public class UserViewModel   
    {  
        [Remote("IsUserNameExist", "Validation", ErrorMessage = "User name already exist")]  
        public string UserName   
        {  
            get;  
            set;  
        }  
        public string Email   
        {  
            get;  
            set;  
        }  
    }  

 

As in the preceding code snippet, the IsUserNameExist is a method of ValidationController that is called on the blur of an input field using a GET request. Now we create UserController under the Controllers folder to render a view on the UI.

using RemoteValidation.Models;  
using System.Web.Mvc;  
 
namespace RemoteValidation.Controllers   
{  
    public class UserController: Controller   
    {  
        [HttpGet]  
        public ActionResult AddUser()   
        {  
            UserViewModel model = new UserViewModel();  
            return View(model);  
        }  
    }  

Now we add jquery.validate.js and jquery.validate.unobtrusive.js to the project and create a bundle as in the following code snippet.

using System.Web.Optimization;  
 
namespace RemoteValidation.App_Start   
{  
    public class BundleConfig   
    {  
        public static void RegisterBundles(BundleCollection bundles)   
        {  
            bundles.Add(new StyleBundle("~/Content/css").Include(  
                "~/Content/css/bootstrap.css",  
                "~/Content/css/font-awesome.css",  
                "~/Content/css/site.css"));  
 
            bundles.Add(new ScriptBundle("~/bundles/jquery").Include(  
                "~/Scripts/jquery-{version}.js"));  
 
            bundles.Add(new ScriptBundle("~/bundles/jqueryval").Include(  
                "~/Scripts/jquery.validate*"));  
        }  
    }  

Thereafter we add the following keys in the web.config file.

<add key="ClientValidationEnabled" value="true" />   
<add key="UnobtrusiveJavaScriptEnabled" value="true" />  
 
 

Thereafter we create a view for the AddUser action method. The following code snippet is for the AddUser view.

@model RemoteValidation.Models.UserViewModel  
 
< div class = "panel panel-primary" > < div class = "panel-heading panel-head" > Add User < /div>    
    <div class="panel-body">    
        @using (Html.BeginForm())    
        {    
            <div class="form-horizontal">    
                <div class="form-group">    
                    @Html.LabelFor(model => model.UserName, new { @class = "col-lg-2 control-label" })    
                    <div class="col-lg-9">    
                        @Html.TextBoxFor(model => model.UserName, new { @class = "form-control" })    
                        @Html.ValidationMessageFor(model => model.UserName)    
                    </div > < /div>    
                <div class="form-group">    
                    @Html.LabelFor(model => model.Email, new { @class = "col-lg-2 control-label" })    
                    <div class="col-lg-9">    
                        @Html.TextBoxFor(model => model.Email, new { @class = "form-control" })    
                        @Html.ValidationMessageFor(model => model.Email)    
                    </div > < /div>                    
                <div class="form-group">    
                    <div class="col-lg-9"></div > < div class = "col-lg-3" > < button class = "btn btn-success"  
                     id = "btnSubmit"  
                     type = "submit" > Submit < /button>    
                    </div >
               < /div>    
            </div >  
} < /div>    
</div >   
@section scripts   
{  
    @Scripts.Render("~/bundles/jqueryval")  

Let's run the application and put values into the user name field to execute the remote validation as in the following image.

Figure 1: Remote validation on user name


Now we move to another option, we pass an additional parameter in the remote validation. We pass both the user name and email as a parameter and check whether the username and email combination exist or not on the email input. That's why we add one more method in ValidationController as in the following code snippet for it.

[HttpGet]  
public JsonResult IsUserExist(string email, string userName)   
{  
    bool isExist = StaticData.UserList.Where(u = > u.UserName.ToLowerInvariant().Equals(userName.ToLower()) && u.Email.ToLowerInvariant().Equals(email.ToLower())).FirstOrDefault() != null;  
    return Json(!isExist, JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);  

Now we call this method on the Email property of UserViewModel as in the following code snippet.

using System.Web.Mvc;  
 
namespace RemoteValidation.Models   
{  
    public class UserViewModel   
    {  
        [Remote("IsUserNameExist", "Validation", ErrorMessage = "User name already exist")]  
        public string UserName   
        {  
            get;  
            set;  
        }  
        [Remote("IsUserExist", "Validation", ErrorMessage = "User already exist", AdditionalFields = "UserName")]  
        public string Email   
        {  
            get;  
            set;  
        }  
    }  
}

As in the preceding code snippet, we are passing an additional field using AdditionalFields in Remote. If we must pass more than one parameter then these will be comma-separated. Now run the application and the result will be as shown in the following image.  



ASP.NET 4.5.2 Hosting with ASPHostPortal.com :: Responsive Layout Using Bootstrap in ASP.NET

clock September 22, 2014 13:29 by author Kenny

ASP.NET Responsive Layout using Bootstrap

In this article we will explain about how to design responsive layout using bootstrap in your ASP.NET site. ASP.NET is an open source server-side Web application framework designed for Web development to produce dynamic Web pages. It was developed by Microsoft to allow programmers to build dynamic web sites, web applications and web services.

ASP.NET Responsive Layout:

Responsive Web design is the approach that suggests that design and development should respond to the user's behavior and environment based on screen size, platform and orientation. The practice consists of a mix of flexible grids and layouts, images and an intelligent use of CSS media queries.

Why You Need Responsive Web Design?

Every people open website on mobile device, tablet device and desktop on different-different size that time our website layout is not good looking so web designer design the different-different website for different-different devices for good look and feel website so that process is very time taken. So reduce that process invent to “Responsive Layout” word.

Pillar of Responsive Layout:

1. Fluid Grids:

The general practice in web design is to employ fixed width layouts. It means that the page and its constituent elements have a fixed size and width and positioned around the center. Liquid layouts offer us a greater advantage with the increasing number of devices with web access. A liquid layout expands with the page.

2. Flexible Images:

Web page text is fluid by default: as the browser window narrows, text reflows to occupy the remaining space. Images are not naturally fluid: they remain the same size and orientation at all configurations of the viewport, and will be cropped if they become too large for their container. This creates a problem when displaying images in a mobile browser: because they remain at their native size, images may be cut off or displayed out-of-scale compared to the surrounding text content as the browser narrows.

3. Media Queries:

Fluid grid layouts are very important for responsive web development, but there are other issues to consider. If the width of the device becomes too narrow, like in a small mobile phone, the website design can fall apart. This is where media queries come in. These media queries are based in CSS3 and allow us to not only target the particular device classes but physical characteristics of the device which is rendering the web site.

Add these four files:

<link href="~/Content/bootstrap-3.1.1-dist/css/bootstrap.min.css" rel="stylesheet" />
<link href="~/Content/blog.css" rel="stylesheet" />
<script src="~/scripts/jquery-2.1.0.min.js"></script>
<script src="~/scripts/bootstrap-3.1.1-dist/js/bootstrap.min.js"></script>

Example:

Html Code

<header class="navbar navbar-inverse navbar-fixed-top bs-docs-nav" role="banner">
    <div class="container">
        <div class="navbar-header">
            <button class="navbar-toggle" type="button" data-toggle="collapse" data-target=".bs-navbar-collapse">
                <span class="sr-only">Toggle Navigation</span>
                <span class="icon-bar"></span>
                <span class="icon-bar"></span>
                <span class="icon-bar"></span>
            </button>
            @Html.ActionLink("Brand", "Index", "Home", null, new { @class = "navbar-brand" })
        </div>
        <nav class="collapse navbar-collapse bs-navbar-collapse" role="navigation">
            <ul class="nav navbar-nav">
                <li class="active">@Html.ActionLink("Home", "", "")</li>
                <li>@Html.ActionLink("Article", "", "")</li>
                <li>@Html.ActionLink("Blog", "", "")</li>
                <li>@Html.ActionLink("Forum", "", "")</li>
                <li>@Html.ActionLink("Interview", "", "")</li>
                <li class="dropdown">
                    <a class="dropdown-toggle" data-toggle="dropdown" href="#" id="themes">Themes <span class="caret"></span></a>
                    <ul class="dropdown-menu" aria-labelledby="themes">
                        <li><a href="../default/">Default</a></li>
                        <li class="divider"></li>
                        <li><a href="../david/">David</a></li>
                        <li><a href="../lily/">Lily</a></li>
                        <li><a href="../jasmine/">Jasmine</a></li>
                    </ul>
                </li>
            </ul>
            <ul class="nav navbar-nav navbar-right">
                <li>@Html.ActionLink("Sign Up", "", "")</li>
                <li>@Html.ActionLink("Login", "", "")</li>
                <li>
                    <form class="navbar-form navbar-left" role="search">
                        <div class="form-group">
                            <input type="text" class="form-control" placeholder="Search">
                        </div>
                    </form>
                </li>
            </ul>
        </nav>
    </div>
</header>
<div class="container">
    <br />
    <br />
    <div class="row">
        <img src="~/Content/Images/Sample1.png" class="banner" />
    </div>
    <br />   
    <div class="row">
        <div class="col-md-4">
            <img src="~/Content/Images/mobile-devlopment.png" />
        </div>
        <div class="col-md-8">
            <p>

Web page text is fluid by default: as the browser window narrows, text reflows to occupy the remaining space. Images are not naturally fluid: they remain the same size and orientation at all configurations of the viewport, and will be cropped if they become too large for their container. This creates a problem when displaying images in a mobile browser: because they remain at their native size, images may be cut off or displayed out-of-scale compared to the surrounding text content as the browser narrows.

 </p>
        </div>
    </div>
    <br />
    <br />
    <div class="well">
        <div class="row">
            <div class="col-md-6">
                <label>First Name</label>
                <input type="text" />
            </div>
            <div class="col-md-6">
                <label>Last Name</label>
                <input type="text" />
            </div>
        </div>
        <br />
        <div class="row">
            <div class="col-md-6">
                <label>Email ID</label>
                <input type="text" />
            </div>
            <div class="col-md-6">
                <label>Country</label>
                <select>
                    <option>---Select---</option>
                    <option>USA</option>
                    <option>UK</option>
                    <option>Netherland</option>
                    <option>Hongkong</option>
                </select>
            </div>
        </div>
        <br />
        <div class="row">
            <div class="col-md-6">
                <label>State</label>

                <select>
                </select>
            </div>
            <div class="col-md-6">
                <label>City</label>
                <select>
               </select>
            </div>
        </div>
        <br />
        <div class="row">
            <div class="col-md-6">
                <label>Zip Code</label>
                <input type="text" />
            </div>
            <div class="col-md-6">
                <label>Contact No</label>
                <input type="text" />
            </div>
        </div>
        <br />
        <div class="row">
            <div class="col-md-12 text-right">
                <input type="button" value="Submit" class="btn btn-info" />
                <input type="button" value="Clear" class="btn btn-info" />
            </div>
        </div>
    </div>
    <br />
    <br />
</div>

Blog.css

Img
{
    width: auto;
    max-width: 100%;
}
.banner {
    width:100%;
    height:250px;

}
input[type='text'],select {
    width:100%;
    height:30px;
}
@media screen and (min-width: 100px) and (max-width:750px) {
    .banner {
        display:none;
    }
}



ASP.NET 4.5.2 Hosting with ASPHostPortal :: How to Publish and Deploy an ASP.NET Application in IIS

clock September 16, 2014 12:08 by author Kenny

Simple Way to Publish and Deploy an ASP.NET Application in IIS

ASP.NET is an open source server-side Web application framework designed for Web development to produce dynamic Web pages. It was developed by Microsoft to allow programmers to build dynamic web sites, web applications and web services. While Internet Information Services (IIS, formerly Internet Information Server) is an extensible web server created by Microsoft for use with Windows NT family. IIS supports HTTP, HTTPS, FTP, FTPS, SMTP and NNTP.

In this post, we will describe you how to publish and deploy your ASP.NET application in IIS. Actually it is so simple thing, you can publish your web application to the File System and copy paste all the files to your server. After that, you can add a new website from IIS. If you are not sure what files you should include, it's better to choose 'All files in the project' from the Package/Publish Web. Otherwise choose 'Only files needed to run this application'. You can set this by right clicking on the web application in the solution explorer and choosing 'Package/Publish Settings'.

Right click on your project in the solution explorer and choose 'Publish'. From the dialog box, as the publish method, choose 'File System'. And choose some directory as the Target Location.

You can add the website by right clicking on the 'Sites' in IIS.

Then give a name to your site and select the Physical path from where you copied the site folder

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Are you looking for best and cheap ASP.NET Hosting? Look no further, ASPHostPortal.com is your ASP.NET hosting home! Start your ASP.NET hosting with only $1.00/month. All of our .NET hosting plan comes with 30 days money back guarantee, so you can try our service with no risk. Why wait longer?



ASP.NET 4.5.2 Hosting with ASPHostPortal.com :: SEO Tips for Your ASP.NET Site

clock August 23, 2014 09:42 by author Kenny

Here are 7 tips on SEO for your ASP.NET website:

A Microsoft server-side Web technology. ASP.NET takes an object-oriented programming approach to Web page execution. Every element in an ASP.NET page is treated as an object and run on the server. An ASP.NET page gets compiled into an intermediate language by a .NET Common Language Runtime-compliant compiler.

Page Titles

Page titles between tags is one important thing that many fail to practice in SEO. When a search is made in Google, these titles show up as links in the result. So that explains its importance. The common mistake among website owners is giving the same title for all pages. Page titles drive traffic to your site, hence it is important to have a proper title to attract visitors. Adding titles is not as hard as you imagine. If you have a product catalog use your product name as title. You can also choose to give a different title that is related to your product.

Meaningful URL

URLs that are long with query parameters do not look neat and it is difficult for the visitor to remember. Instead use formatted URLs for your static pages. URL which has a meaning explains the content in your website. Although experts agree with using an URL that has query parameters, it is better to have a meaningful URL. Components like UrlRewritingNet can be used for this purpose. Mapping support in URL is offered by IIS7 which has plenty of features.

Structure of the Content

Content without a structure is not possible.  You will have titles, headings, sub headings, paragraphs and others. How would you emphasize some quotes or important points in your content? If you follow the below mentioned steps, the structure of your content will be semantically correct.

  • Divide long stories or parts using headings. Short paragraphs make more sense to the readers. Use tags to bring beauty to your content.
  • If you want to emphasize an important point or quote, place them between tags.

Visitors can create structured content if you use FCKEditor and the like. Integrating these to your website is not complex.

Clean the Source Code

Don’t panic, it is advisable to clean up the source code and minimize the number of codes. The following simple steps will assist you in cleaning the source code: You can use

  • External stylesheets and not inline CSS
    • js files instead of inline JavaScript
  • HTML comments is not encouraged
  • Avoid massive line breaking
  • Avoid using viewstate when not required

The relation between the content and the code (JavaScript, HTML, CSS) determines the ranking of your website. Smaller source codes help build a strong relation.

Crawlable Site

Do not use

  • Silver or flash light for menus or to highlight information
  • Menus based on JavaScript
  • Menus based on buttons
  • Intro-pages

Do use

  • Simple tags wherever possible
  • Sitemap
  • “Alt” for images
  • RSS

Test the Site

What happens to the requests that are sent when the site is slow? Sometimes requests are sent by robots and if they are unable to connect to your site continuously, they drop the site from their index. Enable your site to respond fast to requests even during peak hours. Moreover, visitors don’t like to visit slow sites. Use the various tools available and conduct the stress test for your site. Perform this and locate all the weak parts of the site. Fix them so that your site gets indexed. 

Test the AJAX site

Spiders can only run a few parts of your AJAX website because they don’t run JavaScripts. Spiders can only analyze the data and hence they remain invisible to robots. The AJAX sites do not get indexed which does not help in search engine optimization. To make the site spider friendly, try and keep away from initial content loading into the JavaScript. You can also follow this only for pages that you like to index.  Make it easy for robots so that they can navigate. Try this simple trick to see how your AJAX site will appear to the robots. Disable JavaScript from the browser and visit your AJAX site. You can view the pages which robots will index.



Cheap WebSocket Hosting Tutorial :: How to Enable or Disable WebSocket Protocol on Windows Server 2012 and Windows 8

clock July 15, 2014 08:32 by author Ben

Websocket implements the server side of the WebSocket protocol. The WebSocket protocol is a protocol introduced in HTML5, intended to replace Comet and other long-polling solutions, to provide a rich communication mechanism over HTTP. The WebSocket protocol was standardized by IETF as RFC 6455. We could find introductions and more information on Wikipedia and W3C.

Microsoft .NET 4.5 provides several ways in using WebSocket. On the server side, we can host our WebSocket server through any one of the ways below:

  • Using HttpContext.AcceptWebSocketRequest
  • Creating a WCF service with CallbackContract and the new netHttpBinding
  • Using WebSocketHandler or WebSocketHost provided in Microsoft.WebSockets.dll


Here is the step by step how to enable WebSocket Protocol on Windows
Server 2012 and Windows 8 on server side:

NOTE: The web server must be IIS 8 and above.


Enable WebSocket Protocol in Windows Server 2012


On Windows Server 2012, you could do that through Server Manager -> Manage -> Add Roles and Features. -> Expand the Web Server (IIS) role and check Web Server -> Application Development -> WebSocket Protocol.


Enable WebSocket Protocol in Windows 8


Open "Control Panel" -> Open "Turn Windows features on or off" -> Expand Internet Information Services” -> Expand World Wide Web Services” -> ExpandApplication Development Features" -> Checklist WebSocket Protocol and clickOK


Disable WebSocket when using socket.io on node.js


If you are using the WebSocket support in socket.io on node.js in your site, you will need to disable the default IIS WebSockets module by adding the below snippet to your web.config or applicationHost.config. If this is not done, the IIS WebSockets module will attempt to handle the WebSocket communication rather than letting this task fall through to node.js (and hence your application). This will result in unexpected errors when you attempt to access your site.

<system.webServer>
    ...
    <webSocket enabled=”false”/>
</system.webServer>


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ASP.NET 4.,5 Hosting - ASPHostPortal.com :: Websockets with ASP.Net 4.5 and Visual Studio 2012

clock April 11, 2013 12:11 by author Ben

Web applications are becoming increasingly sophisticated and it is common to need to communicate with various services. There are a number of options to accomplish this task with probably the most popular being to continually poll a server with XHR requests. Other alternatives exist that delay disconnections. These can be tricky to implement and don’t scale well (sometimes worse than polling as they keep a connection open) so aren’t used as much.

 

HTTP isn’t really an ideal protocol for performing frequent requests as:

  • It’s not optimized for speed
  • It utilizes a lot of bandwidth for every request with various headers etc sent with every request
  • To keep an application up to date many requests must be sent
  • Provides limited cross domain support
  • Firewalls & proxys sometimes buffer streaming/long polling solutions increasing latency
  • Long polling & streaming solutions are not very scalable

WebSockets are a new technology that attempts to resolve some of these limitations by:

  • Sending the minimum amount of data necessary
  • Making more efficient usage of bandwidth
  • Providing cross domain support
  • Still operating over HTTP so it can transverse firewalls and proxies
  • Works with some load balancers (TCP l4)
  • Provides support for binary data (note some JavaScript implementations don’t currently support this)

When would web sockets be a suitable protocol for your application?
You might want to consider using web sockets in the following scenarios:

  • Games
  • Real time data
  • Chat applications
  • News tickers

Websockets pitfalls
Websockets is a relatively new protocol that has already undergone a number of versions as various issues are addressed. This is important as support across browsers varies.
At the time of writing Websockets (in some form) can be used by the following browsers (check caniuse.com for the most up to date info):

  • IE10
  • Chrome 13+
  • Firefox 7
  • Safari 5+
  • Opera 11+

Earlier implementations of websockets had some security issues so your connections may work but are not secure (Firefox disabled support in Firefox 4 & 5 for this reason).
The other issue that you may encounter is that some older proxy servers don’t support the http upgrade system that websockets uses to connect so some clients may be unable to connect.

.NET 4.5 Web Socket Support
.NET 4.5 introduces a number of APIs for working with web sockets. If you find you need more control than the ASP.net API’s offers then look into WCF as that has also been updated. Before we begin there are a couple of requirements for using ASP.net web sockets API:

  • Application must be hosted on IIS 8 (available only with some version of Windows 8 – please note currently IIS Express currently does not work)
  • Web Sockets protocol feature installed (IIS option)
  • .net 4.5
  • A compatible browser on the client (IE10 or Chrome will 18 work fine at time of writing)
  • It would help if your Chinese birth animal was the horse

Hello Web Sockets Example!
Ok I am going to assume that you are already working with some version of Windows 8 that has IIS & ASP.net 4.5 installed. The other thing we are going to need to do is make sure IIS has the Web Sockets Protocol feature installed (this is in the add/remove programs bit):

- First create a new empty ASP.net project called WebSockets
- Add the Nuget package Microsoft.Websockets
- Pull down the latest jQuery library and put it in a scripts directory (I am using 1.7.2) – note jQuery isn’t necessary it just saves a bit of tedious event and manipulation code.

Now add a file called index.htm and enter the following code:

<!doctype html>
<head>
<script src="Scripts/jquery-1.7.2.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
$(document).ready(function () {
var name = prompt('what is your name?:');
var url = 'ws://' + window.location.hostname + window.location.pathname.replace('index.htm', 'ws.ashx') + '?name=' + name;
alert('Connecting to: ' + url);
ws = new WebSocket(url);
ws.onopen = function () {
$('#messages').prepend('Connected <br/>');
$('#cmdSend').click(function () {
ws.send($('#txtMessage').val());
$('#txtMessage').val('');
});
};
ws.onmessage = function (e) {
$('#chatMessages').prepend(e.data + '<br/>');
};
$('#cmdLeave').click(function () {
ws.close();
});
ws.onclose = function () {
$('#chatMessages').prepend('Closed <br/>');
};
ws.onerror = function (e) {
$('#chatMessages').prepend('Oops something went wront <br/>');
};
});
</script>
</head>
<body>
<input id="txtMessage" />
<input id="cmdSend" type="button" value="Send" />
<input id="cmdLeave" type="button" value="Leave" />
<br />
<div id="chatMessages" />
</body>
</html>


We need to create an http handler so add a new generic handler to the project called ws.ashx and enter the following code:


using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Web;
using Microsoft.Web.WebSockets;
namespace WebSockets
{
public class WSHttpHandler : IHttpHandler
{
public void ProcessRequest(HttpContext context)
{
if (context.IsWebSocketRequest)
context.AcceptWebSocketRequest(new TestWebSocketHandler());
}
public bool IsReusable
{
get
{
return false;
}
}
}
}

Finally we need to create something to handle the websocket connection (TestWebSocketHandler that is created in the AcceptWebSocketRequest method).
Create a new class called TestWebSocketHandler and enter the following code:


using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Threading;
using System.Web;
using Microsoft.Web.WebSockets;
namespace WebSockets
{
public class TestWebSocketHandler : WebSocketHandler
{
private static WebSocketCollection clients = new WebSocketCollection();
private string name;
public override void OnOpen()
{
this.name = this.WebSocketContext.QueryString["name"];
clients.Add(this);
clients.Broadcast(name + " has connected.");
}
public override void OnMessage(string message)
{
clients.Broadcast(string.Format("{0} said: {1}", name, message));
}
public override void OnClose()
{
clients.Remove(this);


That’s all you need so now compile the project and run it in a compatible browser (IE10 or the latest Chrome will do fine) making sure you are hosting your project from IIS (project properties if you are not).


Once you have run it up you will be prompted to provide a name, then an alert box will indicate the end point of your application (ws://localhost/.. – note the secure https version is wss://).


Now open up a different browser and you should find you can via websockets.



Cheap ASP.NET 4.5 Hosting

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Success for us is something that is continually experienced, not something that is reached. For us it is all about the experience – more than the journey. Life is a continual experience. We see the Internet as being an incredible amplifier to the experience of life for all of us. It can help humanity come together to explode in knowledge exploration and discussion. It is continual enlightenment of new ideas, experiences, and passions


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